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American Heart Association

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NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Daniel J. Hilferty, Kenneth Margulies, and Benjamin S. Abella
Each year, more than 359,000 cases of cardiac arrest - in which the heart suddenly stops working properly - occur across the United States. In Philadelphia, about 1,100 people died from cardiac arrest just last year. Many of those out-of-hospital deaths could have been avoided with a simple solution. Hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique that is useful in many emergencies when someone's heart stops beating, including sudden cardiac arrest or near-drowning.
NEWS
February 17, 1995 | For The Inquirer / ELLEN Di PIAZZA
Fifth graders Amanda Baldt and Christine Harvey double up to "Jump Rope for Heart" for the American Heart Association at William W. Allen Middle School in Moorestown. Jumpers rotated every couple minutes and collected pledges for each minute jumped Wednesday.
NEWS
February 22, 2016
More than 725 attended the American Heart Association's annual Heart Ball on Feb. 6 at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The black-tie event offered an evening of glitz, glamour, and fun for all and included cocktails, silent and live auctions, dinner, and dancing. Awards were given to Philip L. Rinaldi, CEO of Philadelphia Energy Solutions, the 2016 Heart of Philadelphia honoree; and Mariell Jessup, cardiologist with Penn Medicine, the Edward S. Copper, M.D., honoree. But the real highlight of the evening was the $2 million raised to support the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association, with proceeds going to fund research and education to combat heart disease and stroke.
SPORTS
June 1, 2000 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Jack Ashburn, grandson of late Phillies player and broadcaster Richie Ashburn, takes some swings as his dad, John Ashburn, looks on at the third annual Richie Ashburn Memorial Home Runs for Heart, a fund-raiser for the American Heart Association. The event, which continues at 9 a.m. today, is expected to draw more than 160 participants to Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | By Melanie D. Scott, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Rachel Dunn was born, doctors and her mother, Judy, a labor and delivery nurse, knew something was wrong. Rachel had only half a heart and could not get oxygen into her lungs. She would need a heart transplant. After going to numerous hospitals specializing in heart disease and seeing specialists for six years, Rachel received a new heart on June 12, 1999. Yesterday, the 9-year-old from Haddon Heights joined about 4,000 business and civic leaders and residents at the American Heart Association's 2000 Burlington-Camden County American Heart Walk at Cooper River Park.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
They did some double dutch, skipped like boxers and demonstrated other fancy footwork, giving their sneakers a real workout. The gym was jumping at the Hillcrest Elementary School in Drexel Hill as students from the Harvard Avenue Program participated in Jump Rope for Heart on March 18 to raise money for the American Heart Association. The learning and emotionally disabled youths, ages 5 to 14, raised about $1,600 to help fight heart disease, according to Howard Strohl, physical education director of the Harvard Avenue Program.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
If you think the diet you're supposed to follow to make your heart healthier means having to give up the likes of soft pretzels, Tastykakes, bacon and eggs, steaks, and hoagies, you're right, said Susan Rago, a registered dietitian for the HIP Rutgers Health Plan. But how does black bean soup or tomato-basil bisque sound? And would appetizers such as stuffed, wild mushrooms or Tuscan white bean dip with toasted pita chips whet your appetite for chicken in wine sauce, curried chicken salad, poached salmon with dill sauce or grilled turkey with papaya salsa?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Valentine's Day is still a week away, but here's a show aimed at tugging at collectors' heartstrings (and purse strings): the American Heart Association's annual Heart of Bucks Winter Antique Show, at the George School in Newtown, Bucks County. More than 50 exhibitors representing six Northeastern states have been recruited for the two-day event, set to open at 11 a.m. tomorrow. The merchandise will include period furnishings from the 18th and 19th centuries; country furniture both in its original state and refinished, and glass, silver, estate jewelry and more.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Daniel J. Hilferty, Kenneth Margulies, and Benjamin S. Abella
Each year, more than 359,000 cases of cardiac arrest - in which the heart suddenly stops working properly - occur across the United States. In Philadelphia, about 1,100 people died from cardiac arrest just last year. Many of those out-of-hospital deaths could have been avoided with a simple solution. Hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique that is useful in many emergencies when someone's heart stops beating, including sudden cardiac arrest or near-drowning.
NEWS
June 5, 2016
Q. How can I protect myself from a second heart attack? A. After you experience a heart attack, your chance of having another is higher. Most people survive their first heart attack and can return to their normal routine, but they will need to make a few changes. Depending on how badly your heart was damaged and the degree of your heart disease, your doctor will recommend specific medications and lifestyle changes that are right for you. However, it is up to you to follow those recommendations to make a full recovery.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Samantha Quinones bought kale for the first time this week - and ate it raw in a salad mixed with some spinach. Chalk it up to a class on food and nutrition that the 25-year-old single mother of two boys is taking at Congreso de Latinos Unidos in North Philadelphia. Quinones, who lives in the Mayfair section of Northeast Philadelphia, said the class, sponsored by the food-service giant Aramark and the American Heart Association, is making a big difference to her. "I'm more aware of what I buy at the grocery store," Quinones said.
NEWS
March 2, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney's proposed tax on sugary soft drinks is designed to raise money for several ambitious plans, including universal pre-kindergarten. If the tax is approved by City Council (and survives challenges from the soda industry), reduced consumption might mean not just more money for Philadelphia, but fewer health problems, too, in the following areas: Obesity. Sugary drinks are major culprits in the obesity epidemic. Non-diet soda, sweetened ice teas, and sports and energy drinks can have 16 teaspoons or more in just one 20-ounce serving.
NEWS
February 22, 2016
More than 725 attended the American Heart Association's annual Heart Ball on Feb. 6 at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The black-tie event offered an evening of glitz, glamour, and fun for all and included cocktails, silent and live auctions, dinner, and dancing. Awards were given to Philip L. Rinaldi, CEO of Philadelphia Energy Solutions, the 2016 Heart of Philadelphia honoree; and Mariell Jessup, cardiologist with Penn Medicine, the Edward S. Copper, M.D., honoree. But the real highlight of the evening was the $2 million raised to support the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association, with proceeds going to fund research and education to combat heart disease and stroke.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
Q: How can I stay safe while shoveling snow? A: The blizzard of 2016 behind us, take the time to ask yourself, "How can I prepare my body for the next snowstorm?" Whether you see the snow as a workout opportunity or a nuisance, you should follow several general rules to avoid a heart attack. The American Heart Association warns that the risk of a heart attack during snow shoveling may increase for some, and the combination of colder temperatures and physical exertion increases the workload on the heart.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
John C. McGraw, 66, of Springfield, Delaware County, a former metallurgist at the U.S. Mint, died of complications from heart disease Friday, May 1, at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Mr. McGraw began his career as an engineer at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard before joining the mint in 1974. He worked in engineering and management until 1983, when President Ronald Reagan appointed him chief assayer. As chief assayer, Mr. McGraw tested the metals used for making coins to ensure they met the federal government's standards.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women, racial minorities, and people over 75 are underrepresented in the clinical trials that help determine the way all cardiac patients are treated, a study from Lankenau Medical Center researchers has found. This means that the recommendations that doctors use to treat heart problems may not be the best for all groups, said senior author Peter Kowey, head of Cardiology for Main Line Health. A team at Lankenau Heart Institute and Lankenau Institute for Medical Research laid out the disparities in a research letter published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
October 22, 2014
ISSUE | RACY E-MAIL With robes, change Courtesy of Justice Seamus P. McCaffery, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court has become a laughingstock anew, a comedian's punchline ("Swift justice," Oct. 17). McCaffery, a former Philadelphia police officer, asserts that coarse language and crude jokes were part and parcel of his former job. I do not doubt it, but that type of comportment is something that a Supreme Court justice must shed long before ascending to the bench. |Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair Didn't even peek?
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