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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
George Catlin (1796-1872), a native of Wilkes-Barre, was the first American artist to paint realistic scenes of American Indian life. He made nearly 600 such paintings during five extended trips through the Midwest between 1830 and 1836. A group of 50 Catlin paintings from the National Gallery of Art has gone on view at the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington as a companion show to a traveling exhibition of 130 pieces of American Indian art from the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami.
NEWS
May 17, 1989 | By Ruth Masters, Special to The Inquirer
Fashion-conscious New Jerseyans will receive a stylistic boost tailor-made for those looking for inexpensive but unique items of clothing. The Powhatan-Renape Nation will hold its sixth annual fashion show and luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Saturday at the Rankokus Indian Reservation on Rancocas-Mount Holly Road in Westampton. The fashion show, which begins at 1 p.m., will feature styles that draw upon traditional American Indian patterns and designs. The clothing is designed by Ardina Moore, owner of Buckskin to Silk, a small Miami, Okla.
NEWS
May 11, 2016
ISSUE | AMERICAN INDIANS Send remains home Kudos to Inquirer reporter Jeff Gammage for writing about the horrors inflicted on the American Indian children of Carlisle, Pa. ("Honoring ancestors," May 1). I hope the U.S. Army's consultations with Indian tribes will be completed successfully within a reasonable time so that the children's remains can be returned to their families. The wait has been too long. |Bernice Kaplan, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Art glass, American Indian artifacts and industrial-strength gold chains from that increasingly popular consigner, the district attorney's office, will be offered at a variety of sales next week - including two on Monday, Memorial Day. That is when the art glass will be offered at the Arp Auction Co., 156 Fallsington Ave., Tullytown, starting at 10 a.m. Perhaps the most important piece is a Duffner and Kimberly leaded lamp on a Gorham base...
SPORTS
July 14, 1993 | By Ron Reid, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. women's basketball team has scarcely received half the attention focused on the U.S. men at the World University Games. But owing to the ball-hawking presence of Ryneldi Becenti, a 5-foot-7 point guard and an all-American in every sense of the term, the U.S. women are 4-1 and satisfying fans in two nations. One, of course, is the United States. The other is the 200,000-member Navajo nation of northern Arizona, headquartered on the Fort Defiance reservation, where Becenti lived with her American Indian family until she was 18 years old. That's when basketball took Becenti to college and the challenge of a new, big-city culture.
NEWS
December 7, 2003 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sandy Sandy remembers the day, 19 months ago, when she got an e-mail from Kansas signed "Chief Two Bears Standing. " "I see you are being led by the ancestors," he wrote after viewing her cave-art style on the Internet. Sandy, a Tabernacle watercolorist born Sandra Sandy, thanked him for the compliment, but replied that she was not American Indian. The chief - who recently retired from his post with the intertribal Red Nation of the Cherokee - was doubtful and encouraged her to research her genealogy.
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the day of longest light, the pagans would gather on plains, in forests, round bonfires, in sweat lodges, and celebrate the shift of the seasons. Druids at Stonehenge. Witches in Europe. American Indians. The sun would rise and arc across the sky, and early peoples would rejoice that winter was dead at last, that summer had arrived in all its fruitfulness. "They saw this one special time as a kind of fulfillment of the yearly passage and setting up the yearly promise," says University of Pennsylvania folklorist Roger Abrahams.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | DAVID M WARREN / Inquirer Suburban Staff
Wenonah Historical Society officers Jane Ramsay (left) and Lucy Schulz gather, in Ramsay's home, photos and artifacts that will be displayed from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday in the Community Center. American Indian and Wenonah Military Academy items will be included.
NEWS
November 4, 2005
An Oct. 10 article on the Commentary Page asserted that the basis of the term Indian, as in "American Indian," was not related to the word India, which (the article stated) Columbus did not know. In fact, Columbus' passport from Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain sent him "toward the regions of India," and in a letter written during his return trip, Columbus used the word India six times and the word Indians four times to describe the inhabitants of the lands he visited.
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NEWS
May 19, 2016
Return of remains is long overdue The removal of American Indian children from their families beginning in 1879 is a dark and truly evil chapter in our history ("On Indians' land, Army hears plea for remains," May 11). As I read about relatives of the chidren asking for their remains to be returned to their homes, I became heartbroken and outraged. These children lost everything - their families, their culture, their religion, their rightful heritage, and finally their lives at the hands of the ignorant and brutal white authorities at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
Evelyn S. Lieberman, 71, a public-relations specialist in Washington who as deputy chief of staff under President Bill Clinton helped arrange a job transfer for Monica S. Lewinsky after becoming uneasy about the junior staffer's frequent presence around the Oval Office, died Dec. 12 in Washington. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said a friend, Julie Mason. Ms. Lieberman was known in the capital as the consummate public-relations professional, an adviser who assiduously worked to support her powerful bosses, including, at times, defending them from self-inflicted wounds.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Thorpe's sons asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to overturn a ruling that prevents them from moving the great American Indian athlete's remains from the Pennsylvania town that bears his name to the Oklahoma tribal lands where he was born. In a 128-page filing, William Thorpe and Richard Thorpe, as well as the Sac and Fox Nation of Oklahoma, argued that a Philadelphia-based appeals court last year wrongly interpreted a law designed to protect the remains of American Indians.
NEWS
January 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOYCE SAPP was curious about her family background, and discovered that she had some Apache back there. And she joined with a man who had Cherokee in his family background. A lot of African-Americans discover some American Indian ancestry if they care to dig deeply into it. And Joyce did. Her interest in both American Indian and African-American history became a passion, and she enjoyed reading about it and passing her knowledge on to her children and grandchildren. Joyce D. Sapp, who worked for many years in nursing homes, mostly in the suburbs where she found satisfaction in helping senior citizens, died of cancer on Jan. 21. She was 69 and was living in Atlanta, but had lived most of her life in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has released a new report that people won't like for different reasons. At a time when many Americans insist it's time to stop thinking in terms of black and white, or brown or yellow, the Casey report says race still matters. The foundation devised a Race for Results Index, which considered metrics such as the number of babies born at normal weights, eighth graders who scored at or above proficient in math, children in two-parent families, and children in families above 200 percent of the poverty level.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal court in Minnesota has ordered a Montgomery County company that provides check-cashing and other financial services in American Indian casinos to repay $5.62 million plus 10 percent annual interest to a Minnesota tribe. Money Centers of America Inc., of King of Prussia, had a contract under which it received cash advances from Corporate Commission of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe Indians to supply cash to gamblers in two casinos. Money Centers was supposed to repay the advances within a certain number of days, but over three years, starting in 2009, it fell behind.
SPORTS
September 6, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
A LOT OF EAGLES fans are already preparing for Monday's game against the Redskins. An American Indian tribe is preparing too, but in a much different way. The Oneida Indian Nation said yesterday that it will run spots on Washington-area radio stations before the game, imploring the Redskins to change their nickname. The tribe said it finds the name offensive. The ad begins with a reference to the racial slur used by Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper toward a security guard at a concert this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Gary Thompson, DAILY NEWS MOVIE CRITIC
We call it corn, the Native Americans call it maize. Whatever you call it, there's a ton of it the screenplay of Crooked Arrows . It's billed as the first movie about lacrosse, the country's fastest-growing sport and also the continent's oldest, played by the six nations of the Iroquois confederacy going back a thousand years or more - a heritage reflected in the underdog scenario that drives Crooked Arrows. Former Superman Brandon Routh (part Kickapoo, who knew?
NEWS
November 24, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Historians are not certain whether the holiday meal we eat today can be traced back to a harvest feast Pilgrims and Indians shared in 1621, let alone whether turkey was involved. "I find it doubtful," says Drew Isenberg, a Temple historian who specializes in American Indian history. "I wouldn't be surprised if it was an imagined-memory exercise. " Is it possible that the settlers and the natives actually sat down together at Plimoth Plantation? "Yeah," replies Susan Klepp, a professor of colonial history at Temple.
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