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NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By ANTHONY J. BEVILACQUA and JAMES T. McHUGH
Imagine for a moment that the year is 1844. The sun is beating down on the burly Irish bricklayers assembled by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia for an unusual contest. On this day, the archdiocese is conducting a brick-throwing contest to mark the height of the new cathedral's windows, the height at which the windows will be safe from the anti-Catholic violence and vandalism of the day. In 1990, it is even more inconceivable that this same anti-Catholic feeling continues to exist.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Francis' arrival in Philadelphia this month comes as Roman Catholicism is losing some of its hold among young Americans, a new national survey finds, and when many Catholics disagree with their church on a broad array of family teachings. With more than a quarter of American Catholics divorced, and 44 percent reporting they have cohabited with a romantic partner without being married, "most American Catholics are comfortable with family arrangements that have been traditionally frowned upon by the church," according to a new poll by the Pew Research Center.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | By Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writer
The Catholic leaders of the Philadelphia and Camden dioceses joined today to denounce a phrase in a recent newspaper column as "an insult to 57 million American Catholics and an affront to all Americans of every faith. " The Philadelphia Inquirer column, labeled "Commentary" and written by David R. Boldt, editor of the paper's editorial page, appeared July 1. The phrase cited by the bishops was Boldt's description of the church as "an un-American institution. " In an unusual joint press conference at the rectory of the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul on Logan Square, Philadelphia Archbishop Anthony Bevilacqua and Camden Bishop James McHugh issued a three-page statement in which they cited contributions by American Catholics to the nation and said: "There is no conflict between being American and being Catholic and never has been.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When some American Catholics look toward the Vatican, they see more than an ocean in between. What they believe they see is a huge gulf of misunderstanding more difficult to bridge than any physical barrier. When Pope John Paul II arrives in the United States this week for a 10-day visit, he will find a flock with many members who do not believe that he really knows what they are all about. But in a church where disagreement has become a way of life in recent years, that belief is not universal.
NEWS
November 4, 1993 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
When American Catholics enter the voting booths, they leave their religious convictions outside. I believe this is due to the fact that they fear any hint that the separation of church and state has been violated. No other religious group feels that way: hence the ease with which black politicians mount the pulpits of Baptist churches in Philadelphia during political campaigns. What evidence is there that American Catholics are fearful of having their religious convictions influence their voting?
NEWS
April 26, 2005
WHEN YOU say in your April 20 editorial that the cardinals "opted to continue the Euro-(and American) centric fight against modern Western culture," you are showing an ignorance of the trends in the Roman Catholic Church. It is in the emerging nations of Africa and Asia where the church has dynamic growth that it is most conservative. It is in the weakening "Euro-(and American) centric" areas where some are calling for change. Don't kid yourself by presuming that even most American Catholics are looking for dramatic change.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush had an audience yesterday with Pope John Paul II in Rome, but his real audience may have been at home, where he is battling Democratic Sen. John Kerry for the votes of American Catholics. Three factors combine to make Roman Catholics a potentially pivotal bloc in the election: They are the country's largest religious denomination, 65 million strong. They are a major presence in battleground states such as Pennsylvania and Ohio. And they are split evenly between Democrats and Republicans, the only denomination so closely divided.
NEWS
October 3, 1995 | By George H. Gallup Jr. and Robert Bezilla
Pope John Paul II enjoys enormous popularity among the American Catholics he will be visiting starting tomorrow, but those who respect his spirituality often dissent from his teachings. Three Catholics in four (73 percent) say they approve of the Pope's performance as leader of their church. But just as many (77 percent) follow their own conscience rather than his guidance when faced with difficult moral questions. By visiting the urbanized Northeast, the Pope will be playing to the strength of his church.
NEWS
September 12, 1994 | By Richard Cohen
"How many divisions does the Pope have?" Stalin is said to have asked. The answer, as Stalin well knew, is none - which doesn't mean that the Vatican doesn't have enormous influence. It used that influence - and a bit more - when it helped bring down a communist regime in Poland. But Stalin's question, posed in another context, is still valid: Who listens to the Pope when it comes to family planning? Almost no one, it turns out. Italy, home to the Vatican and almost entirely Catholic, has one of the lowest birth rates in the world, partly because it has abortion on demand in the first trimester - and it's free.
NEWS
November 13, 1996 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Its very name is viewed as a provocation, if not a contradiction. That hasn't stopped Catholics for Free Choice and its president, Frances Kissling, from advocating abortion and reproductive rights from what they consider a Catholic perspective. Kissling traveled to Philadelphia last night to accept, on behalf of the organization, the Justice Harry A. Blackmun Reproductive Freedom Award from the Philadelphia Family Planning Council. The award is named for the retired Supreme Court justice who wrote the Roe vs. Wade decision legalizing abortion.
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NEWS
September 4, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Francis' arrival in Philadelphia this month comes as Roman Catholicism is losing some of its hold among young Americans, a new national survey finds, and when many Catholics disagree with their church on a broad array of family teachings. With more than a quarter of American Catholics divorced, and 44 percent reporting they have cohabited with a romantic partner without being married, "most American Catholics are comfortable with family arrangements that have been traditionally frowned upon by the church," according to a new poll by the Pew Research Center.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
For Philadelphia's Catholic leaders, Pope Francis' announcement that he will visit the city was worthy of a Rocky dance - the one where the fictional boxer bounces on the balls of his feet, fists raised in the air, just after conquering the Art Museum steps. Fittingly, the organizers of the Catholic Church's World Meeting of Families chose the Art Museum's Grand Hall, just a few feet from the famous steps, to relay the news. It was the culmination of months of efforts to secure the pope's attendance, including a trip to Rome by Archbishop Charles Chaput, Mayor Nutter, and Gov. Corbett.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Religion makes a lot of mistakes. Faith traditions can be so harsh that they drive away everyone but the self-righteous scolds. Or they can so indulge in therapeutic comfort and manufactured joy that they come to seem like a charlatan's game. They can be so otherworldly that they offer no guidance to those living in this one on matters of justice, freedom, and how we should live together. Or they are so captive to the here and now that it becomes hard to distinguish between a congregation and a party headquarters.
NEWS
March 31, 2011
By Jonathan Zimmerman Stop the spread of sharia law! Ban gay marriage and abortion! As the 2012 elections inch closer, GOP lawmakers and presidential hopefuls are tripping over each other to denounce the alleged threat posed by Islam to the American body politic. They're also trying to rally so-called values voters with appeals to conservative cultural themes, especially on marriage and reproduction. Memo to Republicans: Muslims are cultural conservatives, too. And if you can stop maligning them for a moment, they might move over to your column.
NEWS
November 23, 2008 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On his way to a decisive victory, Barack Obama won a majority of the nation's Catholic voters, a closely watched swing group that has sided with the winner in nine of the last 10 presidential elections. He won despite the preaching of some conservative bishops that it would be wrong to vote for a candidate who supports abortion rights, as Obama does, and after a years-long effort by Democrats to close their party's persistent "God gap" with the Republicans among religious voters.
NEWS
April 26, 2005
WHEN YOU say in your April 20 editorial that the cardinals "opted to continue the Euro-(and American) centric fight against modern Western culture," you are showing an ignorance of the trends in the Roman Catholic Church. It is in the emerging nations of Africa and Asia where the church has dynamic growth that it is most conservative. It is in the weakening "Euro-(and American) centric" areas where some are calling for change. Don't kid yourself by presuming that even most American Catholics are looking for dramatic change.
NEWS
April 24, 2005 | By Patricia Montemurri INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Pope Benedict XVI yesterday thanked the news media for its coverage of the papal transition and said he would continue the late Pope John Paul II's dialogue with the media. The Pope acknowledged the modern media's ability to reach "the whole of humanity" and underscored what he called journalists' "ethical responsibilities" as part of a "sincere search for the truth and the safeguarding of the centrality and the dignity of the person. " The Pope, who until a few days ago was known as Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, met with reporters in Pope Paul VI Hall for about 15 minutes but did not take questions, unlike John Paul II, whose first news conference lasted 40 minutes.
NEWS
April 6, 2005
Pope John Paul II Some readers' thoughts on his life, his legacy and his policies. Daniel Deagler of Plumsteadville: For many years - in fact for most of American history - the popes seemed to be an endless succession of odd-looking Italian men. To many American Catholics, they were mysterious and foreign. The Polish pope, John Paul II, was different. He was fair, rugged and handsome. He looked remarkably like one of us. In a suit and tie he would have looked like a Wall Street banker or a U.S. senator.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
President Bush had an audience yesterday with Pope John Paul II in Rome, but his real audience may have been at home, where he is battling Democratic Sen. John Kerry for the votes of American Catholics. Three factors combine to make Roman Catholics a potentially pivotal bloc in the election: They are the country's largest religious denomination, 65 million strong. They are a major presence in battleground states such as Pennsylvania and Ohio. And they are split evenly between Democrats and Republicans, the only denomination so closely divided.
NEWS
April 3, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In a rare joint Good Friday statement, the nation's Roman Catholic bishops called on the nation's 60 million Catholics to help put an end to capital punishment. "We see the death penalty as perpetuating a cycle of violence and promoting a sense of vengeance in our culture," the bishops' statement said. "We cannot teach that killing is wrong by killing. " The statement from the Administrative Board of the U.S. Catholic Conference said that "for more than 25 years, the Catholic bishops of the United States have called for an end to the death penalty in our land.
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