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American Dental Association

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NEWS
March 9, 1987 | By Jerry W. Byrd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The pearl-white smile of the Hollywood movie star, enhanced for decades by plastic bonded to the teeth, can be made more durable and inexpensive through the use of porcelain laminates, according to the president of the American Dental Association. Dr. Joseph A. Devine, who was in Philadelphia over the weekend for the 1987 Liberty Dental Conference, said laminates can be chemically bonded to slightly crooked or badly stained teeth in only a few hours in a dentist's office. Although hardly cheap - Devine called $500 for a full treatment "a good starting point" - porcelain laminates can be applied for one-half to one- third the cost of enamel-colored plastic bonding that fills gaps or covers stains and silver fillings.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | By Rich Henson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony J. Perri, 73, supervisor of dental services for Philadelphia public and Catholic schools, died Thursday at Hahnemann University Hospital. Dr. Perri graduated from Temple University Dental School in 1938 and opened a practice on Broad Street in South Philadelphia, which he operated until his death. During dental school, he was a student-visiting dentist at the Catholic Home for Destitute Children in Philadelphia and at St. Vincent's Home in Lansdowne. From 1943 to 1946, he was a major in the Army and chief dental surgeon for the Army's military engineering and research facility at Oak Ridge, Tenn.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay S. Seibert, 69, a professor and chairman of periodontology at the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, died Saturday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) at his home in Devon. Dr. Seibert, well known in the dental community, had been a professor and chairman of periodontology at the Penn dental school since 1973. He also was associate dean for academic affairs and director of the graduate periodontology program there. He received the school's Lindback Award for distinguished teaching and the Dental Alumni Society Award of Merit.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | By Eddie Olsen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Friends of Orlando C. Campoli agreed yesterday that the Cherry Hill orthodontist was one of a kind, a character right out of Damon Runyon. "They called him the dentist to the stars because celebrities like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin would come to him when they were in New Jersey," said Stanley J. Zaleski, a longtime friend and Cherry Hill dentist. Dr. Campoli, 66, of Haddonfield, died Thursday at the Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia. He had fought cancer for several years.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Bernice Z. Heron, Special to The Inquirer
The International Dental Health Foundation has appointed Craig Bozzacco of Elkins Park chairman of the newly formed Delaware Valley chapter. Bozzacco is a family dentist who has been practicing in Elkins Park for 14 years. He said the goal of the chapter was "to try to educate the public to the fact that there is an alternate treatment to periodontal surgery, and we will eventually establish a referral service to dentists who have been trained by the foundation to use the treatment.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hugh Francis Robinson, 76, a longtime South Jersey dentist who was a member of Camden Catholic High School's 1942 state championship basketball team, died of complications from cancer last Wednesday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. Dr. Robinson, a Philadelphia native, had lived in Marlton for the last 13 years and previously resided in Pennsauken and Camden. He practiced dentistry in Camden and Pennsauken for more than 37 years before retiring in the late 1980s. Dr. Robinson became one of the first dentists to work in a mobile dental trailer, attending to indigent children in Camden County, in the 1950s and performed dental examinations for schoolchildren into the late 1970s.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph Elwyn Ewing, 81, a prominent dentist, educator and author, died Sunday at West Jersey Hospital-Camden. He was a resident of Westmont. While Dr. Ewing was a professor of fixed partial prosthesis at Temple University from 1934 to 1965, he influenced a number of students. Among them was Earl Stover, now a dentist in Souderton, Pa. "I found him to be exceptionally helpful as a leader. He was inspirational to us and to the others on the staff, to continue our education," Stover said.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Vincent G. Lawlor, 89, of Abington, who had maintained dental practices in Philadelphia and Montgomery County and later taught at Temple University's School of Dentistry, died Wednesday at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook. He had battled cancer for two years. During World War II, Dr. Lawlor served as a lieutenant commander in the Navy on troop transports in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, including the invasions of Normandy and Okinawa. "There were more physicians than dentists on those troop transports and the need for medical procedures was greater than for dental work," said his daughter, Margie V. Lawlor.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Dale F. Roeck, 77, retired dean of Temple University's School of Dentistry, died Tuesday of colon cancer at his home in Ocean City, N.J. Except for two years he spent in the Air Force, Dr. Roeck had been a faculty member at Temple from 1946 until he retired in 1986. He was named dean of the dental school in 1976. Late in his tenure, Dr. Roeck found himself fighting for the very existence of Temple's dental school. In 1985, a time when dental schools nationwide were facing declining enrollment and tightening budgets, a provost recommended that Temple phase out its school.
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BUSINESS
October 22, 2011 | By Bill Toland, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
They say that dental clinics and funeral homes are recession-proof - you can't put off a toothache or a funeral. But dentists are finding out that you indeed can put off a tooth-whitening or your regularly scheduled checkup. About half of Americans lack dental insurance and, according to a recent survey, dental-care premiums increased at a faster rate in 2010 than traditional health-insurance premiums. Lack of coverage, increasing costs, and the lingering effects of the recession mean many are putting off checkups and more urgent procedures.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hugh Francis Robinson, 76, a longtime South Jersey dentist who was a member of Camden Catholic High School's 1942 state championship basketball team, died of complications from cancer last Wednesday at Virtua-West Jersey Hospital Marlton. Dr. Robinson, a Philadelphia native, had lived in Marlton for the last 13 years and previously resided in Pennsauken and Camden. He practiced dentistry in Camden and Pennsauken for more than 37 years before retiring in the late 1980s. Dr. Robinson became one of the first dentists to work in a mobile dental trailer, attending to indigent children in Camden County, in the 1950s and performed dental examinations for schoolchildren into the late 1970s.
NEWS
November 13, 1999 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Dale F. Roeck, 77, retired dean of Temple University's School of Dentistry, died Tuesday of colon cancer at his home in Ocean City, N.J. Except for two years he spent in the Air Force, Dr. Roeck had been a faculty member at Temple from 1946 until he retired in 1986. He was named dean of the dental school in 1976. Late in his tenure, Dr. Roeck found himself fighting for the very existence of Temple's dental school. In 1985, a time when dental schools nationwide were facing declining enrollment and tightening budgets, a provost recommended that Temple phase out its school.
NEWS
August 21, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dr. Vincent G. Lawlor, 89, of Abington, who had maintained dental practices in Philadelphia and Montgomery County and later taught at Temple University's School of Dentistry, died Wednesday at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Meadowbrook. He had battled cancer for two years. During World War II, Dr. Lawlor served as a lieutenant commander in the Navy on troop transports in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, including the invasions of Normandy and Okinawa. "There were more physicians than dentists on those troop transports and the need for medical procedures was greater than for dental work," said his daughter, Margie V. Lawlor.
NEWS
January 6, 1999 | By Dave Barry
I was feeling pretty good when I went to see Stanley. Stanley is my dentist. I chose him because he meets the American Dental Association's single most important criterion for selecting a dental-care professional: He looks exactly like Willie Nelson. If Stanley put on a headband and got on stage at a country-music concert, the audience would absolutely believe he WAS Willie Nelson, except that instead of telling them not to let their babies grow up to be cowboys, he would tell them to floss.
NEWS
December 23, 1997 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jay S. Seibert, 69, a professor and chairman of periodontology at the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, died Saturday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) at his home in Devon. Dr. Seibert, well known in the dental community, had been a professor and chairman of periodontology at the Penn dental school since 1973. He also was associate dean for academic affairs and director of the graduate periodontology program there. He received the school's Lindback Award for distinguished teaching and the Dental Alumni Society Award of Merit.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Despite their anxiety about AIDS, dentists here say they are treating HIV- positive patients with relative confidence, thanks to safety procedures that have become routine and because it's federal law. "We're doing everything we can and there's been no outbreak (of AIDS)," said Richard D'Eustachio, a Cherry Hill dentist and a trustee of the American Dental Association. The comments by D'Eustachio were echoed by several other area dentists, who refused to be quoted by name.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | By Sophia Lezin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joseph Elwyn Ewing, 81, a prominent dentist, educator and author, died Sunday at West Jersey Hospital-Camden. He was a resident of Westmont. While Dr. Ewing was a professor of fixed partial prosthesis at Temple University from 1934 to 1965, he influenced a number of students. Among them was Earl Stover, now a dentist in Souderton, Pa. "I found him to be exceptionally helpful as a leader. He was inspirational to us and to the others on the staff, to continue our education," Stover said.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | By Eddie Olsen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Friends of Orlando C. Campoli agreed yesterday that the Cherry Hill orthodontist was one of a kind, a character right out of Damon Runyon. "They called him the dentist to the stars because celebrities like Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin would come to him when they were in New Jersey," said Stanley J. Zaleski, a longtime friend and Cherry Hill dentist. Dr. Campoli, 66, of Haddonfield, died Thursday at the Presbyterian Medical Center of Philadelphia. He had fought cancer for several years.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Bernice Z. Heron, Special to The Inquirer
The International Dental Health Foundation has appointed Craig Bozzacco of Elkins Park chairman of the newly formed Delaware Valley chapter. Bozzacco is a family dentist who has been practicing in Elkins Park for 14 years. He said the goal of the chapter was "to try to educate the public to the fact that there is an alternate treatment to periodontal surgery, and we will eventually establish a referral service to dentists who have been trained by the foundation to use the treatment.
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