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NEWS
March 2, 2016
Another African American History Month has ended, but discussion of the future of the observance that began 90 years ago as Negro History Week should continue. Evidence of that can be found in the personal essays included in the " Black History: What I Wish I Knew " series published through February in The Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com. Collated by staff writer Sofiya Ballin, with accompanying portraits by photographer Michael Bryant, the essays asserted the importance of schools' providing a comprehensive study of black history.
NEWS
May 14, 2006 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
What's surprising to Jeffrey Norcross is how long it took for the South Jersey Museum of American History to open in Glassboro. The museum, which houses collections of artifacts from Pre-Columbian (Native American) to South Jersey glassmaking - all sorts of Americana that Norcross began collecting while growing up in Merchantville - opened on May 6 at its new location, 123 E. High St. It took 11 years of planning just to find and open the first place, a building in Berlin Borough where the history museum operated for five years until borough officials in 2001 refused to renew the lease, saying the town needed the building for office space.
NEWS
July 22, 2015
I FOUND STU BYKOFSKY'S repugnant traducement of the late Howard Zinn and his literary accomplishment, A People's History of The United States , patently offensive and despicable. This polemic rant is an affront to traditional journalistic diplomacy and tact. Mr. Bykofsky's attack is rife with opinionated and subjective reckoning concerning Howard Zinn, his intentions and his works. He also managed to disparage the substantive benevolence of the efforts from members of our City Council, marginalize the convictions of an entire community of intellectuals, insidiously inject politically polarized conflagrations, and make asinine presumptions about contemporary American history and modern American culture.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I LIKE PLUGGERS. My favorite plugger these days is pint-sized charmer Melissa Shang. Not because she sparred with American Girl, maker of dolls that bankrupt you, and lost. But because she's gonna make a believer out of those who told her no. Melissa is 11 years old, has a super-best friend named Cassidy, carefully observes what the "the cool girls" wear at school, makes fun of her dad's cellphone ineptitude and sings a heart-melting rendition of "Let it Go. " So she's practically indistinguishable from a million other sixth-grade girls in America.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are three of the most important individuals in American history. All had the last name Roosevelt, and all were beset by personal demons that threatened to cut them down. Theodore, Franklin Delano, and Eleanor Roosevelt helped define the American century, said Ken Burns, creator and director of PBS's epic 14-hour documentary, The Roosevelts: An Intimate History . Divided into seven two-hour episodes, it will air on consecutive nights beginning Sunday at 8 p.m. on PBS (locally on WHYY-TV12)
NEWS
January 22, 2012
Richard M. Ketchum, 89, an author and editor who cofounded Country Journal, a magazine that offered a blend of the bucolic and the practical, particularly to city folk who had opted for the rural life, died Jan. 12 at a retirement home in Shelburne, Vt. Until four years ago, he had lived on his nearly 1,000-acre farm, Saddleback, in Dorset, Vt. Originally called Blair & Ketchum's Country Journal - it was started in 1974 by William S. Blair and Ketchum,...
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii, 88, the influential Democrat who broke racial barriers on Capitol Hill and played key roles in congressional investigations of the Watergate and Iran-Contra scandals, died Monday. Sen. Inouye, in office since January 1963, was currently the longest-serving senator and was president pro tempore of the Senate, third in the line presidential succession. His office said Monday that he died of respiratory complications at a Washington-area hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
RENNARD EAST was looking for some family history. What he found was American history. For years, East (whose first name is pronounced reh-NARD) had known that his forebears settled in Philadelphia after leaving South Carolina in the 1920s. But he couldn't figure out why they migrated north. Thanks to Kenyatta Berry, one of the sleuths from the PBS series "Genealogy Roadshow," East has learned that the reason for the family's move was, as she put it, "something that changed American history and African-American history.
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Samantha Byles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local historians can jump into the longstanding controversy of whether Betsy Ross stitched the first American flag at a new mini-exhibit at the legend's house. Defenders of Betsy Ross, whose story as the mother of the American flag first splashed into popular consciousness in the 1870s, have been warding off questions about her place in American history for more than a century. Ross's place in history as the mother of the flag grew out of a meeting that she had in late May 1776 with Gen. George Washington and fellow flag committee members Robert Morris and George Ross, her late husband's uncle.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2016
On this year's Juneteenth, the oldest known celebration commemorating the abolition of slavery in the United States, consider one of the nation's first cases involving the violation of its incipient slave-trade laws: the "Ganges Incident. " The USS Ganges, originally built for trade in the West Indies, was purchased in 1798 by the federal government to deter French privateers from ransacking U.S. shipping. It left Philadelphia's port that year, the first warship to sail under the American flag since the Continental Navy's last ship, the Alliance, was decommissioned in 1785.
NEWS
May 11, 2016
By Michelle Nunn The saying goes that those who don't learn history are doomed to repeat it. But I fear that people who aren't familiar with one remarkable chapter in American history will be doomed not to repeat it. And it bears repeating. This chapter launched from right here in Philadelphia in the wake of World War II, when the cargo ship American Traveller left carrying 15,000 boxes of food for families clinging to survival in war-torn Europe. The shipment had been organized by a new humanitarian group called CARE.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
Another African American History Month has ended, but discussion of the future of the observance that began 90 years ago as Negro History Week should continue. Evidence of that can be found in the personal essays included in the " Black History: What I Wish I Knew " series published through February in The Inquirer, Daily News, and Philly.com. Collated by staff writer Sofiya Ballin, with accompanying portraits by photographer Michael Bryant, the essays asserted the importance of schools' providing a comprehensive study of black history.
NEWS
February 13, 2016
ISSUE | BLACK HISTORY Integrate our past Harold Jackson's column was right on target, presenting a method for integrating black history into the general history of this country ("A wider view of black history," Sunday). This then becomes available to children from the time they pick up their first history book. This could also allow us to recognize influential black leaders the same way we recognize any other leaders. It's about time we stop relegating certain peoples to the sidelines of our history.
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Pope Francis on Wednesday proclaimed the sainthood of the Rev. Junipero Serra, a controversial 18th-century Spanish missionary who evangelized among the indigenous people of California. The elaborate ceremony - the first-ever canonization of a saint in the United States - was held at the enormous Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Serra's cause is particularly dear to Francis, the first Latin American to be elected pope, because he says it honors the special place that Latinos have in the history of the Catholic Church in the United States - and in its future.
NEWS
September 11, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Ray Fussell was growing up, Saddlertown's two streets were made of dirt. But for Fussell and others with roots in Haddon Township's historically black hamlet - started by former slave Joshua Saddler in 1842 - Beechwood and Rhoads Avenues were paved with gold. "All of the people up and down the block left their doors unlocked," recalls Fussell, 85, describing Saddlertown's close-knit, extended-family ambience. The gentlemanly retired technician is one of three Saddler descendants living in the tucked-away neighborhood off MacArthur Boulevard.
NEWS
July 22, 2015
I FOUND STU BYKOFSKY'S repugnant traducement of the late Howard Zinn and his literary accomplishment, A People's History of The United States , patently offensive and despicable. This polemic rant is an affront to traditional journalistic diplomacy and tact. Mr. Bykofsky's attack is rife with opinionated and subjective reckoning concerning Howard Zinn, his intentions and his works. He also managed to disparage the substantive benevolence of the efforts from members of our City Council, marginalize the convictions of an entire community of intellectuals, insidiously inject politically polarized conflagrations, and make asinine presumptions about contemporary American history and modern American culture.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
C. Dallett Hemphill, 56, an American history professor at Ursinus College, an accomplished storyteller, and a scholar whose specialty was social history from colonial times to the 19th century, died at Jefferson Hospital on Friday, July 3, after a prolonged battle with breast cancer. Ms. Hemphill's research topics included how the French government provided women for the settlers of Louisiana and the role of women in 18th-century Quaker meetings. She lived in Erdenheim, Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 3, 2015
NOW YOU SEE them, now you don't. Philadelphia has Mystique the Magician and Derek Lee of D&J Entertainment. But not a whole lot of other African-Americans make their living doing magic tricks. "Finding an African-American magician is like finding a needle in a haystack," Ran 'D Shine, 45, of Mount Airy, told me earlier this week. "We are out there, but it's hard to find us. " Come Saturday, it won't be hard at all. Five black magicians will perform at Shine's "Heart and Soul of Magic" show at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, 12th and Market streets.
NEWS
June 10, 2015
THIS WEEK CNN rolls out a documentary on the '70s, following its remembrance of the '60s, a decade regarded as the most revolutionary in American history, aside from the Revolution itself. Wrong. The most revolutionary period in American history is now . The '60s brought a sea of changes to music, movies, fashion and to what had been largely a patriarchal society. (Think "Mad Men. ") It was the beginning of feminism and an attempt to dismantle institutionalized and discriminatory American laws and customs.
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