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American Cancer Society

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NEWS
March 19, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
They were "wearing the green" for the American Cancer Society on Saturday at the Marriott West in Conshohocken. The event, a silent auction, dinner and dance, was the 14th year the Gaelic Gala has been held, and more than 250 people attended. Vin Gordon, Wayne, president of the organization, was master of ceremonies. On the committee were Chris Aldworth, Roseanne DeSpirito, Ellen Panaro, Jean and Steve Ruckman, Judy Scancella, all of King of Prussia; Don Blackburn, Sheila and Paul Gaffney, Debbie Gordon, Mary Maro, Bev McGloin, Mary Richards, Erna Schultz, Jill Wellman, and Jeanne Whitmore, all of Wayne; Gail Hough, Gulph Mills; Eileen McCue, Paoli, and Pat Mitchell, Malvern.
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the time, the Ben Franklin Bridge spans a river, carrying automobiles, buses, and trucks. But on Sunday morning, the bridge became a river - a river of bicycle spokes sparkling like water in the morning sun, a river of colored jerseys, each catching the light, but most important, a river of stories. Because, if there was anything that united the 4,200 or more riders who embarked on Sunday's 66.2-mile American Cancer Society's Bike-a-thon to raise $1.7 million for cancer research, it was the story behind every ride.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | By Christine Schiavo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The world around Angela Deon is pink and animated. Mickey Mouse dangles from marionette strings tacked to the ceiling. Ariel the Little Mermaid overlooks shelves of bound fairy tales. And Beauty and the Beast dance across a fluffy bedspread. "I love my room," said the 4-year-old. "I want it all pink. I want to paint pink carousel horses and merry-go-rounds on the walls. " In her room, the world is bright and rosy. But Angela knows what life is like outside a little girl's fantasy.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The name resale shop usually conjures up images of drab polyester shirts from the 1970s and ill-fitting golf pants. But at the Rediscovery Shop in the Valley Forge Shopping Center, that dreary concept is replaced with heavy wool sweaters and tailored linen business suits less than five years old. And the merchandise is all sold to help fight cancer. The King of Prussia Rediscovery Shop is one of two American Cancer Society businesses in Pennsylvania - the other is in Frazer - that raise money for cancer research.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Long-awaited federal rules announced Thursday that will ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products were greeted with outrage from the industry and applause from many, but not all, health advocates. The controversial regulations could have a particular impact in Pennsylvania, the only state besides Michigan with no age limit for e-cigarette sales. The Keystone State "should be dramatically affected for the better by the new federal law," said Cliff Douglas, vice president for tobacco control with the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / SHARON GEKOSKI
TAKING A SWING, Paul Budd of Woodbury plays in the Ralph Cornell Memorial Golf Tournament at the Woodbury Country Club. The tournament Thursday raised money for the Gloucester County Unit of the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
June 27, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Vicki Valerio
As Nick Forgione, 74, rode his bicycle yesterday up to the Fraternal Order of Police lodge, he reached a remarkable mark - 50,000 miles pedaled in the last 12 years. At the lodge, FOP president Richard Costello presented Forgione, a retired Highway Patrol officer, with a $500 check for the American Cancer Society. Forgione is a cancer survivor who has had a colostomy. He says he bikes to give inspiration to cancer patients.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / BOB HILL
With an eye on eating and nutrition, MaryAnn Ellsworth offers Danny Petrusky, 4, a sample from a tray of fresh vegetables and fruit at the Super Fresh market in Glassboro. His mother, Renee, looks on. The American Cancer Society sponsored an "Eat Smart" demonstration at the supermarket on Friday, with help from the Gloucester County Health Department.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / JOHN SLEEZER
Tap-dancing across the finish line at John F. Kennedy Stadium, Liz Ursic (left) and D.B. Symmez finish the Broad Street Run with a flourish. The two women said they danced the entire 10-mile route. About 3,300 people participated in the run, which started yesterday at Central High School, Broad Street and Somerville Avenue. They raised money for the American Cancer Society through sponsors who paid for each mile completed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
When an influential federal panel recommended in 2012 that doctors omit prostate cancer screening from routine health care, it set off a firestorm. Many men and their doctors seem to have heeded the advice, though the long-term implications won't be clear for a while, a new analysis suggests. The advice of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force appears to have led to a sizable drop in screening with the PSA blood test, and in diagnosis of early-stage prostate cancer, according to American Cancer Society researchers who have been monitoring the trends.
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Long-awaited federal rules announced Thursday that will ban e-cigarette sales to minors and require safety reviews for vaping products were greeted with outrage from the industry and applause from many, but not all, health advocates. The controversial regulations could have a particular impact in Pennsylvania, the only state besides Michigan with no age limit for e-cigarette sales. The Keystone State "should be dramatically affected for the better by the new federal law," said Cliff Douglas, vice president for tobacco control with the American Cancer Society.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
IT'S DOUBTFUL that the pint of Fireball cinnamon whiskey was included in the goodie bags of healthy fruit, granola, water, and yogurt distributed to the soggy, ebullient runners at the end of the Blue Cross Broad Street Run. But it was just what the doctor ordered, passed among the sodden, the brave, and the teary-eyed, punchy with cold, fatigue, and memories at the American Cancer Society's DetermiNation tent. If there's any truism about Sunday's Broad Street Run, it's that nearly every runner had a story.
NEWS
April 20, 2016 | By Tia Yang, Staff Writer
John J. O'Neill, 89, of Blue Bell, a lead computer programmer on the Gemini space program in the 1960s, died of complications of cancer Monday, April 11, at Normandy Farms Estates. Mr. O'Neill was born in Philadelphia and raised in Easton, Pa. After high school, he served as a corpsman in the Navy on the Tranquillity during World War II. The Tranquillity saw action in the Pacific transporting wounded personnel. After his service, Mr. O'Neill attended Temple University, where he met his wife, Claire.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
On April 9, the Philly NCAA Division I men's basketball coaches hosted the 13th annual Coaches vs. Cancer Gala at Philadelphia Park Hyatt at the Bellevue. Coaches vs. Cancer is a nationwide partnership with the American Cancer Society and the National Association of Basketball Coaches that engages coaches and their teams and communities to join the fight against cancer. The more than 550 attendees included St. Joseph's coach Phil Martelli, Temple's Fran Dunphy, Penn's Steve Donahue, La Salle's John Giannini, and, of course, Jay Wright, coach of the 2016 national champions, the Villanova Wildcats.
NEWS
April 10, 2016
Q. I have been diagnosed with cancer. What is going to happen now? A. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015 there were an estimated 1.6 million new cancer cases diagnosed and 590,430 cancer deaths in the United States. After a cancer diagnosis, you may be unsure about what comes next. For many, the toughest parts are learning to cope with the diagnosis and understanding the types of cancer and the treatment process. A cancer diagnosis will also bring many changes for you and your loved ones.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Helen Felsenthal, 81, of Merion, an educator and two-time breast cancer survivor honored for her volunteer work with other mastectomy patients, died Friday, March 4, of Alzheimer's disease at her second home in Bradley Beach, N.J. A resident of Philadelphia since 1973, Dr. Felsenthal taught at every level - from elementary school to graduate education at the University of Pennsylvania, said her husband, Norman. Born and reared in Pittsburgh, she was the seventh of eight children and the only one to pursue higher education.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
John R. Favorite, 69, of Moorestown, was a theatrical director at Burlington County Footlighters in Cinnaminson from the 1960s into the 1980s. "Sometimes he would direct, sometimes he would act," but he was better known as a director there, brother Tim said. During those years, Tim Favorite said, "he spent some time in Hollywood. " Mr. Favorite had speaking parts in two 1975 Roger Corman-produced movies, Capone, starring Ben Gazzara, and Death Race 2000, starring David Carradine.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
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