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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2012 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
New York Fashion Week starts Thursday, and it appears the runways will be popping with a fashion flair that's unmistakably all-American. Levi's is planning its first appearance on the runways next week. And J. Crew - a favorite of first lady Michelle Obama - will return to the Lincoln Center tents Tuesday for its second year in a row. American sportswear stars Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg, Max Azria, Lacoste, Tibi, and Anna Sui appear as if they will even be more heavily attended - invitation lists have closed already.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Seventh Avenue spring collections that conclude today should assuage any anxiety that the only items on next spring's agenda will be sarongs and halters drowning in a sea of fringe. While European designers embraced sexy, bare, richly embellished clothes that were meant for perfect bodies and leisurely lifestyles, their American counterparts focused on simpler, calmer, more practical styles. Of course, a bra top or fringed skirt occasionally shimmied down a New York runway, but they were just diversions.
LIVING
November 5, 1997 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Call it reaching for 2000. American designers are presenting an array of the odd sort of experimental clothes that turned edgy European designers such as Helmut Lang into acclaimed industry figures, but left them little known to the general public. Nicole Miller, Patrick Robinson, Yeohlee, Mark Eisen and John Bartlett were on this tip in the opening days of the spring '98 previews here. Unfortunately for most of them, particularly Miller, the reach to redefine a new age of fashion was an old-fashioned flop.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's unanimous. For spring, the dress is best. American designers last week added the final vote of confidence for the reprise of the dress. At the European ready-to-wear collections last month, dresses were as plentiful as daisies in May. The Europeans' versions of the nouveau dresses were flirty, sexy and carefully detailed. By contrast, the American dresses were pure simplicity. New York designers, including Calvin Klein, Gordon Henderson, Bill Blass, Marc Jacobs for Perry Ellis, Carolina Herrera and even mod queen Betsey Johnson, have created minimalist dresses that need no accessories.
LIVING
February 11, 1997 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
The U.S. menswear designers are back to reality. After recent seasons of extravagant shows replete with edgy, forward and hard-to-sell clothes - ragged sweaters, skin-tight vinyl pants, clashing plaid suits and the like - American designers have scaled back the shows and the designs. Stylish basics - leather peacoats, thin V-neck sweaters, tailored gray suits, deluxe overcoats, faux-leather shirts - dominated the fall '97 collections, which ended Friday. "What they are doing," said Kimberly Cihlar, owner of New York-based KCI Communications, a fashion consulting firm, "is what stores and men want: clothes that are wearable.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
OK, women: You've stocked your closet with short skirts, dresses and suits with abbreviated hemlines. Some of you even took your old long skirts to the seamstress and let her update your wardrobe. And now the American designers are declaring long form-fitting skirts, many with slits up to there, as the new look for next fall. On top of that, they are presenting this so-called new look in a retro 1940s way, with jackets - fitted and belted - and hemlines that are nearly ankle-length.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Maybe it was the unrelenting summer heat, or perhaps American designers are acknowledging the varying paths women are taking on their life journeys. Either way, many of the spring 2017 collections presented at this week's New York Fashion Week were filled with nomadic references that made them comfortable, travel-friendly, and, believe it or not, a touch dressier than recent seasons. Designers like Diane von Furstenberg featured tops blousy yet tailored. Tory Burch's printed skirts continue to hover midcalf to midankle in both pencil and A-line silhouettes.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
The mythos of the Wild West endures as a symbol of the American spirit. Now fashion has turned again to that era when good guys supposedly wore white, bad guys wore black and a woman's legs were rarely in view unless she was a saloon girl. Italian and French designers, whose countrymen have been fed a steady diet of spaghetti westerns, take it to the extreme with Thierry Mugler's extravagant Mae West-inspired gowns and heavily jeweled vests, cowboy hats and chaps, and Rifat Ozbek's Indian blanket coats and cavalry-inspired ensembles.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Designers say: Take four steps backward! Once again, fashion's top trendsetters are trying to play Simon Says - only this time they seem determined to turn back the clock. In the fall ready-to-wear collections that concluded Friday, American designers brought back the long skirt, 1940s looks, 1970s looks and a zoo full of animal prints. At least they didn't bring back the unwearable, impractical designs that made last season's previews here a disaster. This year's clothes might be nostalgic and somewhat unsuited for today's lifestyle, but they weren't fantasy pieces.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Supermodels sashaying in September in New York? Designers waging a war of words and fabric? What's going on? In the cloistered ranks of the fashion glitterati, where the movement of a hemline is treated like a declaration of war, the multibillion-dollar industry is gripped by an expensive, egocentric game of who's on first. A dissident band of American designers, led by Calvin Klein and Donna Karan, are storming the gates of fashion, breaking out their latest collections this week, ahead of their European counterparts and even many of their domestic peers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Maybe it was the unrelenting summer heat, or perhaps American designers are acknowledging the varying paths women are taking on their life journeys. Either way, many of the spring 2017 collections presented at this week's New York Fashion Week were filled with nomadic references that made them comfortable, travel-friendly, and, believe it or not, a touch dressier than recent seasons. Designers like Diane von Furstenberg featured tops blousy yet tailored. Tory Burch's printed skirts continue to hover midcalf to midankle in both pencil and A-line silhouettes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
At a Christmas party last weekend, one of my girlfriends' daughters told me that she was on a serious hunt for a pair of well-worn flat boots and taupe pantaloons like those that she-ro Rey wears in the latest Star Wars movie. That was enough for me - a woman who, despite being born in the '70s, hadn't seen any of the beloved franchise's flicks in their entirety - to check out the seventh installment, Star Wars: The Force Awakens . Unlike Star Wars movies past, the wardrobe here is wearable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - The slim-cut, ankle-length trousers and matching midriff-baring tops, the dropped-crotch jogging pants with tuxedo stripes, and the nipped-at-the-waist floral frocks suggest that American designers are done borrowing sepia-toned inspiration from decades past and instead are sending invites to a garden party of the future. This is going to be one pretty soiree. Collections shown at New York Fashion Week promise a dressy and sporty spring 2015. Blue is a top hue, followed closely by corals, peachy nudes, and grassy greens.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
EVEN ON THE NIGHTS when ABC's "Scandal" might be one long eye roll, Kerry Washington's wardrobe commands attention. Because attention's been paid. Washington - who stars as Olivia Pope, Washington, D.C.'s best-dressed crisis manager - told reporters visiting the "Scandal" set last month that she and the show's "phenomenally talented" costume designer, Lyn Paolo, "have been co-conspirators from the very beginning. " At their first meeting, "we got together with tearsheets and pictures we had ripped off the Internet [for ideas]
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
There are two tales to be told in fashion's look book this spring. One is a color-driven story featuring classic skirt suits in daring neons, maxi dresses in popping primaries, and a bold array of rainbow denim. The other starts with the label; we're talking Made-in-America chic. "We have so many people come into our store and ask, 'Is this made in the U.S.A.? Is this made locally?' " said Ali McCloud, owner of the Northern Liberties-based, eco-friendly boutique Arcadia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2012 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
New York Fashion Week starts Thursday, and it appears the runways will be popping with a fashion flair that's unmistakably all-American. Levi's is planning its first appearance on the runways next week. And J. Crew - a favorite of first lady Michelle Obama - will return to the Lincoln Center tents Tuesday for its second year in a row. American sportswear stars Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg, Max Azria, Lacoste, Tibi, and Anna Sui appear as if they will even be more heavily attended - invitation lists have closed already.
NEWS
February 17, 2009 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Some of fashion's heavy hitters - Kimora Lee Simmons, Betsey Johnson, and Marc Jacobs - have scaled back their presentations this week out of respect for the faltering economy. Still, the more than 100 American designers presenting their fall collections in and around the Bryant Park tents are practicing the law of attraction, believing that if they put their all into their work and stay optimistic, the consumer will again buy designer clothing. They just have to. "I haven't changed anything," said Ralph Rucci, the Philadelphia-bred designer who will close New York Fashion Week Friday afternoon.
LIVING
November 5, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Seven weeks ago, Calvin Klein, Donna Karan and a few other revolutionaries broke with tradition and offered spring collections ahead of their European counterparts. The shows were hardly exciting, especially when compared with the recent collections from Milan, London and Paris. This time, there is no middle ground in New York. Collections have been either very, very good or just plain awful. Carolina Herrera, Marc Jacobs, Linda Allard for Ellen Tracy, Ralph Lauren, John Bartlett, Patrick Robinson, and the design team of Mark Badgley and James Mischka are the clear winners since previews began in earnest Monday; they end tomorrow.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Supermodels sashaying in September in New York? Designers waging a war of words and fabric? What's going on? In the cloistered ranks of the fashion glitterati, where the movement of a hemline is treated like a declaration of war, the multibillion-dollar industry is gripped by an expensive, egocentric game of who's on first. A dissident band of American designers, led by Calvin Klein and Donna Karan, are storming the gates of fashion, breaking out their latest collections this week, ahead of their European counterparts and even many of their domestic peers.
LIVING
April 2, 1998 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Titanic, Oscar champ and ruler of box office and billboard charts, is now steaming into fashion. Those lush, sweeping clothes worn by what were surely the most glamorous passengers to ever go down with a ship are all over the runways as the U.S. designer fall previews pick up steam. Designers from Hollywood's Richard Tyler to all-American Ralph Lauren are proposing that women go deluxe, wrap themselves in rich fabrics and swathe their bodies in luxurious coats, dresses and skirts.
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