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American History

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NEWS
May 14, 2006 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What's surprising to Jeffrey Norcross is how long it took for the South Jersey Museum of American History to open in Glassboro. The museum, which houses collections of artifacts from Pre-Columbian (Native American) to South Jersey glassmaking - all sorts of Americana that Norcross began collecting while growing up in Merchantville - opened on May 6 at its new location, 123 E. High St. It took 11 years of planning just to find and open the first place, a building in Berlin Borough where the history museum operated for five years until borough officials in 2001 refused to renew the lease, saying the town needed the building for office space.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Richard M. Ketchum, 89, an author and editor who cofounded Country Journal, a magazine that offered a blend of the bucolic and the practical, particularly to city folk who had opted for the rural life, died Jan. 12 at a retirement home in Shelburne, Vt. Until four years ago, he had lived on his nearly 1,000-acre farm, Saddleback, in Dorset, Vt. Originally called Blair & Ketchum's Country Journal - it was started in 1974 by William S. Blair and Ketchum,...
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I LIKE PLUGGERS. My favorite plugger these days is pint-sized charmer Melissa Shang. Not because she sparred with American Girl, maker of dolls that bankrupt you, and lost. But because she's gonna make a believer out of those who told her no. Melissa is 11 years old, has a super-best friend named Cassidy, carefully observes what the "the cool girls" wear at school, makes fun of her dad's cellphone ineptitude and sings a heart-melting rendition of "Let it Go. " So she's practically indistinguishable from a million other sixth-grade girls in America.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three of the most important individuals in American history. All had the last name Roosevelt, and all were beset by personal demons that threatened to cut them down. Theodore, Franklin Delano, and Eleanor Roosevelt helped define the American century, said Ken Burns, creator and director of PBS's epic 14-hour documentary, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History . Divided into seven two-hour episodes, it will air on consecutive nights beginning Sunday at 8 p.m. on PBS (locally on WHYY-TV12)
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, 88, the influential Democrat who broke racial barriers on Capitol Hill and played key roles in congressional investigations of the Watergate and Iran-Contra scandals, died Monday. Sen. Inouye, in office since January 1963, was currently the longest-serving senator and was president pro tempore of the Senate, third in the line presidential succession. His office said Monday that he died of respiratory complications at a Washington-area hospital.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | By Lillian Weis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a child, Jeffrey Norcross loved history. His mother nurtured that love by taking him to museums and historical sites throughout the state. Soon, their trips took them all over the country. He dreamed of one day having a national-scope museum in South Jersey. So he made it his mission to preserve history from all over the country. He first collected coins and political items, then he began to collect fossils. "It was something I liked to do," said Norcross. "As I got older, I never stopped.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | By Tanya Barrientos, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 25 years ago Ernest N. May opened the doors to the collection of his dreams, the Hillendale Museum. Tucked off Route 52 in the hills of Pennsbury Township, the museum housed the results of May's love for geography and American history. It was not the most-visited museum around, nor was it the most elaborate, but during its 23 years of operation, it was a passion passed from father to son. The museum closed about three years ago, but now it may open once again. This time, however, it will offer education in a different way. Its exhibits may be replaced with desks and blackboards if the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District is successful in its plan to turn the museum into an elementary school.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
Eighty-seven years ago - when black Americans were still terrorized by lynching - black historian Carter G. Woodson had a simple but powerful idea: Designate a week to celebrate the contributions that black Americans had made to their country. Woodson chose the second week of February to commemorate the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Negro History Week, as it was known, was an important development for its time. Back then, official history barely acknowledged the presence of black Americans, while popular culture actively diminished their humanity.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | STAFF AND WIRE REPORT
JEB BUSH says he's going to have to brush up on U.S. history. The former Florida governor has been named the next chairman of Philadelphia's National Constitution Center, a post formerly held by his father, former President George H.W. Bush, and now held by former President Bill Clinton. Bush, 59, says that he's been reading up on U.S. history to prepare for the job. "I want to learn about the past so I can think about the future," he said. He said he feels a cultural shift is brewing in the U.S., and he wants to be prepared for it. "I think there's going to be a time of cultural change in our country," he said, "and typically these have been done in ways that people don't anticipate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I LIKE PLUGGERS. My favorite plugger these days is pint-sized charmer Melissa Shang. Not because she sparred with American Girl, maker of dolls that bankrupt you, and lost. But because she's gonna make a believer out of those who told her no. Melissa is 11 years old, has a super-best friend named Cassidy, carefully observes what the "the cool girls" wear at school, makes fun of her dad's cellphone ineptitude and sings a heart-melting rendition of "Let it Go. " So she's practically indistinguishable from a million other sixth-grade girls in America.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three of the most important individuals in American history. All had the last name Roosevelt, and all were beset by personal demons that threatened to cut them down. Theodore, Franklin Delano, and Eleanor Roosevelt helped define the American century, said Ken Burns, creator and director of PBS's epic 14-hour documentary, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History . Divided into seven two-hour episodes, it will air on consecutive nights beginning Sunday at 8 p.m. on PBS (locally on WHYY-TV12)
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA The annual Black History and Culture Showcase is a weekend gallery for the unsung keepers of the past. They are collectors who display slave shackles from a warehouse museum in Port Richmond or travel to exhibits telling the story of the Colored Hockey League of Canada. And the Easter season showcase is a time to present what they've spent years gathering to an audience primed to know more about black history. Both sides came together Saturday at the Convention Center for the first day of a two-day event that this year is celebrating its 10th anniversary.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY NAVEED AHSAN, Daily News Staff Writer ahsann@phillynews.com, 215-854-5904
IN 1886, Anandibai Joshi became the first Indian woman in the U.S. to earn a medical degree - from the Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania, now the Drexel University College of Medicine. In 1939, Har Dayal, an Indian nationalist revolutionary, died in Philadelphia, where he lived his last years. He had founded the Gadar Party, which sought to overthrow British rule in India through armed revolution. Important documents relating to both Joshi and Dayal might be lost to eternity, if not for the efforts of a 32-year-old North Philadelphia man who runs a digital archive near Chinatown that preserves the history of South Asians living in the U.S. The South Asian American Digital Archive, Samip Mallick said, was born from his desire to maintain his community's past and to prevent its history from becoming eroded.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 2008 election of Barack Obama as the 44th president of the United States symbolized for some Americans an end to the 500-year history of subjugation that has defined the African American experience. It was the last river that African Americans had to cross before achieving true historical liberty. "Yes . . . and no," said Harvard University literary critic and scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr., the writer, executive producer, and narrator of African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross . The magisterial, six-hour documentary traces the history of African Americans since the first slaves landed in the Americas in the 16th century.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
At the start of the year, I brought you the story of two Main Line friends who, while holding down other jobs to pay the bills, had embarked on a bit of a dream: to produce a men's trench coat made in the United States. Since then, Jacob Hurwitz and David Neill have raised $19,108 through a Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign and have sold more than 40 of their $725 American Trench coats, made in Newark, N.J., and marketed primarily at www.americantrench.com . Their handiwork, including socks made at a Reading knitting mill, has garnered kudos from apparel bloggers and online magazines.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
THE LAWLESS rebels that have disrupted governments in Rwanda, Libya and Syria, to name just a few, are not much different from the lawless rebels who have not only disrupted the U.S. government, but may do far worse. In fact, the tea party conservatives that helped shut down the government earlier this month may be more dangerous, because they could cause trauma around the world if the United States is unable to borrow and starts defaulting on its loans; that could happen tomorrow if agreement is not found on a new debt ceiling.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Michael A. Fletcher, Washington Post
Detroit filed the largest municipal bankruptcy in the nation's history Thursday, marking a new low in a long decline that has left the U.S. automaking capital bleeding residents and revenue, while rendering city services a mess. The city, which was the nation's fourth largest in the 1950s with nearly two million inhabitants, has seen its population plummet to 700,000 as residents fled increasing crime and deteriorating basic services, taking their tax dollars with them. As Detroit faced an estimated debt of $19 billion, the state in March appointed an emergency manager vested with extraordinary powers to rewrite contracts and liquidate some of the city's most valuable assets.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Lonnae O'Neal Parker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Philanthropist and media mogul Oprah Winfrey is donating $12 million to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, officials announced Tuesday. Combined with the $1 million she gave in 2007, it is the museum's largest donation. In recognition, Winfrey's name will go on a 350-seat theater. The chairwoman and chief executive of the Oprah Winfrey Network has been a member of the museum's advisory council since 2004. "I am so proud of African American history and its contributions to our nation as a whole," Winfrey said in a statement.
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