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NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It takes serious materials to run a tournament for nearly 4,000 people who are serious about bridge. Along with the plasma screens and card tables, the 25 tons of supplies include 30,000 golf pencils, 19 pounds of rubber bands, and 20,000 decks of cards. For the players who will participate in the American Contract Bridge League's summer North American Bridge Championship, which starts Thursday at the Convention Center, bridge is much more than a country-club game. When the Spingold, the championship's most prestigious tournament, reaches its final rounds near the end of the event, the players' cards will be broadcast over the Internet and streamed in a makeshift theater.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
When Eduard Junkur started playing bridge in his native Estonia, the game was very much in vogue. The year was 1933. Junkur was 17. But by the time he moved to the United States in 1950, the Estonian bridge scene had gone underground. Estonia had been invaded by the Soviet Union in 1940, occupied by the Nazis from 1941 to 1944, then retaken by the Soviets. Stalin was in. Bridge was out. "Bridge was a no-no in (the Soviet Union) until a few years ago," Junkur said.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Speaking to a room full of bridge players, Walter Mitchell, the president of District 4 of the American Contract Bridge League, boomed: "This is not your grandmother's game anymore, right?" One of the players called back to him, "Yeah, it is. " Mitchell glanced toward the arguing audience member. All of the players he was addressing as they sat poised to start a 21/2-hour session of intent concentration on cards were between 6 and 18. So he revised his point. "It's still your grandmother's game," he said.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Kay, 74, of Penn Valley, who was so good at bridge he earned murderous nicknames and invited comparisons to giants of other games, died Thursday of a pulmonary embolism at his home. So formidable was he at the table that a magazine writer once dubbed him the "Kid-Glove Killer. " Others referred to him as the "Babe Ruth of Bridge. " Officials of the American Contract Bridge League called him "one of the most successful players in the history of the game worldwide. " A good bridge player needs to bring to the table the staying power of a marathon runner, the concentration of a professional golfer standing over a birdie putt, and the long-suffering tolerance of an uncle advising a favored nephew - not to mention a willingness to go for the jugular.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Speaking to a room full of bridge players, Walter Mitchell, the president of District 4 of the American Contract Bridge League, boomed, "This is not your grandmother's game anymore, right?" One of the players called back to him, "Yeah, it is. " Mitchell glanced toward the arguing audience member. All the players he was addressing as they sat poised to start a two-and-a-half-hour session of intent concentration on cards were between six and eighteen years old. So he revised his point.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | By Lisa Greene, Special to The Inquirer
Joseph Livezey 3d lives to play cards. As one of the top duplicate bridge players in the country, he competes in tournaments, teaches at area colleges and hosts 40-person bridge gatherings at his Springfield home. To hear Livezey tell it, bridge players are quiet, friendly folks. So quiet, so absorbed in their game, that four streakers once ran through a Delaware bridge tournament and none of the players noticed. The problem was that Livezey, 34, and his parents, Joseph and Anne (both of whom are also bridge players)
NEWS
May 26, 2013
A reader wonders what percentage of my readers play in duplicate tournaments. My guess is 10 percent. Most readers of newspaper bridge columns are casual players. The U.S. has millions of players, but the membership of the American Contract Bridge League, which oversees tournament play, is 166,000. Nevertheless, duplicate players are prone to study the game's techniques intensely, so my estimate may be low. Social players who try duplicate often fail to understand that their score on each deal matters only in relation to what other pairs did in the same deal.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By Katherine Scobey, Special to The Inquirer
Zelma Schoenfeld Waggoner, 65, of Newtown Square, a longtime library worker and bridge enthusiast, died last Sunday at Haverford Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Havertown. As a child in Lake Placid, N.Y., she participated in local sports, skating and skiing, according to her son, Richard G. Waggoner of Newtown Square. After graduating from Lake Placid High School, she attended Albany College of Pharmacy, then went to work as a laboratory technician for General Electric Co. in Schenectady, N.Y. There, she met George F. Waggoner, an engineer, who she married.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dealt hands were the same in China, South America, Europe and at Lola's Bridge Center in Swarthmore. And with a little luck and a lot of practice, two area bridge aficionados came in 13th worldwide and first among 36,270 competitors in the United States and Canada. They were playing in the eighth annual Epson Worldwide Bridge Contest, held at hundreds of locations in 90 countries on June 4 and 5. Robert Briselli, of Broomall, and his partner Steve Blomstedt, of West Chester, say their interest in math, their study of the game, and their ability to work together helped them earn 1,744 points out of a possible 2,400.
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NEWS
May 26, 2013
A reader wonders what percentage of my readers play in duplicate tournaments. My guess is 10 percent. Most readers of newspaper bridge columns are casual players. The U.S. has millions of players, but the membership of the American Contract Bridge League, which oversees tournament play, is 166,000. Nevertheless, duplicate players are prone to study the game's techniques intensely, so my estimate may be low. Social players who try duplicate often fail to understand that their score on each deal matters only in relation to what other pairs did in the same deal.
NEWS
July 21, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Speaking to a room full of bridge players, Walter Mitchell, the president of District 4 of the American Contract Bridge League, boomed: "This is not your grandmother's game anymore, right?" One of the players called back to him, "Yeah, it is. " Mitchell glanced toward the arguing audience member. All of the players he was addressing as they sat poised to start a 21/2-hour session of intent concentration on cards were between 6 and 18. So he revised his point. "It's still your grandmother's game," he said.
NEWS
July 20, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Speaking to a room full of bridge players, Walter Mitchell, the president of District 4 of the American Contract Bridge League, boomed, "This is not your grandmother's game anymore, right?" One of the players called back to him, "Yeah, it is. " Mitchell glanced toward the arguing audience member. All the players he was addressing as they sat poised to start a two-and-a-half-hour session of intent concentration on cards were between six and eighteen years old. So he revised his point.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It takes serious materials to run a tournament for nearly 4,000 people who are serious about bridge. Along with the plasma screens and card tables, the 25 tons of supplies include 30,000 golf pencils, 19 pounds of rubber bands, and 20,000 decks of cards. For the players who will participate in the American Contract Bridge League's summer North American Bridge Championship, which starts Thursday at the Convention Center, bridge is much more than a country-club game. When the Spingold, the championship's most prestigious tournament, reaches its final rounds near the end of the event, the players' cards will be broadcast over the Internet and streamed in a makeshift theater.
NEWS
October 18, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crews were folding up the bridge tables at the Marriott in Center City and putting away the chairs, after more than two weeks of play ended Saturday at the biggest bridge championship of them all, the World Bridge Series. About 4,000 people played over the course of the series, which occurs every four years and began here Oct. 1 after local officials and bridge players pushed to have the games in Philadelphia. The event, run by the World Bridge Federation, attracted the world's best bridge players from 40 countries - and for no prize money.
NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They live by the compass and speak a language of trumps and tricks, declarers and dummies, bids and contracts. They are contract-bridge players. And though once familiar figures on the American landscape, they are not so common a sight in the post-cocktail age of computers, video games and DVDs. Rarer still are those who can make a living from bridge - people such as Arnie Fisher, who calls Clementon home. Fisher, 64, is a bridge pro - possibly the only one in the Philadelphia area - and to listen to him talk is to feel his passion for a game he describes as the mental equivalent of pumping iron.
NEWS
January 19, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Norman Kay, 74, of Penn Valley, who was so good at bridge he earned murderous nicknames and invited comparisons to giants of other games, died Thursday of a pulmonary embolism at his home. So formidable was he at the table that a magazine writer once dubbed him the "Kid-Glove Killer. " Others referred to him as the "Babe Ruth of Bridge. " Officials of the American Contract Bridge League called him "one of the most successful players in the history of the game worldwide. " A good bridge player needs to bring to the table the staying power of a marathon runner, the concentration of a professional golfer standing over a birdie putt, and the long-suffering tolerance of an uncle advising a favored nephew - not to mention a willingness to go for the jugular.
NEWS
March 1, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Could Norman Kay and his partner beat a pair of computers in playing bridge? No doubt about it. But it will be humans-only as the North American Bridge Championships get underway at the Center City Marriott Hotel today. Some 7,000 bridge buffs from the U.S., Canada and Mexico are expected to participate in the 10-day tournament. There hasn't been a matchup between humans and computers in bridge, as recently occurred here in chess, says Kay, "because bridge-playing computer programs are nowhere near as advanced as those for chess.
NEWS
March 5, 1995 | By Neill A. Borowski, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Margery "Peggy" Solomon wanted to join the women's bridge team at her country club shortly before World War II, she didn't make it because she couldn't play well enough. After a few years of practice and tutoring, she was one of the nation's top-ranked female bridge players. In 1950, with her husband, bridge expert Charles J. Solomon, she won the mixed-team-of-four championship at the national tournament of the American Contract Bridge League for the second time. In 1960, the couple were featured in a newspaper article headlined "The Solomons: Top Married Bridge Team.
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