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American Cardinals

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NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Jason Horowitz, Washington Post
VATICAN CITY - The College of Cardinals that will elect the next pope cut off formal communications with the news media Wednesday after its private deliberations emerged in the Italian press, raising the specter of a leaking scandal that cast a pall over the last year in office of Pope Benedict XVI. "Concern was expressed in the General Congregation about leaks of confidential proceedings reported in Italian newspapers," said Sister Mary Ann Walsh,...
NEWS
April 24, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Using his strongest language to date, Pope John Paul II yesterday condemned sex abuse of children by priests, declaring that "there is no place in the priesthood . . . for those who would harm the young. " "Because of the great harm done by some priests and religious, the church is viewed with distrust," he told 12 U.S. cardinals summoned to the Vatican to explain why so many sex-abuse scandals had rocked American dioceses in recent decades, especially this year. "The abuse which has caused this crisis is by every standard wrong . . . a crime . . . and an appalling sin," he declared in English during a morning session with the cardinals in his personal library.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | BY ROCCO PALMO & SEAN COLLINS WALSH, For the Daily News Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CARDINAL Justin Rigali, the former archbishop of Philadelphia, is the only papal elector with strong local ties - but his role in the conclave may not be limited to a single tally. Rigali, a Los Angeles native, is playing a big role in unifying the American cardinals and unlocking their potential influence over who will be the next pope. Despite being the second-largest national group in the conclave for decades, Americans have not traditionally wielded much clout behind the closed doors of the Sistine Chapel - in part because they rarely voted as a bloc.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Pio Laghi, a Vatican diplomat, is expected to convey to President Bush today Pope John Paul's II opposition to a U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Cardinal Laghi, a former papal representative to the United States, is carrying a letter from John Paul to Bush. "Some say the war has already begun. We don't believe it," the cardinal said Monday in Rome. He arrived in Washington yesterday. Although their meeting will be private, Cardinal Laghi is expected to make public remarks as he leaves the White House.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Ann Rodgers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
VATICAN CITY - The silent video, reminiscent of 8mm home movies of the 1960s, showed a gardener hoeing a plot of earth, as if rooting out spent plants and preparing for spring. But the garden was at the Vatican, where workers destroyed a floral rendition of the papal shield of Pope Benedict XVI one week after his abdication. "So that is removed, waiting for the new pope," said the Rev. Thomas Rosica, a Canadian priest providing English and French summaries for the Rev. Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Summoned by Pope John Paul II, eight American cardinals will travel to Rome this week for one of the most unusual gatherings of high prelates in the history of the Roman Catholic Church. There, they will spend Tuesday and Wednesday devising a response to the recent clergy sex-abuse scandals that have rocked the American branch of the church and eroded the moral prestige of its leadership. The meeting itself is rare, and so is its suddenness. Pope John Paul summoned the cardinals only on Monday - a nanosecond ago in the normally glacial pace of the Vatican.
NEWS
April 23, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Leaders of America's Roman Catholic Church continued to arrive in Rome yesterday, amid reports that they are divided over whether one of their number, Boston's Cardinal Bernard Law, should be removed. They were accompanied by a large troupe of reporters and camera crews, attesting to intense U.S. interest in the extraordinary Vatican summit on child sex abuse set to begin today. Twelve American cardinals will meet with Pope John Paul II and Vatican officials to craft a response they hope will win back the trust of U.S. Catholics, badly shaken by the months of revelations about clerical abuse and church cover-ups.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II is expected to name at least 20 new cardinals this week, and church observers speculate that Philadelphia Archbishop Anthony J. Bevilacqua has an even chance of being among them. The archbishop said after celebrating Mass for charismatic Catholics at Villanova University Friday night that he had received no word from the Vatican about his getting a red hat. But prelates who are named to the College of Cardinals, which elects new popes, are given little advance notice of their appointments, according to church sources.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Ann Rodgers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
ROME - On a day when they preached on the prodigal son who returns home after a life of sin, the American cardinals were in high spirits and good humor as they called on fallen-away Catholics to return. Their homilies took on added meaning as they prepared to enter the conclave Tuesday to vote on a successor to Pope Benedict XVI, who resigned on Feb. 28. Each cardinal is assigned a church in Rome because, historically, the cardinals were the clergy of Rome. Having a titular church - for which their chief responsibility is fund-raising - allows them to be clergy of Rome.
NEWS
April 26, 2002
On Wednesday, reeling from scandal, smarting from the ultimate calling-on-the-carpet in Rome before Pope John Paul II, the American cardinals of the Catholic Church released a statement. If this piece of prose, awaited with such hope and anxiety by the faithful, had been an animal, it would have been a field mouse in an elephant costume. It was that disappointing. Whoever wrote, or rewrote, this statement seems not to understand the danger facing the church. The authors write as though harm might someday come.
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NEWS
March 13, 2013 | BY ROCCO PALMO & SEAN COLLINS WALSH, For the Daily News Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
CARDINAL Justin Rigali, the former archbishop of Philadelphia, is the only papal elector with strong local ties - but his role in the conclave may not be limited to a single tally. Rigali, a Los Angeles native, is playing a big role in unifying the American cardinals and unlocking their potential influence over who will be the next pope. Despite being the second-largest national group in the conclave for decades, Americans have not traditionally wielded much clout behind the closed doors of the Sistine Chapel - in part because they rarely voted as a bloc.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Ann Rodgers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
ROME - On a day when they preached on the prodigal son who returns home after a life of sin, the American cardinals were in high spirits and good humor as they called on fallen-away Catholics to return. Their homilies took on added meaning as they prepared to enter the conclave Tuesday to vote on a successor to Pope Benedict XVI, who resigned on Feb. 28. Each cardinal is assigned a church in Rome because, historically, the cardinals were the clergy of Rome. Having a titular church - for which their chief responsibility is fund-raising - allows them to be clergy of Rome.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Ann Rodgers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
VATICAN CITY - The silent video, reminiscent of 8mm home movies of the 1960s, showed a gardener hoeing a plot of earth, as if rooting out spent plants and preparing for spring. But the garden was at the Vatican, where workers destroyed a floral rendition of the papal shield of Pope Benedict XVI one week after his abdication. "So that is removed, waiting for the new pope," said the Rev. Thomas Rosica, a Canadian priest providing English and French summaries for the Rev. Federico Lombardi, the Vatican spokesman.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Jason Horowitz, Washington Post
VATICAN CITY - The College of Cardinals that will elect the next pope cut off formal communications with the news media Wednesday after its private deliberations emerged in the Italian press, raising the specter of a leaking scandal that cast a pall over the last year in office of Pope Benedict XVI. "Concern was expressed in the General Congregation about leaks of confidential proceedings reported in Italian newspapers," said Sister Mary Ann Walsh,...
NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
Last Friday morning, Cardinal Avery Dulles died in New York. Dulles was one of the world's preeminent theologians and intellectuals. As such, his absence will be noticed in the public square. His passing also marks the end of a very particular kind of American life. The Dulles clan was never quite royalty, but it was, in its way, an American version of the British nobility. Three of Avery Dulles' forebears were secretaries of state. His father had an airport named after him, and his uncle was director of the CIA. Born in 1918, Dulles was educated in Switzerland and then at Choate Rosemary Hall before being packed off to Harvard.
NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the eve of Pope Benedict XVI's arrival in the United States, Cardinal Justin Rigali yesterday predicted that the pontiff would use his five-day visit to Washington and New York City to "encourage and uplift" the American people. "We can expect, with this pope, a wonderful rapport with the people," Rigali told a morning news conference. He said he did not think Benedict would directly address sensitive political issues, such as the United States' occupation of Iraq, during his stay, but instead come "to present principles," such as peace and to "proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ.
NEWS
April 13, 2005 | By Ken Dilanian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vatican's decision to have Cardinal Bernard Law preside at a high-profile mourning Mass for Pope John Paul II on Monday is the latest example of the disconnect between senior church officials and many U.S. Catholics on the priest-abuse scandal. While the Pope and other senior Vatican officials repeatedly condemned child sex abuse by priests and endorsed efforts by American bishops to combat it, they never saw the revelations of recent years as the enormous, confidence-shattering event that many Americans did, Vatican-watchers say. "For Americans . . ., it takes a very small thing to kind of reopen a wound," said the Rev. Thomas Williams, the American dean of the school of theology at Regina Apostolorum Pontifical University in Rome.
NEWS
April 11, 2005 | By Matthew Schofield and Patricia Montemurri INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Three years ago, Cardinal Bernard Law was at the center of the Roman Catholic Church's sexual-abuse scandal in Boston. Today, he will take center stage in the Catholic world. Law will say today's Mass of mourning for the late Pope John Paul II at St. Peter's Basilica, one of nine such services being conducted by the Vatican. Being selected is an honor bestowed only on the most influential members of the church's hierarchy. But to victims of sexual abuse at the hands of priests, it is a sign that the church has not come to grips with a very dark period in its recent history.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Pio Laghi, a Vatican diplomat, is expected to convey to President Bush today Pope John Paul's II opposition to a U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Cardinal Laghi, a former papal representative to the United States, is carrying a letter from John Paul to Bush. "Some say the war has already begun. We don't believe it," the cardinal said Monday in Rome. He arrived in Washington yesterday. Although their meeting will be private, Cardinal Laghi is expected to make public remarks as he leaves the White House.
NEWS
June 8, 2002
Better. Much better. But not quite there yet. The American bishops of the Catholic Church this week proposed an action plan for dealing with the horrific stain that priestly abuse of children has brought upon the institution - and the horrific pain brought to victims, their families and the faithful. In fact, one of the best things about the bishops' statement is that its focus clearly is protecting children and helping victims, not merely preserving the church from scandal.
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