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American Heart Association

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NEWS
February 17, 1995 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN Di PIAZZA
Fifth graders Amanda Baldt and Christine Harvey double up to "Jump Rope for Heart" for the American Heart Association at William W. Allen Middle School in Moorestown. Jumpers rotated every couple minutes and collected pledges for each minute jumped Wednesday.
SPORTS
June 1, 2000 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Jack Ashburn, grandson of late Phillies player and broadcaster Richie Ashburn, takes some swings as his dad, John Ashburn, looks on at the third annual Richie Ashburn Memorial Home Runs for Heart, a fund-raiser for the American Heart Association. The event, which continues at 9 a.m. today, is expected to draw more than 160 participants to Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Rachel Dunn was born, doctors and her mother, Judy, a labor and delivery nurse, knew something was wrong. Rachel had only half a heart and could not get oxygen into her lungs. She would need a heart transplant. After going to numerous hospitals specializing in heart disease and seeing specialists for six years, Rachel received a new heart on June 12, 1999. Yesterday, the 9-year-old from Haddon Heights joined about 4,000 business and civic leaders and residents at the American Heart Association's 2000 Burlington-Camden County American Heart Walk at Cooper River Park.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
They did some double dutch, skipped like boxers and demonstrated other fancy footwork, giving their sneakers a real workout. The gym was jumping at the Hillcrest Elementary School in Drexel Hill as students from the Harvard Avenue Program participated in Jump Rope for Heart on March 18 to raise money for the American Heart Association. The learning and emotionally disabled youths, ages 5 to 14, raised about $1,600 to help fight heart disease, according to Howard Strohl, physical education director of the Harvard Avenue Program.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
If you think the diet you're supposed to follow to make your heart healthier means having to give up the likes of soft pretzels, Tastykakes, bacon and eggs, steaks, and hoagies, you're right, said Susan Rago, a registered dietitian for the HIP Rutgers Health Plan. But how does black bean soup or tomato-basil bisque sound? And would appetizers such as stuffed, wild mushrooms or Tuscan white bean dip with toasted pita chips whet your appetite for chicken in wine sauce, curried chicken salad, poached salmon with dill sauce or grilled turkey with papaya salsa?
NEWS
October 22, 2014
ISSUE | RACY E-MAIL With robes, change Courtesy of Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has become a laughingstock anew, a comedian's punchline ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). McCaffery, a former Philadelphia police officer, asserts that coarse language and crude jokes were part and parcel of his former job. I do not doubt it, but that type of comportment is something that a Supreme Court justice must shed long before ascending to the bench. |Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair Didn't even peek?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Valentine's Day is still a week away, but here's a show aimed at tugging at collectors' heartstrings (and purse strings): the American Heart Association's annual Heart of Bucks Winter Antique Show, at the George School in Newtown, Bucks County. More than 50 exhibitors representing six Northeastern states have been recruited for the two-day event, set to open at 11 a.m. tomorrow. The merchandise will include period furnishings from the 18th and 19th centuries; country furniture both in its original state and refinished, and glass, silver, estate jewelry and more.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | By Adam L. Cataldo INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Richard Rudow was coming back from his late-afternoon run when, at the age of 39, he suffered a heart attack. "Genetically I inherited not money, but bad genes," Rudow said. "I had none of the traditional warning signs, zero. " After having heart-bypass surgery, Rudow held a party to thank those who had supported him and his family while he was hospitalized. In a spur-of-the-moment decision, he told friends that he was raising money for the American Heart Association, and he collected about $1,100.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John C. McGraw, 66, of Springfield, Delaware County, a former metallurgist at the U.S. Mint, died of complications from heart disease Friday, May 1, at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Mr. McGraw began his career as an engineer at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard before joining the mint in 1974. He worked in engineering and management until 1983, when President Ronald Reagan appointed him chief assayer. As chief assayer, Mr. McGraw tested the metals used for making coins to ensure they met the federal government's standards.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women, racial minorities, and people over 75 are underrepresented in the clinical trials that help determine the way all cardiac patients are treated, a study from Lankenau Medical Center researchers has found. This means that the recommendations that doctors use to treat heart problems may not be the best for all groups, said senior author Peter Kowey, head of Cardiology for Main Line Health. A team at Lankenau Heart Institute and Lankenau Institute for Medical Research laid out the disparities in a research letter published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
October 22, 2014
ISSUE | RACY E-MAIL With robes, change Courtesy of Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has become a laughingstock anew, a comedian's punchline ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). McCaffery, a former Philadelphia police officer, asserts that coarse language and crude jokes were part and parcel of his former job. I do not doubt it, but that type of comportment is something that a Supreme Court justice must shed long before ascending to the bench. |Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair Didn't even peek?
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
High school students in public schools across New Jersey will soon be taught how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use an automated external defibrillator. Acting Gov. Kim Guadagno signed legislation Wednesday that requires school districts and charter schools to include such instruction in their health and physical education curriculum. "I have a 14-year-old son who goes to high school next year," Guadagno said at a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at Burlington Township Middle School.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When Frank ONeill's heart was failing, what saved his life was a heart transplant. But what improved his quality of life and the strength of his peripheral muscles before his transplant was an individually tailored exercise program that he paid for out of pocket - $300 for six sessions - at Lankenau Heart Institute, part of Main Line Health. Now, for the first time, Medicare will cover cardiac rehabilitation programs for patients suffering from "stable, chronic heart failure," according to a February decision memo from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
SPORTS
May 2, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE FORECAST tomorrow calls for sunny skies and a high of 70 in Philadelphia, where Cliff Lee will take the mound against Stephen Strasburg in the first meeting between the Phillies and Washington Nationals in 2014. Rain persisted yesterday, and for the third time in the season's first month, it altered the Phillies' schedule. Last night's scheduled game against the New York Mets will now be played on Monday, June 2 (7:05) at Citizens Bank Park. With days off already scheduled this week on Monday and today, the Phils find themselves playing one game in a 4-day span.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Since the 1960s, the number of people dying from heart disease has fallen steadily in the United States. But heart disease is still responsible for a quarter of all deaths, and remains the leading cause of mortality for both men and women. Innovations in care and more insight into risk factors has helped lessen its damaging impact. One insight is that many people can control their risk. Most heart disease is preventable, but "we don't pay attention to that disease process" until it's too advanced, said Daniel Edmundowicz, medical director of the Temple Heart and Vascular Institute in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 26, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another medical guideline. Another controversy. This time, a group of experts wants to redefine high blood pressure - it's now OK for some of us to be a little higher, they say - and other doctors are resisting the change. Raymond Townsend, a kidney specialist at the University of Pennsylvania who helped write the new guidelines, said the group's work is based on the best available evidence from high-quality clinical trials. Published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Medical guidelines are meant to unify doctors and standardize care for patients around treatments supported by the best available science. But the latest guidelines on the use of statins, a class of drugs used to reduce cholesterol, are already generating significant pushback from doctors. The controversy is likely to confuse patients. The new rules released this week by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology would expand the number of people getting statins to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, or stroke while eliminating specific numeric goals for LDL, or bad cholesterol.
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