CollectionsAmerican Bar Association
IN THE NEWS

American Bar Association

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 20, 2001
In this Democrat-controlled town, local judges get picked by how big a payoff they make to the party leaders. But in Washington D.C. when Democrats were in control they had a more honorable selection criteria for federal judges: competence. However, with George W. Bush and some conservative Republicans, even that sensible yardstick may be thrown out in favor of rank right-wing ideology. At this rate, it's amazing that there are any competent judges to turn to. Outrage over how Philadelphia picks its judges has finally reached the point that some political hacks have been indicted.
NEWS
January 26, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia defense lawyer and former prosecutor Richard A. Sprague has sued the American Bar Association, its monthly magazine, and one of its reporters for libel over an article that he contends said he "fixes" cases. The complaint, seeking unspecified money damages, was filed earlier this month in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court and removed to federal court yesterday by lawyers for the bar association. Richard O'Brien, a lawyer for the bar association in Chicago, said the association had a policy against comment on litigation.
LIVING
July 29, 1997 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jerome and Marciarose Shestack have traveled a good 17,000 miles in the last four weeks - from Philadelphia to Poland to the Czech Republic to Philadelphia to Los Angeles to Washington and back to Philadelphia. Today, after they take the train to this afternoon's funeral of retired Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr. in Washington, they will head to an airport again. They will fly to San Francisco, where Shestack will take over as president of the American Bar Association, the first Philadelphia lawyer to lead the group in nearly three decades.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
The action of Temple University President Peter J. Liacouras in firing the Law School dean without consulting the faculty is very troublesome. Whatever the merits of the president's dispute with Dean Carl T. Singley, his actions appear to undermine faculty participation in the selection of a dean as embodied by the standards of the accrediting agencies, the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools. Roger S. Clark Haddonfield, N.J.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Roger Dennis, dean of the Thomas R. Kline School of Law of Drexel University, plans to retire in June of 2017, university provost M. Brian Blake announced in a letter to the faculty and staff on Wednesday. Dennis is the founding dean of the law school, which opened its doors in 2007 and he was instrumental in seeing it through the American Bar Association accreditation process, completed in 2011. Blake said Dennis agreed to stay while the university conducts a national search for his replacement.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. Carter, 78, of Philadelphia, a pioneer and leader for more than 40 years in the field of continuing education for lawyers, died Monday, Jan. 27, of heart failure at his home. Mr. Carter came to Philadelphia in 1993 to serve as executive director of the American Law Institute-American Bar Association Committee on Continuing Professional Education. The group is a national provider of continuing legal education. Colleague Michael Greenwald said Mr. Carter was a comfortable person with whom to work.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania bar regulator Paul Burgoyne has been elected president of the National Organization of Bar Counsel. Burgoyne serves as deputy chief disciplinary counsel of the state Supreme Court's lawyer disciplinary board. The board makes recommendations to the Supreme Court on attorney disciplinary matters, including on whether lawyers should be suspended or disbarred. The National Organization of Bar Counsel is a professional group that represents lawyers from agencies that regulate lawyers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
The American Bar Association has backed off a plan to offer lower-cost legal services to small businesses and individuals after pushback from bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois. The ABA launched the pilot project last October with Rocket Lawyer, a Web-based lawyer referral service, in Pennsylvania, Illinois, and California. The goal was to make legal services available to individuals and small businesses who typically cannot afford them and do not qualify for legal aid. Bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois bitterly opposed the program, however.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2011 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calling Villanova University Law School's grade-inflation scandal reprehensible and damaging, the American Bar Association on Tuesday censured the school for releasing fraudulent admissions data but also lauded it for acting quickly to disclose the problem. The bar association said that the law school would retain its accreditation. The ABA section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar said that the infractions were serious enough to warrant removing the school's accreditation but that Villanova's quick action to correct the problem made that step unnecessary.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Richard H. Markowitz, 90, of Meadowbrook, a Philadelphia labor lawyer, died Sunday, Aug. 14, of renal failure at his home. Mr. Markowitz came from a family that immigrated to the United States from Austria-Hungary in the early 1880s. His father, Samuel H. Markowitz, who was born in Pottstown in 1892, became a Reform rabbi. Richard Markowitz grew up in Fort Wayne, Ind., and Elmira, N.Y. He graduated from the Elmira Free Academy in 1942. Although his college studies were interrupted by service in the Navy, he graduated from Yale University with a bachelor's degree in economics.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Roger Dennis, dean of the Thomas R. Kline School of Law of Drexel University, plans to retire in June of 2017, university provost M. Brian Blake announced in a letter to the faculty and staff on Wednesday. Dennis is the founding dean of the law school, which opened its doors in 2007 and he was instrumental in seeing it through the American Bar Association accreditation process, completed in 2011. Blake said Dennis agreed to stay while the university conducts a national search for his replacement.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
The American Bar Association has backed off a plan to offer lower-cost legal services to small businesses and individuals after pushback from bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois. The ABA launched the pilot project last October with Rocket Lawyer, a Web-based lawyer referral service, in Pennsylvania, Illinois, and California. The goal was to make legal services available to individuals and small businesses who typically cannot afford them and do not qualify for legal aid. Bar leaders in Pennsylvania and Illinois bitterly opposed the program, however.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Dana Milbank
Just in time for the 2016 election, the Roberts Supreme Court has found yet another way to stack the deck in favor of the rich. By all appearances at Monday's argument, the five Republican-appointed justices are ready to upend a 40-year precedent guiding labor relations in favor of a new approach that will deplete public-sector unions' finances and reduce their political clout. The case, from California, involves arcane issues of "agency fees" and member opt-outs, but make no mistake: This is about campaign finance, and, in particular, propping up the Republican Party.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania bar regulator Paul Burgoyne has been elected president of the National Organization of Bar Counsel. Burgoyne serves as deputy chief disciplinary counsel of the state Supreme Court's lawyer disciplinary board. The board makes recommendations to the Supreme Court on attorney disciplinary matters, including on whether lawyers should be suspended or disbarred. The National Organization of Bar Counsel is a professional group that represents lawyers from agencies that regulate lawyers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Federal authorities recently charged former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver with collecting kickbacks disguised as "referral fees. " This will have a familiar ring to many Pennsylvanians, and not just the part about a power broker taking a perp walk. Referral fees were also part of the disciplinary investigation of Seamus McCaffery, who left the commonwealth's highest court under pressure last year. It's no coincidence that referral fees, which lawyers pay to other lawyers who send them cases, have come up more than once in ethically questionable (albeit factually distinct)
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Greenlee, the longtime head of the Defender Association of Philadelphia, who began her professional life as a high school language teacher and went on to develop and expand one of the nation's most prominent public-interest law agencies, on Tuesday announced her retirement effective March 1, 2015. Greenlee has served for 40 years with the association, which provides legal representation to thousands of low-income people in Philadelphia each year. For about 25 years, she has been chief defender.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
So this is what history looks like in real time. For nearly 231 years, lawyers for Rawle & Henderson L.L.P. have been plying courthouses in Philadelphia for clients with urgent legal needs, and that would make it the oldest law firm in the United States. Fittingly, its offices at 13th and Chestnut Streets are redolent of its deep ties to the past. An oil portrait of name partner Joseph Henderson, a onetime president of the American Bar Association, hangs prominently. On display nearby is a letter from Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton to firm founder William Rawle, delicately inquiring about progress in a case.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK Rutgers University president Robert L. Barchi announced a plan a year ago to merge its two law schools, with the ambitious goal of having students this fall enter a unified program. Then came the basketball scandal, which caused personnel changes, including the Newark campus' law dean becoming the university's top lawyer. And then the Camden law school dean announced his coming departure to fill the newly created post of campus provost. At the same time, leadership shuffling at both campuses meant new chancellors would oversee the transition.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. Carter, 78, of Philadelphia, a pioneer and leader for more than 40 years in the field of continuing education for lawyers, died Monday, Jan. 27, of heart failure at his home. Mr. Carter came to Philadelphia in 1993 to serve as executive director of the American Law Institute-American Bar Association Committee on Continuing Professional Education. The group is a national provider of continuing legal education. Colleague Michael Greenwald said Mr. Carter was a comfortable person with whom to work.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|