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American Exceptionalism

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NEWS
October 16, 2008
USA! USA! USA! USA!" The chants have become a staple of Republican rallies, often led by the vice-presidential candidate herself, as if the country were suited up for a global hockey game against - whom? The loud and increasingly threatening cadence of the chant is of a piece with Sarah Palin and John McCain's often-stated belief in "American exceptionalism. " Palin and McCain talk about it often. Barack Obama says he believes in "American exceptionalism" as well. But you don't have to listen long to hear that they are not talking about the same thing.
NEWS
July 11, 1996
CAST ADRIFT ON A FOREIGN-POLICY SEA In foreign policy, conservatives are adrift. They speak vaguely of replacing President Clinton's vacillation with a steady, "adult" foreign policy under Robert Dole. But Clinton has not vacillated that much recently, and Dole was recently reduced to asserting, in what was heralded as a major address, that there really are differences in foreign policy between him and the president, appearances to the contrary notwithstanding. Dole is not at fault.
NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Jonathan Tamari, and Maddie Hanna, STAFF WRITERS
CLEVELAND - Like Donald Trump, the Republican National Convention was anything but conventional. It included sharp divisions, flashy entrances, calls to lock up Hillary Clinton, and internal feuds that went public. Here are the images, messages, and themes that stood out from the four days in Cleveland: America is a troubled and scary place. The nation is in decline economically and morally, according to the speakers at the "Q," Cleveland's basketball arena. Constitutional rights, trampled.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
To everything, there is a season, the Bible's book of Ecclesiastes first told us and songwriter Pete Seeger and rock band The Byrds later sang to us. And if a Republican nominee for president is looking to cast the vice presidential pick in an all-American light, then we must be talking about hunting season. Deer & Deer Hunting magazine has a scoop for its October issue, available on newsstands Tuesday - U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin tells the story of learning to hunt as an 11-year-old and now sharing the sport with his kids.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
TO EVERYTHING, there is a season, the Bible's book of Ecclesiastes first told us and songwriter Pete Seeger and rock band the Byrds later sang to us. And if a Republican nominee for president is looking to cast the vice-presidential pick in an all-American light, then we must be talking about hunting season. Deer & Deer Hunting magazine has a scoop for its October issue, available on newsstands Tuesday: U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan , of Wisconsin, tells the story of learning to hunt as an 11-year-old and now sharing the sport with his kids.
NEWS
January 16, 2013
TO THOSE who insist that we pay unquestioning homage to "American exceptionalism," here's an example to add to your list: Americans pay more, by far, in health care than any of the other richest countries in the world, but live shorter and sicker lives than the people in the world's 16 other richest countries, including Western Europe, Canada, Japan and Australia. Among these countries, American men have the shortest life expectancy. American women's life expectancy is second to last.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | which is working on a revitalization of the SS United States in conjunction with Ch Joe Henwood ?is executive director of Binnacle Reinvestment Group
One hundred years ago this weekend, the world was stunned by the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew who went down with the RMS Titanic. Among the victims from the Philadelphia area were businessman George Widener, owner of the Ritz Carlton, and his son Harry. The Wideners had close personal and business connections with the family of William Francis Gibbs. Such a tragic loss hitting so close to home may have inspired Gibbs, then a 25-year-old naval architect, to begin designing his ultimate super-ship, which would launch 40 years later.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Less than a month after a terrorist massacre of Parisian concertgoers and cafe patrons seemed to target modern civilization itself, the same city hosted a rare triumph of international order. Defying expectations depressed by repeated failures to reach a global climate accord - as well as the daunting complexity of the issue and competing interests involved - nearly 200 nations signed on to an agreement to limit global warming. The countries agreed to reduce climate-changing emissions enough to keep the resulting average global temperature increase under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, about half of which has already taken place.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee When I heard Vice President Biden proclaim to University of Pennsylvania graduates Monday, "China is going to eat our lunch," I wondered if he understood his audience. Onstage with him were Amy Gutmann, Penn's president, and Princeton professor Kwame Appiah, one of Biden's fellow honorary doctorate recipients. Both are leading thinkers on cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism. What did they think of Biden's patriotic call to serve American interests above all other nations'?
NEWS
March 4, 1991 | By GEORGE F. WILL
Unheard amidst the roar of war was a small report from the Census Bureau. It resonates with the largest themes of American history: By 1990 half of all Americans lived in metropolitan areas with populations of one million or more - 39 such areas. We have passed a milestone on a journey from what we once were proud of being to what we never wanted to be. One hundred years ago the superintendent of the 1890 census reported, "The unsettled areas have been so broken by isolated bodies of settlement that there can hardly be said to be a frontier line.
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NEWS
July 23, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Jonathan Tamari, and Maddie Hanna, STAFF WRITERS
CLEVELAND - Like Donald Trump, the Republican National Convention was anything but conventional. It included sharp divisions, flashy entrances, calls to lock up Hillary Clinton, and internal feuds that went public. Here are the images, messages, and themes that stood out from the four days in Cleveland: America is a troubled and scary place. The nation is in decline economically and morally, according to the speakers at the "Q," Cleveland's basketball arena. Constitutional rights, trampled.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Less than a month after a terrorist massacre of Parisian concertgoers and cafe patrons seemed to target modern civilization itself, the same city hosted a rare triumph of international order. Defying expectations depressed by repeated failures to reach a global climate accord - as well as the daunting complexity of the issue and competing interests involved - nearly 200 nations signed on to an agreement to limit global warming. The countries agreed to reduce climate-changing emissions enough to keep the resulting average global temperature increase under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, about half of which has already taken place.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
By Jun-Youb "JY" Lee When I heard Vice President Biden proclaim to University of Pennsylvania graduates Monday, "China is going to eat our lunch," I wondered if he understood his audience. Onstage with him were Amy Gutmann, Penn's president, and Princeton professor Kwame Appiah, one of Biden's fellow honorary doctorate recipients. Both are leading thinkers on cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism. What did they think of Biden's patriotic call to serve American interests above all other nations'?
NEWS
January 16, 2013
TO THOSE who insist that we pay unquestioning homage to "American exceptionalism," here's an example to add to your list: Americans pay more, by far, in health care than any of the other richest countries in the world, but live shorter and sicker lives than the people in the world's 16 other richest countries, including Western Europe, Canada, Japan and Australia. Among these countries, American men have the shortest life expectancy. American women's life expectancy is second to last.
NEWS
August 31, 2012
TO EVERYTHING, there is a season, the Bible's book of Ecclesiastes first told us and songwriter Pete Seeger and rock band the Byrds later sang to us. And if a Republican nominee for president is looking to cast the vice-presidential pick in an all-American light, then we must be talking about hunting season. Deer & Deer Hunting magazine has a scoop for its October issue, available on newsstands Tuesday: U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan , of Wisconsin, tells the story of learning to hunt as an 11-year-old and now sharing the sport with his kids.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
To everything, there is a season, the Bible's book of Ecclesiastes first told us and songwriter Pete Seeger and rock band The Byrds later sang to us. And if a Republican nominee for president is looking to cast the vice presidential pick in an all-American light, then we must be talking about hunting season. Deer & Deer Hunting magazine has a scoop for its October issue, available on newsstands Tuesday - U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin tells the story of learning to hunt as an 11-year-old and now sharing the sport with his kids.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Christopher Moraff
Last week, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal signed the nation's most expansive school voucher program into law. Since the GOP sweep of statehouses in 2010, similar measures have been introduced by the legislatures of more than 30 states — including Pennsylvania, where a bipartisan school voucher bill was defeated in the House in December. Few doubt that there is a crisis in America's public schools. But focusing so much attention on where money is spent — instead of how — oversimplifies a complex problem.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | which is working on a revitalization of the SS United States in conjunction with Ch Joe Henwood ?is executive director of Binnacle Reinvestment Group
One hundred years ago this weekend, the world was stunned by the loss of more than 1,500 passengers and crew who went down with the RMS Titanic. Among the victims from the Philadelphia area were businessman George Widener, owner of the Ritz Carlton, and his son Harry. The Wideners had close personal and business connections with the family of William Francis Gibbs. Such a tragic loss hitting so close to home may have inspired Gibbs, then a 25-year-old naval architect, to begin designing his ultimate super-ship, which would launch 40 years later.
NEWS
September 27, 2011
These are remarks excerpted from the prepared speech, "Real American Exceptionalism," which Gov. Christie is scheduled to give at 9 tonight at the Ronald Reagan library in Simi Valley, Calif. "A lot is being said in this election season about American exceptionalism. Implicit in such statements is that we are different and, yes, better, in the sense that our democracy, our economy and our people have delivered. But for American exceptionalism to truly deliver hope and a sterling example to the rest of the world, it must be demonstrated, not just asserted.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
By Paul Jablow We all recall our chief grade school tormentor and mine was Stanley G. I remember his last name, of course, but won't risk mentioning it here. If only the good die young, Stanley must still be the picture of health, probably setting records in the senior triathlon. I can't say he hurt me that much physically, just some cuffing and shoving. Most of it was teasing, taking my stuff away and making me chase him. But nothing was as traumatic as the day that he announced to me during recess - this was 1948 - "We're not the strongest country in the world anymore.
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