CollectionsAmerican Life
IN THE NEWS

American Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Glasnost is coming to Central Bucks East High School. Recently, Roman Grekh, 15, of Lvov, in the Ukraine, arrived in Buckingham Township on a yearlong student-exchange program sponsored by Rotary International and the Warrington Rotary Club. Grekh and 12 other youths from Lvov are in the first group of teenagers from the Soviet Union to participate in the program. Six of them will attend schools in Pennsylvania. Grekh is the only group member who will attend school in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
December 19, 2008 | By Jonathan Last
Last Friday morning, Cardinal Avery Dulles died in New York. Dulles was one of the world's preeminent theologians and intellectuals. As such, his absence will be noticed in the public square. His passing also marks the end of a very particular kind of American life. The Dulles clan was never quite royalty, but it was, in its way, an American version of the British nobility. Three of Avery Dulles' forebears were secretaries of state. His father had an airport named after him, and his uncle was director of the CIA. Born in 1918, Dulles was educated in Switzerland and then at Choate Rosemary Hall before being packed off to Harvard.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
RICHARD and Cynthia Murphy are the picture of suburbia. The couple suspected of espionage on behalf of Mother Russia were captured on camera seated at a table full of American goodies: Bud Light, Coca-Cola, Heinz ketchup, hamburger buns, paper plates and towels on a checkered cloth. Richard Murphy has a cheeseburger in one hand and a Coors Light in the other. His wife is putting the finishing touches on the food in front of her. The picture could've been taken anywhere in the country, especially around Independence Day. So how did two Russians manage to perfect American life all the way down to the details of a typical barbecue?
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | BBC Commentary
WHY ALL THE FUSS ABOUT O'GRADY? Nothing could better illustrate the neurotic inwardness of America today than the extraordinary reaction of the American President, the American media, and perhaps the American people (than the rescue of Capt. Scott O'Grady). Against the backdrop of a terrible war in which a quarter of a million people have already died, the U.S. celebrates the saving of one American life (an incident inflated) into an act of supposedly "American" heroism, to send its warming rays into every American heart.
NEWS
June 29, 1997
I came to the United States from South Vietnam. After the fall of Saigon in 1975, I could not continue to teach in a Roman Catholic elementary school. I worked hard, but with little salary, under communist control. I looked forward to one day living in freedom. In March 1982, the opportunity to come to the United States presented itself. I knew I had to take it in order to live the life I felt called to. When I came to the United States, I expected to be able to speak and act freely, using my God-given gifts and talents.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Carrie Rickey and For the Inquirer
James Earl Jones, thunder-voiced actor of stage and screen, is the recipient of the 2012 Marian Anderson Award, Mayor Nutter announced Monday, citing Jones' "culture-changing" theater roles and his "iconic" work as the voice of Darth Vader in Star Wars. The honor named for Anderson, the Philadelphia-born contralto who lifted her voice in the fight for social justice, will be presented to Jones at a Kimmel Center gala, Nutter said. Previous winners include actors Sidney Poitier, Gregory Peck, Harry Belafonte, and Mia Farrow, and poet Maya Angelou.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Nearly 30 years ago, I made a promise to my boyfriend/almost fiancé. If we got married and he really missed his native India, I would agree to move there. He had come to America for grad school, with every intention of returning home - until he met me. I was his American-born girlfriend whose parents emigrated from India in the 1950s, a girl who didn't care much for her Indian summers every few years, maybe because she always got humongous welts from mosquito bites, always contracted some sickness or other, always was teased mercilessly about her American accent.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Marlene A. Prost, Special to The Inquirer
There was a time in American life - before VCRs, Little League baseball and weekend trips to the shore - when the big event of the summer was the arrival of the Chautauqua show. The traveling Chautauquas rolled through thousands of towns each summer from 1900 to 1930, bringing a potpourri of plays, music, carnival entertainment and lectures to the small towns of America. "It was sort of like the Today show is to us now. People would find out a little bit about a whole lot of things," said Greg Rowe, general manager of the People's Light and Theatre Company, which is bringing a Chautauqua show to Malvern this month and next.
NEWS
June 4, 2013
WE'RE No. 6! That's according to new data from the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, which released results of a survey measuring quality of life in 36 industrialized nations. For the third year in a row, Australia was the big winner, thanks in large part to an economy that managed to avoid the global recession of the last decade. The U.S. hobbled across the finish line in sixth place, behind Sweden, Canada, Norway and Switzerland, which ranked second through fifth, respectively.
NEWS
October 18, 1995 | By Robert Schmuhl
Separatist that he is, Louis Farrakhan is often portrayed as a singular figure whose statements either rally or repulse people who hear him. But the Nation of Islam leader isn't alone. He's a significant participant in the de- centering of America. Increasingly, in various aspects of national life, we are being carried to extremes. Politics is becoming more and more polarized. Movements (of one kind or another) fixate on one issue or cause, disregarding other - and possibly related - matters.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Nearly 30 years ago, I made a promise to my boyfriend/almost fiancé. If we got married and he really missed his native India, I would agree to move there. He had come to America for grad school, with every intention of returning home - until he met me. I was his American-born girlfriend whose parents emigrated from India in the 1950s, a girl who didn't care much for her Indian summers every few years, maybe because she always got humongous welts from mosquito bites, always contracted some sickness or other, always was teased mercilessly about her American accent.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Jenice Armstrong
JOE AND Marcy Cobb are like the folks you see pushing carts through Acme on Saturdays. Joe is a Philly cop; Marcy's a nurse at a local hospital. They are married and have four kids, including a set of fraternal twins. They are a loving, hardworking family with all the usual ups and downs. In other words, they're like a whole lot of middle-class African Americans - except that they're characters in a nationally syndicated cartoon strip called JumpStart that makes its debut in the Daily News on Monday.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2015 | Becky Batcha, Daily News Staff Writer batchab@phillynews.com, 215-854-5757
It's fitting that the Philadelphia Museum of Art should open its new, gorge-your-eyes exhibit on American still life now, as America lays in for Thanksgiving. Ripe abundance and unbridled consumption are two themes in the surprisingly gorgeous feast of American plenty. Posh flowers overspill their vases, mouthwatering fruits overflow their bowls, exotic and domestic animals (including a showstopping house cat) abound. The 175-year retrospective, "Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life," even starts on a peep-show note, with Philly master Raphaelle Peale's "Venus Rising from the Sea - A Deception.
NEWS
March 5, 2015 | BY JOHN M. CRISP, Tribune News Service
    WE INVENT the tools that we use to create the world we live in; in turn, the tools that we surround ourselves with sometimes take on a life of their own, shaping our culture in unanticipated ways. Henry Ford didn't set out to invent drive-in theatres, the suburbs or our irresistible addiction to oil, but once cheap, mass-produced automobiles became available, car culture took on a life of its own. Just as we invented the automobile, the automobile invented us. Thus, I'm reluctant for us to surround ourselves with more and more weapons, especially handguns.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was fire-engine red - can't-be-missed red - and the fabric was nubby. It was what the beautiful Jackie Kennedy wore in the photo I memorized. I had to have that coat, and so did everyone else. So there we were, legions of suburban women decked out in Jackie knock-offs. Some were even brave enough to add a pillbox hat, a la Jackie. I was not. But how I loved that coat! I wore it everywhere I could through two winters. Still, that first grown-up coat of mine was definitely a far cry from the real thing, as evidenced by the way the lining ripped, the buttons fell off, and that nubby fabric that looked so fabulous grew fuzzy and frayed.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
THE CHILD of hardworking Indian immigrants, Anupy Singla owes her many professional successes to her focused, self-motivated approach. But it's a pot of soggy, overcooked broccoli that turned her into a culinary star. In December 2005, Singla was working as a television reporter in Chicago when she pulled a major story - a Southwest Airlines passenger jet skidded off a Midway runway, spilling onto a busy highway and killing a young child in a vehicle. Canvassing the scene for local affiliate CLTV and submitting national segments to CNN, Singla was stuck in the field for hours, leaving her two young daughters at home with their nanny while her husband, Sandeep Gupta, traveled for business.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2014 | BY MATT NESTOR, Daily News Staff Writer nestorm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
OVER 1,000 images were recently digitized into the Philadelphia Library Company's African Americana online collection, serving as a window into black history in Philadelphia and beyond. The African Americana database is the end result of a project that was "20 years in the making," one that will give anyone with an Internet connection access to these cultural relics, said Prints Department Associate Curator Erika Piola. The Philadelphia Library Company has been collecting images since its founding by Benjamin Franklin in 1731, and scholars began collecting photographs, political cartoons and drawings for its African Americana collection in the late 1960s.
NEWS
September 15, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ONCE YOU'RE 103 years old, your memories soften. For Lenora Carey, that means that memories of hardship have receded, overtaken by gratitude that she has known an abundance of the only thing that matters in life. Love. I didn't think this would be the most compelling lesson I'd take from my visit with Carey, whose 103rd birthday will be celebrated Tuesday afternoon at the North City Congress, a senior center on North Broad Street. I met Carey through her dear friend Eilene Frierson, director of North City, who thought I'd enjoy spending time with Carey, who's a living embodiment of the arc of black migration from the South.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
Are you ready for the Big Magillah of American politics? This fall, every important domestic issue could crash into every other: health-care reform, autopilot budget cuts, a government shutdown, even a default on the national debt. If I were betting, I'd wager we will somehow avoid a total meltdown. House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) seems desperate to get around his party's Armageddon Caucus. But after three years of congressional dysfunction brought on by the rise of a radicalized brand of conservatism, it's time to call the core questions: Will our ability to govern ourselves be held perpetually hostage to an ideology that casts government as little more than dead weight in American life?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|