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NEWS
June 12, 2009
Though the American Gaming Association does not take a position on expanded gambling, we would like to respond to the baseless claims made in Monday's editorial "Too big a gamble for Pennsylvania. " Gaming has been legal in Pennsylvania for nearly five years, and, during that time, casinos have not compounded social problems in gaming communities throughout the state. For example, state trooper reports from Monroe Country - home to Mount Airy Casino Resort - document virtually no increase in local crime rates.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Thursday's editorial, "Gaming is a gamble," maligns an industry that has provided tremendous benefits to people - including many of your readers. Casino gaming has brought thousands of good jobs, millions of dollars in tax revenues, and opportunities for local businesses to communities throughout the state. What it hasn't brought are the vast social ills gambling critics like to attribute to casinos. In fact, those who take time to look at the realities would see that casinos have become valuable allies embraced by their communities.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
I was deeply disappointed that The Inquirer chose to make light of last week's terrible incident at Parx Casino ("Slots for tots," Saturday), in which a gambler left a child in a car. Problem gambling must be addressed with thoughtful solutions, not flippancy and sarcasm. The gaming industry has long recognized that some people cannot gamble responsibly. As a result, we have implemented robust responsible-gaming programs at casinos across the country and contributed millions of dollars to fund independent, peer-reviewed research on disordered gambling.
NEWS
January 17, 2011
In the editorial "More gambling, more losers" (Wednesday), The Inquirer once again demonstrated an unfair bias against the gaming industry, as well as blatant disregard for the facts. During the past 30 years, the gaming industry has indeed expanded widely - both within Pennsylvania and across the country. But countless studies confirm the prevalence rate of pathological gambling has remained virtually unchanged during that time, holding steady at about 1 percent of Americans. This is settled science.
NEWS
April 30, 1997 | By Derrick DePledge, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Nearly seven months after a deadline set by Congress, President Clinton made his three choices for a national commission intended to help communities decide whether to expand gambling. The White House announced yesterday that a Nevada gaming regulator, the former state treasurer of New Jersey, and a Native American from Alaska are the final selections to the nine-member panel. Clinton's appointments mean the commission appears evenly divided over the virtues of gambling. Three commissioners have a direct or indirect interest in the industry, three are critical of gambling, and three are considered neutral.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | By Ronald A. Reno
The Republican Party portrays itself as the champion of "family values. " Yet many of its leaders have hopped into bed with the anything-but-family-friendly gambling industry. Numerous Republican officeholders, at both the state and national levels, have become flacks for this $40-billion annual scam that is getting rich off losers, and devastating millions of lives in the process. Louisiana Gov. Mike Foster rode into office in January promising to "cut the head off the [gambling]
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Gambling's impact Re: "Don't bet on gambling windfall," Commentary Page, April 28: While the American Gaming Association does not take a position on debates about gambling expansion, we do respond to inaccuracies about our industry, and there are many in Robert Goodman's commentary. A widely recognized and longtime gambling opponent, Goodman disregards findings of the National Gambling Impact Study Commission that directly contradict his views. Contrary to his blanket statement, results of a commission survey showed that there is no significant correlation between pathological gambling prevalence rates and proximity to casinos.
NEWS
November 7, 2002 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And so it has come to pass, an event long-dreaded in Atlantic City - the election of Ed Rendell as governor of Pennsylvania, a guy whose name means one thing in these parts: legalized gambling next door. But yesterday, Atlantic City had its game face on, with observers downplaying the impact of Rendell's election, as well as that of Robert Ehrlich in Maryland - both pro-gaming governor-elects who favor bringing slot machines to their states' racetracks. "If Pennsylvania got slots at tracks, there would be some effect, but it would be minor," said Larry Klatzkin, a gaming analyst with Jefferies & Co. in New York.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Larry Platt
Is it just me, or does it feel a little, I don't know, gross that, while we're awash in headlines about a "Doomsday Budget" for our public schools, a cadre of well-coiffed businessmen are sharing grandiose plans for yet another Philadelphia casino? How'd we get here? Seems as if, over the last decade, gaming has become a type of crack cocaine for a whole generation of politicians: With their budgets squeezed by economic downturn and an electorate all too willing to vote out of office anyone who considers a tax hike, our so-called leaders - rather than make the hard choices and right-size their governments - have opted for the quick-fix high of casinos, long-term consequences be damned.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey saw the largest declines in gross gaming and tax revenues among the 22 states in which commercial casinos operated in 2012. Philadelphia remained the No. 1 racetrack-gaming market in the country last year, with $835.3 million in gross gaming revenue generated, led by Parx in Bensalem for the third consecutive year. And increasingly, patrons between ages 21 and 35 are frequenting casinos - about 39 percent of those surveyed for the first time - visiting nongambling amenities such as nightclubs and restaurants.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania had one of the nation's largest gaming-revenue increases last year, while New Jersey — marked by Atlantic City's ongoing problems with new competition — reported the biggest decline in revenue, according to an economic-impact study released Wednesday. For the second year in a row, revenue from U.S. commercial casinos increased, rising 3 percent last year to $35.6 billion, to continue the recovery that began in 2010, according to the annual State of the States report by the Washington-based American Gaming Association.
NEWS
January 17, 2011
In the editorial "More gambling, more losers" (Wednesday), The Inquirer once again demonstrated an unfair bias against the gaming industry, as well as blatant disregard for the facts. During the past 30 years, the gaming industry has indeed expanded widely - both within Pennsylvania and across the country. But countless studies confirm the prevalence rate of pathological gambling has remained virtually unchanged during that time, holding steady at about 1 percent of Americans. This is settled science.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
Thursday's editorial, "Gaming is a gamble," maligns an industry that has provided tremendous benefits to people - including many of your readers. Casino gaming has brought thousands of good jobs, millions of dollars in tax revenues, and opportunities for local businesses to communities throughout the state. What it hasn't brought are the vast social ills gambling critics like to attribute to casinos. In fact, those who take time to look at the realities would see that casinos have become valuable allies embraced by their communities.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
I was deeply disappointed that The Inquirer chose to make light of last week's terrible incident at Parx Casino ("Slots for tots," Saturday), in which a gambler left a child in a car. Problem gambling must be addressed with thoughtful solutions, not flippancy and sarcasm. The gaming industry has long recognized that some people cannot gamble responsibly. As a result, we have implemented robust responsible-gaming programs at casinos across the country and contributed millions of dollars to fund independent, peer-reviewed research on disordered gambling.
NEWS
June 12, 2009
Though the American Gaming Association does not take a position on expanded gambling, we would like to respond to the baseless claims made in Monday's editorial "Too big a gamble for Pennsylvania. " Gaming has been legal in Pennsylvania for nearly five years, and, during that time, casinos have not compounded social problems in gaming communities throughout the state. For example, state trooper reports from Monroe Country - home to Mount Airy Casino Resort - document virtually no increase in local crime rates.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
Funding resurgence Your story about the hopelessness and hunger indigenous to North Philadelphia ("Flashes of reality in N. Phila.," Sunday) dovetailed perfectly with the topic of federal aid at the governors' meeting with President-elect Obama in Philadelphia. The nation's urban centers are dead or dying. Philadelphia has, once again, come face to face with fruit born of decades of bad legislation, dysfunctional city government, race-based politics, special-interest influence, and federal-government abandonment, in the form of a $1 billion deficit.
NEWS
August 27, 2007 | By Phil Satre
One problem gambler is one too many. It's a mantra I adopted during more than quarter-century in the commercial casino gaming-entertainment business, and it was often met with skepticism. Frankly, I can't blame those who questioned my sincerity. After all, I represented the "industry. " Fair enough. As Philadelphians and other Pennsylvanians have just experienced, any time casino gaming is discussed, there are a multitude of dueling "experts. " And nothing is more controversial than problem gambling.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2005 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Casino mogul Steve Wynn will unveil his $2.7 billion Wynn Las Vegas, the most expensive casino hotel ever built on the Las Vegas Strip, next month. But even the opening of Vegas' newest playground has not stopped him from checking out the action going on in Pennsylvania - the biggest state to legalize gambling since California. He recently dispatched one of his executives to Philadelphia to scout for slots-parlor sites. "We explore every major opportunity," Wynn said. So does nearly every other big casino boss, horse-track honcho, and riverboat baron in the United States.
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