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NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Michael Matza and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
Urging Congress to overhaul the immigration system or risk losing in global workforce competition, Philadelphia business and community leaders rallied Wednesday on Independence Mall, releasing fresh state-by-state data on the economic impact of foreign-born newcomers and launching a campaign they call Reason for Reform. Rob Wonderling, president and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, called on elected officials to "enact policies and reforms that will support immigration as critical [to]
NEWS
December 8, 2011 | BY JULIE SHAW, shawj@phillynews.com 215-854-2592
ANISSA MALLORY knows what it's like to live in poverty. The 20-year-old Kensington mother of 1-year-old twins, a boy and a girl, says she and her husband "survive day-to-day," but also have to sacrifice. "It's hard to keep up with the bills and rent," she said. Although they're able to feed the kids, she and her husband will forgo buying new clothes or sneakers. Mallory, a home-health aide, says they make about $19,000 a year - including welfare. They live in north Kensington, an area of the city with the largest cluster of people living below the poverty line, according to a Daily News analysis of census estimates being released today.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Illustrating the gap between wealth and poverty in the area, new census data shows that in Philadelphia's impoverished Fairhill section, residents have median household incomes of $14,185 a year - 1/12 that of the richest region in the area, Chester County's Birmingham Township. The median household income in Birmingham, a bedroom community of financiers, lawyers, and other professionals 32 miles west of Center City, is $171,689, according to estimates compiled between 2009 and 2013 in the newly released American Community Survey from the Census Bureau.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
March 23, 2010 | By Afton Branche
The census forms Americans are getting in the mail could be crucial to economic recovery, especially in the Philadelphia area. Indeed, if the count isn't complete, it could spell disaster, preventing local and state governments from getting adequate federal funding and discouraging businesses from investing in communities. And yet most people in Philadelphia and around the country are not hearing nearly enough about this once-in-a-decade chance to attract new investment, spur growth, and boost job creation.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  As the government looks ahead to the 2020 census, some civic leaders are seeking changes they say will paint a more vivid picture of an increasingly diverse United States. "Race and Ethnicity in the 2020 Census: Improving Data to Capture a Multiethnic America," a report released last month by the Leadership Conference Education Fund, a coalition of 200 civil rights groups, promotes a series of changes in how the data on race and ethnicity are gathered by the census and its companion American Community Survey.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of children living in poverty in Delaware County increased by 30 percent between 2008 and 2012, according to a new report. Around 21,000 children 17 and under were living in poverty in the county in 2012, according to the report by Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY), a youth advocacy and research nonprofit in Philadelphia. That's a county child-poverty rate of 16.7 percent, PCCY reported. According to the agency's calculations, the Delaware County child-poverty rate is the highest among the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, PCCY officials said at a news conference in the food pantry at the Bernardine Center in Chester on Monday.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Hope Yen, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - After more than a century, the Census Bureau is dropping its use of the word Negro to describe black Americans in surveys. Instead of the term that came into use during the Jim Crow era of segregation, census forms will use the more modern labels "black" or "African American. " The change will take effect next year when the Census Bureau distributes its annual American Community Survey to more than 3.5 million U.S. households, Nicholas Jones, chief of the bureau's racial statistics branch, said in an interview.
NEWS
October 26, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deep poverty appears to be accelerating in Delaware and Camden Counties, as the poorest of the poor scramble for rent, heat, and food. In the city of Chester, Donald Grover, 47, and his wife, Melissa Zirilli, 43, can't do their jobs - he because the home-remodeling firm he works for cut his time from 60 hours a week to nearly nothing, she because debilitating seizures keep her from being a nurse's aide. In the city of Camden, Mark Woodall, 49, once a construction worker and a trained cook, now makes $10 an hour in a soup kitchen as he and his out-of-work fiancee are forced to live on a street he says is thronged with armed teenagers "without morals.
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NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Michael Matza and Vibha Kannan, STAFF WRITERS
Urging Congress to overhaul the immigration system or risk losing in global workforce competition, Philadelphia business and community leaders rallied Wednesday on Independence Mall, releasing fresh state-by-state data on the economic impact of foreign-born newcomers and launching a campaign they call Reason for Reform. Rob Wonderling, president and CEO of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce, called on elected officials to "enact policies and reforms that will support immigration as critical [to]
NEWS
October 1, 2015 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has the highest rate of deep poverty among America's 10 biggest cities, an examination of federal data by The Inquirer shows. The city is already the poorest in that group. Deep poverty is measured as income of 50 percent or less of the poverty rate. A family of four living in deep poverty takes in $12,000 or less annually, half the poverty rate of $24,000 for a family that size. Philadelphia's deep-poverty rate is 12.3 percent, or around 186,000 people - 60,000 of whom are children, an examination of the newly released U.S. Census 2014 American Community Survey shows.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  As the government looks ahead to the 2020 census, some civic leaders are seeking changes they say will paint a more vivid picture of an increasingly diverse United States. "Race and Ethnicity in the 2020 Census: Improving Data to Capture a Multiethnic America," a report released last month by the Leadership Conference Education Fund, a coalition of 200 civil rights groups, promotes a series of changes in how the data on race and ethnicity are gathered by the census and its companion American Community Survey.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Illustrating the gap between wealth and poverty in the area, new census data shows that in Philadelphia's impoverished Fairhill section, residents have median household incomes of $14,185 a year - 1/12 that of the richest region in the area, Chester County's Birmingham Township. The median household income in Birmingham, a bedroom community of financiers, lawyers, and other professionals 32 miles west of Center City, is $171,689, according to estimates compiled between 2009 and 2013 in the newly released American Community Survey from the Census Bureau.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Community improvement projects across the region have lost hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal funding after the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development changed its low- and moderate-income maps in the middle of the grant process. The update, which happened in June, took some local officials by surprise and has them scrambling to find money for such projects as a pedestrian bridge at a Hatboro-Horsham school and improvements to the Ambler Community Center. Montgomery County had already selected the projects to fund when HUD updated the maps.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
BABIES ARE fueling an increase in the city's population, according to new estimates released today by the Census Bureau. From the April 2010 census to July 1, 2013, Philadelphia's population increased by an estimated 27,159 people, which represents a 1.8 percent jump. Much of that was due to net births - births minus deaths. The city also got a boost from immigration. An estimated 23,000 more people came to the city from out of the country in those three years than city residents who left the country.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
IN A CITY already struggling with a high poverty rate, some Asian ethnic groups are faring worse than the average. About 41 percent of Cambodians in Philadelphia are in poverty, as are about 33 percent of Chinese (not including those from Taiwan), and about 31 percent of Vietnamese. In contrast, the poverty rate for Philadelphia as a whole was 25 percent in the Census Bureau's 2006-10 American Community Survey estimates, used for the poverty figures. The findings were highlighted in a new report, A Community of Contrasts: Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders in the Northeast , released yesterday by a consortium of Asian-American organizations.
NEWS
December 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano and John Duchneskie, Inquirer Staff Writers
Poverty has increased a startling 62 percent in the communities of Lower Northeast Philadelphia since 1999. At the same time, poverty increased 42 percent in Roxborough and Manayunk, while declining 13 percent in South Philadelphia. Those findings come from an Inquirer comparison of 2000 census figures with new data released Tuesday by the Census Bureau. The new federal data were contained in the American Community Survey (ACS), a compilation of information collected from 24.5 million people nationwide between 2008 to 2012.
NEWS
November 27, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number of children living in poverty in Delaware County increased by 30 percent between 2008 and 2012, according to a new report. Around 21,000 children 17 and under were living in poverty in the county in 2012, according to the report by Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY), a youth advocacy and research nonprofit in Philadelphia. That's a county child-poverty rate of 16.7 percent, PCCY reported. According to the agency's calculations, the Delaware County child-poverty rate is the highest among the four Pennsylvania suburban counties, PCCY officials said at a news conference in the food pantry at the Bernardine Center in Chester on Monday.
NEWS
October 26, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Deep poverty appears to be accelerating in Delaware and Camden Counties, as the poorest of the poor scramble for rent, heat, and food. In the city of Chester, Donald Grover, 47, and his wife, Melissa Zirilli, 43, can't do their jobs - he because the home-remodeling firm he works for cut his time from 60 hours a week to nearly nothing, she because debilitating seizures keep her from being a nurse's aide. In the city of Camden, Mark Woodall, 49, once a construction worker and a trained cook, now makes $10 an hour in a soup kitchen as he and his out-of-work fiancee are forced to live on a street he says is thronged with armed teenagers "without morals.
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