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American Art

ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
This review originally appeared in March during coverage of the Philadelphia Film Festival and Philadelphia Cinefest 09. During the 1960s and 1970s, when American art was, for many, indecipherable, an unassuming New York couple named Herb and Dorothy Vogel cracked the code. The postal clerk (Herb) and librarian (Dorothy) were after-hours artists, admirers of abstract expressionists and color-field painters. On their modest salaries, they couldn't afford to buy works by Jackson Pollock or Helen Frankenthaler.
NEWS
June 7, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
The Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday won the Venice Biennale's Golden Lion award for best national pavilion - the first by a commissioner of the U.S. Pavilion since 1990. In a ceremony at the pavilion attended by Italian President Giorgio Napolitano, the museum accepted honors for "Bruce Nauman: Topological Garden," echoing the capture of a similar top award two decades ago for its Jasper Johns show. "We're all so happy," Art Museum chairman H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest said. "What it represents to me is what a great loss it was when Anne d'Harnoncourt died a year ago, and the museum has not lost a step despite that.
NEWS
June 7, 2009 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
VENICE, Italy - The Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday won the Venice Biennale's Golden Lion award for best national pavilion - the first by a commissioner of the U.S. Pavilion since 1990. In a ceremony at the pavilion attended by Italian President Giorgio Napolitano, the museum accepted honors for "Bruce Nauman: Topological Garden," echoing the capture of a similar top award two decades ago for its Jasper Johns show. "We're all so happy," Art Museum chairman H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest said.
LIVING
April 24, 2009 | By Karla Klein Albertson FOR THE INQUIRER
One of the special benefits for collectors in major cities like Philadelphia is that wonderful things come to them. On the menu this weekend is a banquet of pottery from turn-of-the-century Arts-and-Crafts-movement pieces to contemporary studio works by living artists. Members of the American Art Pottery Association have been touring collections and listening to seminars this week as part of the organization's 2009 convention based in Northeast Philadelphia. Starting at 3:30 p.m. today, collectors will be able to preview about 400 lots, many featuring works by women, which will be offered for sale by auctioneer Greg Belhorn beginning at 5 p.m. During the preview reception, authors will sign their books on ceramics.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2009 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
During the 1960s and 1970s, when American art was, for many, indecipherable, an unassuming New York couple named Herb and Dorothy Vogel cracked the code. The postal clerk (Herb) and librarian (Dorothy) were after-hours artists, admirers of abstract expressionists and color-field painters. On their modest salaries, they couldn't afford to buy works by Jackson Pollock or Helen Frankenthaler. Their regular visits to museums, galleries, and artists' studios attuned them to the avant-garde, minimalists such as Richard Tuttle and conceptualists such as Christo and Jeanne-Claude.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | By Venuri Siriwardane FOR THE INQUIRER
Nine African American students stand against a brilliantly colored backdrop. Courage is emblazoned at their feet. Clutching their books, they appear determined and ready to learn in an integrated environment. The scene, a serigraph by artist Charly Palmer, is titled Little Rock Nine - 50 Years, a piece commissioned to commemorate the enrollment of nine African American students at an Arkansas high school after the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools offered inherently unequal education.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
How does a painting speak to and about a city? If the painting is Thomas Eakins' The Gross Clinic, now facing removal from Philadelphia after a surprise sale announcement Nov. 10, the dialogue includes the very essence of identity, race, intellect and creativity. It is not simply that the painting has been owned by Thomas Jefferson University since 1878, three years after it was painted here. It is not simply that Eakins studied anatomy at Jefferson and art at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.
LIVING
May 5, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
American folk art from the estate of a well-known New York dealer and a collection of quilts from a central Pennsylvania consignor will be the highlights of two auctions - one tomorrow, the other a two-session sale next weekend. Both should offer some affordable items. The folk art, from the collection of the late John Gordon and his wife, Leah, will be featured at Pook & Pook Inc.'s sale of furniture, art and accessories May 12 and 13. Gordon was a New York dealer who rode the crest of the wave of interest in American folk art in the 1970s.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's newest museum building opens in Center City today as a part of the nation's oldest art museum, and when Kim Sajet took a walk into one of its vast galleries, the artworks spoke directly to her from the walls. This surprised even Sajet, who has been living, professionally, with the works of "The Chemistry of Color," a collection of art by 41 African American artists in Philadelphia from 1970 to 1990. But there she was yesterday morning, standing in the middle of the show with a group of docents from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, giving them her curator's take on the work.
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