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American Art

ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012
Art Museums & Institutions African American Heritage Museum 661 Jackson Rd., Newtonville, NJ; 609-704-5495. www.aahmsnj.org . 101 Quilts. Donations accepted. Closes 12/15. Tue.-Fri. 10 am-3 pm. The Barnes Foundation - Philadelphia 2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.; 215-278-7000. www.barnesfoundation.org . $18; $15 seniors 65 and over; $10 students and 17 and under. Sat.-Mon., Wed.-Thu. 9:30 am-6 pm; Fri. 9:30 am-10 pm. Brandywine River Museum Rte. 1 & Rte. 100, Chadds Ford; 610-388-2700.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
Since it opened in 1988, the James A. Michener Art Museum has assiduously promoted the art of Bucks County, particularly the New Hope colony, and American art in general. It's a bit of a jolt, then, to walk into the museum's special exhibitions space and encounter a display of European Old Master art, most of it Italian and all of it religious. The 43 paintings and two tapestries come from the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, one of the world's most celebrated museums and home to a matchless collection of Italian art. The exhibition is both the Michener's first international project and outgoing director Bruce Katsiff's valedictory.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Elaine Kurtz came to William R. Valerio's attention about a year ago when he saw one of her paintings in the home of Nancy Posel, a longtime friend of the artist's and a supporter of Woodmere Art Museum. The recently appointed Woodmere director was so intrigued by the work that he decided that Kurtz, who died in 2003 at 75, was an artist deserving of a major exhibition. Although represented in the collections of four Washington museums (Corcoran, Hirshhorn, National Gallery, National Museum of American Art)
NEWS
January 31, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
That the Philadelphia Museum of Art is hosting a major van Gogh exhibition - it opens Wednesday - would be no mystery to the devoted Japanese pilgrims who bear ancestral ashes halfway across the world to commingle them with the earth of Vincent van Gogh's grave north of Paris. Nor would it be difficult to understand for the Russians who pour vodka onto the dark red soil of the same spot. The thousands from all over the world who travel to Auvers-sur-Oise, where van Gogh is buried next to his brother Theo, would understand.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
For more than four decades, Sande Webster has been a torch on the Philadelphia art scene. First at Locust Street Gallery, founded by Webster and three partners, then on her own, she has been a force for the commercial exhibition of photography, ceramics, and textiles as art, and - perhaps most notably - has provided an uninterrupted outlet for the work of African American artists. After 42 years running a gallery here, through the recessions of the early 1980s, the early 1990s, and the early 2000s, Webster is finally closing.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
As Bank of America expanded in recent decades by absorbing other banks, it built up a substantial collection of art once owned by those banks. The Philadelphia Museum of Art recently exhibited one such constituent collection, a group of watercolors by the 19th-century painter Alfred Jacob Miller. Through the end of the year, the African American Museum in Philadelphia is featuring another aspect of Bank of America's art holdings - paintings, works on paper, and a few sculptures and mixed-media pieces by African American artists.
NEWS
August 21, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Jonathan Westervelt Warner, known as Jack, has spent more than half his 94 years building up an impressive collection of American fine and decorative arts - between 700 and 800 objects made over nearly two centuries. Until recently, the public could visit the collection at the institution he created in 2003 to display it, the Westervelt-Warner Museum of American Art in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he lives. But over the last year, and particularly in recent months, the Warner collection has been sundered, and some of its more important paintings have been sold.
NEWS
June 19, 2011 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Alfred Jacob Miller was one of a half-dozen American artists, some foreign-born, who introduced the Western frontier, particularly indigenous cultures, to American art. This happened mainly in the 1830s, when Miller and his contemporaries ventured beyond the Mississippi River into the Great Plains, as far as the Rocky Mountains. The first to go, perhaps the most prolific and best-known Indian painter, was George Catlin, a native of Wilkes-Barre, who traveled up the Missouri River for 2,000 miles with an American Fur Co. expedition in 1832.
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