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NEWS
July 27, 1987 | BY JERRY O'KEEFE
A good number of jobs for Americans, which used to be around the corner or somewhere nearby in the neighborhood, are moving to Mexico. Our own U.S. Commerce Department (USCD) has helped take them away. How? Well, first picture this. You know how some of local companies participate in "Job Fairs" whereby they do their best to hire local residents? This kind of cooperation is great for everybody involved, especially the local economy and tax base. USCD has its own job fair, but nowhere in the U.S. This government agency has what they call a maquiladora or "twin plant" in Mexico which encourages American companies to move their operations to Mexico.
NEWS
September 19, 1993 | By BILL CLINTON
We face the challenge of our own hemisphere, our own country, our own economic fortunes. (The North American Free Trade Agreement) means jobs. American jobs, and good-paying American jobs. If I didn't believe that, I wouldn't support this agreement (with Mexico and Canada). Fifty years ago at the end of World War II, an unchallenged America was protected by the oceans and by our technological superiority; and, very frankly, by the economic devastation of the people who could otherwise have been our competitors.
NEWS
September 9, 1996 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
ASK A PRESIDENT of the United States how to create good jobs for American workers. He will say: exports. That's what Bill Clinton says, and what every president before him, Republican and Democrat, has said for 30 years and more. "Every time we sell $1 billion of American products and services overseas, we create about 20,000 jobs" at home. That's Clinton in 1993. "Each additional billion dollars in exports creates nearly 20,000 new jobs here in the United States. " That's George Bush, in 1991.
NEWS
September 8, 1996 | By Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
LET'S SUPPOSE, for a moment, that there was a country where the people in charge charted a course that eliminated millions of good jobs. Suppose they gave away several million more jobs to people from other nations. Finally, imagine that the people running this country implemented economic policies that enabled those at the very top to grow ever richer while most others grew poorer. You wouldn't want to live in such a place, would you? Too bad. You already do. These are some of the consequences of failed U.S. government policies that have been building over the last three decades - the same policies that people in Washington today are intent on keeping or expanding.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to imagine a crueler fate for Fred Pirkle, an inventor whose 65-year-old hands have been in creative motion since he was a boy growing up in Texas. "The first time I stood next to a lathe," the Bucks County manufacturing executive recalled, "I was shivering all over. I was excited as I could be. " The first time he got to run a lathe? "I was almost paralyzed with excitement," Pirkle said. Today, the excitement is still there, though a fast-moving form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more familiarly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, has shut down virtually all Pirkle's voluntary muscle movement.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2016 | By Mark Zandi
Economists are gnashing their teeth over much of the back-and-forth about global trade in the presidential campaign. Mostly, the candidates are dissing the potential trade deal between the U.S. and other Pacific-rim nations, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and global trade in general. The candidates either didn't take Economics 101 in college, or they are ignoring what they learned - that global trade is a plus for the economy, and thus for jobs and incomes. Kiboshing trade deals is for the most part bad economics.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ross Perot's Reform Party - with a new vice presidential candidate and a banner-toting cocker spaniel - brought its push-the-bums-out populism to Philadelphia yesterday and opened a campaign headquarters next door to Joe's Pizza on South 16th Street. Perot's running mate, Pat Choate, a frequent guest on the talk-show circuit, said at a news conference that President Clinton, Congress and big business had denied American workers their livelihoods through international trade agreements, greed and an elitism toward the daily concerns of voters.
NEWS
January 24, 1986
To create more American jobs and erase our huge trade deficit, we must buy more American products and fewer imports. Higher tariffs and strict import quotas simply would cause other nations to crack down on the vast overseas operations of American firms. We could beat imports in the open market with high-volume sales by big retail stores that stocked only American-made goods. The more domestic products we buy, the better chance our industries will have to compete with imports made by cheap foreign labor.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | by Allen Questrom
Ever since Ross Perot claimed that the "great sucking sound" we were all supposedly hearing was that of American jobs going south to Mexico, millions of Americans have come to believe that the North American Free Trade Agreement would harm the United States. But if Perot's admittedly formidable ears picked up a sucking sound, it had nothing to do with NAFTA, which has yet to be approved by Congress or put into effect. And if NAFTA is approved, it will not cost us jobs, but it will unleash an enormous tide of benefits.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By David Nakamura, Washington Post
TAMPA, Fla. - President Obama seized on a published news report Friday to launch a new attack on Republican challenger Mitt Romney, accusing the former businessman of outsourcing jobs during his successful run as the head of a private-equity firm. Obama cited a Washington Post story Friday that reported that Bain Capital, the firm cofounded by Romney, had invested in companies that specialized in sending jobs abroad to facilities in low-wage countries such as China and India. The president contrasted the story with his proposals - not yet approved by Congress - to give tax cuts to U.S. firms that bring jobs back from overseas.
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NEWS
September 6, 2016
By Charles Wowkanech If you're someone who believes that unions are not as important as they once were, it's time to reconsider. It's not just a coincidence that the drop in union membership over the last 50 years corresponds directly with a decline in the middle class' share of national income. Whether you are a union member or not, this should be worrisome. Besides stagnant wages for most working people, the trend of rising income inequality reduces educational opportunity, stifles upward mobility, and distorts the power dynamics of our society.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2016 | By Mark Zandi
Economists are gnashing their teeth over much of the back-and-forth about global trade in the presidential campaign. Mostly, the candidates are dissing the potential trade deal between the U.S. and other Pacific-rim nations, known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and global trade in general. The candidates either didn't take Economics 101 in college, or they are ignoring what they learned - that global trade is a plus for the economy, and thus for jobs and incomes. Kiboshing trade deals is for the most part bad economics.
NEWS
April 11, 2016
The perceived vulnerability of Sen. Pat Toomey in the general election, in which the Republican presidential nominee may be more liability than asset, has produced three competitive Democratic candidates to challenge the incumbent. JOE SESTAK , a former Navy admiral who served two terms in the House, has the best credentials and experience to immediately serve Pennsylvania and the nation. His unrelenting intellectual curiosity has helped Sestak, a notoriously hard taskmaster, form a deep understanding of government and foreign policy that Katie McGinty and John Fetterman cannot match.
NEWS
July 23, 2015
ISSUE | ARTS ECONOMY Cultural learning Yes, Philadelphia needs more arts jobs to "enrich the lives of all Philadelphians," as an Inquirer editorial noted ("A need for more arts jobs," July 20). And it isn't much of a stretch that many of the artists enriching our lives will get their start in the city's public schools, and that the audiences who fill the galleries and concert halls begin their love of the arts in grade school. That's why continuing to remove the arts from the School District curriculum certainly won't add to the enrichment of our lives.
NEWS
March 31, 2015
ISSUE | FREE TRADE With each new deal, more jobs leave What a disappointment it was to read former Gov. Ed Rendell's endorsement of yet another expansion of supposed free trade between the United States and Asia ("For the middle class, trade issues are crucial," March 20). Apparently, Rendell belongs to that group of politicians who actually believe the expansion of trade provides a net benefit to the American worker and the U.S. economy, rather than the sad truth that these moves often promote more imports than exports for our country.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | Helen UbiƱas, Daily News Columnist
A LOT of people in this city understand that embracing diversity isn't just about sensitivity. It's about survival. In a conversation I had with Mayor Nutter in May, he said that if Philadelphia wants to thrive, it needs to embrace its changing demographics. That includes an increasing number of new immigrants who are buying homes, opening businesses and in 2010 were a huge part of Philadelphia's first population increase in decades. The city gets it. So why don't the Mummers?
NEWS
December 2, 2012
Scott Paul is executive director of the Alliance for American Manufacturing In the last decade, we've lost more than five million manufacturing jobs to overseas competitors, particularly China. Simultaneously, our trade deficit with that country has grown. The deficit with China for September was $29.1 billion - the second-highest monthly deficit yet recorded. For the whole of 2011, in fact, our trade deficit with China came to a record $295 billion, and we're on track to exceed that number in 2012.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | BY ROB SMITH
A YEAR AGO, if I'd said I was worried about "sequestration," most folks would have figured I needed a doctor and wondered if it was something they could catch. But by now, just about everyone knows it means a trillion dollars in automatic budget cuts that start in January 2013. It's part of the so-called "fiscal cliff" that was put in motion when the congressional "supercommittee" collapsed last fall - a devastating package of tax hikes and spending cuts that experts say will blow up our fragile economic recovery and drag us back into recession next year.
NEWS
August 20, 2012
In "The Betrayal of the American Dream," Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele revisit their 1991 Inquirer series, "America: What Went Wrong," in which they forecast a decline of the middle class. Now, they document how actions going back three decades have left millions of Americans in economic ruin. Today, the authors, in answers to questions posed by The Inquirer, outline their ideas for how the United States can solve its economic problems, the focus of the final chapter of their book.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | Donald L. Barlettand James B. Steele
Question. What would you say is the number-one policy change that would stop the drain of American jobs? Answer. A key goal should be to stop the bleeding of jobs in manufacturing. There has been a lot of talk in recent months about bringing manufacturing back from overseas and a few companies have done so. It would be a defining moment in rebuilding the middle class if a significant reversal could occur, but that seems unlikely. However, we must focus on bolstering and preserving the manufacturing sector that's left so it can survive.
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