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NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, as hospitals cut costs to survive ever-increasing financial pressures, nurses argued that inadequate staffing harms patients. California's controversial and, so far, unique response was to mandate minimum nurse-to-patient ratios, which, if applied locally, would prevent 222 surgical deaths annually in New Jersey and 264 in Pennsylvania, researchers here calculated in 2010. Now members of that same University of Pennsylvania team say they have figured out a key reason for that.
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Wallace is used to sad stories. An analyst for the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, she reviews the reports that health-care facilities must regularly submit to the state, describing unfortunate events from bedsores to surgeries on the wrong knee. As disturbing as it is to read about these incidents, she said, few have affected her as deeply as the one she came across a little more than a year ago. A mother fell asleep while breast-feeding her newborn. "Sometime later," the hospital reported, "the mother called the nurse, who found the baby blue and unresponsive.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Dorothy Ann Mereness, 80, a former dean of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and an early leader in the field of pyschiatric nursing, died yesterday at Chestnut Hill Hospital after a brief illness. A tall, outspoken woman, Dr. Mereness worked at some of the nation's most- distinguished nursing schools. She also wrote extensively, publishing 45 articles and books, including the widely used textbook Essentials of Psychiatric Nursing. She was an early advocate of using nurses on psychiatric teams.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Citing pressures from managed-care insurers to contain costs, Memorial Hospital of Burlington County laid off all of its licensed practical nurses today to help reduce its budget by $1.5 million. Sue Pitoscia, Memorial's patient care vice president, said eliminating all 17 LPN positions was necessary because of declines in the hospital's reimbursement rates from health insurance companies and declines in the average length of hospital stays. "We'll save about $340,000 a year," with the staff reductions, Pitoscia said.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beneath a banner reading "Humanized - Not Technologized," nurses rallied in Philadelphia yesterday against a plan that would create a new breed of minimally trained hospital technician to perform jobs traditionally done by nursing personnel. Speaker after speaker voiced opposition to the American Medical Association's proposal to launch a new job category called a registered care technologist (RCT) to help ease problems caused by a severe shortage of hospital nurses. Louise Fitzpatrick, dean of nursing at Villanova University, said the medical association's plan would have "dangerous consequences for patient care and patient safety" and was not in "the best interest of doctors, hospitals or nurses.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Ann Trogele Nark, 92, a longtime nurse and a World War II veteran, died Thursday at the New Jersey Veterans Home, Vineland. Before moving to Vineland about five years ago, Mrs. Nark lived in Gloucester City for more than 40 years. She was born in Virginia and raised in Gloucester City. During World War II, Mrs. Nark reached the rank of major in the Army Nursing Corps, helping it create and operate hospital units. Before and after the war, she worked for the Veterans Administration.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As U.S. hospitals struggle with a continuing shortage of nurses, a large-scale study has found a significant increase in deaths after surgery for every patient added to a nurse's workload. Writing in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, the researchers said the chances of dying within 30 days from complications of routine surgery such as knee replacement or gall bladder removal increased 7 percent for every additional case the nurse was responsible for. "Nurses are the front line of surveillance and early detection of potentially life-threatening problems," said Linda Aiken, lead author and director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Two area hospitals will be turning to computer technology to improve working conditions for nurses as part of a plan to reverse a statewide nursing shortage. Memorial Hospital of Burlington County and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center were among 23 hospitals selected from the 71 in the state that submitted proposals for the Nursing Incentive Reimbursement Awards Program sponsored by the New Jersey Department of Health. Both hospitals received the awards for innovative plans for bedside computer systems.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
With health care high on the American agenda, Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter devoted yesterday to courting nurses and touting their support of him over Democrat Lynn Yeakel in Pennsylvania's Senate race. Specter received the endorsement of the Pennsylvania League of Nursing during a meeting with about two dozen health-care professionals at Magee- Womens Hospital, the largest maternity center in Western Pennsylvania. Yeakel was ill yesterday and canceled a day of campaign appearances, including a tour through the Lehigh Valley with U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.)
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 8 a.m., just hours after she returned home from her high school prom, Suzanne Kenyon arrived at Phoenixville Hospital, shifted gears and was ready to resume work on her career plans. Although tired from the night's festivities, she decided to "Follow a Nurse" for several hours - part of a hospital-sponsored career seminar May 7 designed to interest students in nursing. But Kenyon, 17, didn't need much convincing. She has wanted to be a nurse all her life. "My family has been in and out of hospitals (as patients)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 17, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Wallace is used to sad stories. An analyst for the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, she reviews the reports that health-care facilities must regularly submit to the state, describing unfortunate events from bedsores to surgeries on the wrong knee. As disturbing as it is to read about these incidents, she said, few have affected her as deeply as the one she came across a little more than a year ago. A mother fell asleep while breast-feeding her newborn. "Sometime later," the hospital reported, "the mother called the nurse, who found the baby blue and unresponsive.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, as hospitals cut costs to survive ever-increasing financial pressures, nurses argued that inadequate staffing harms patients. California's controversial and, so far, unique response was to mandate minimum nurse-to-patient ratios, which, if applied locally, would prevent 222 surgical deaths annually in New Jersey and 264 in Pennsylvania, researchers here calculated in 2010. Now members of that same University of Pennsylvania team say they have figured out a key reason for that.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010 | By Howard Gensler
OVER THE PAST few months, Arabs, Jews, Italians, Peruvians, Palins and others have all felt aggrieved by the way they've been treated on television. Our latest group to be offended is . . . nurses. A November weight-loss segment on "The Dr. Oz Show" featured six women wearing high heels, retro nurses' caps and white dresses with red lingerie peeking out. The women danced briefly with series host Mehmet Oz and the audience. Sandy Summers , executive director of the nonprofit group The Truth About Nursing, called the segment demoralizing and demeaning to nurses.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Marian Uhlman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As U.S. hospitals struggle with a continuing shortage of nurses, a large-scale study has found a significant increase in deaths after surgery for every patient added to a nurse's workload. Writing in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, the researchers said the chances of dying within 30 days from complications of routine surgery such as knee replacement or gall bladder removal increased 7 percent for every additional case the nurse was responsible for. "Nurses are the front line of surveillance and early detection of potentially life-threatening problems," said Linda Aiken, lead author and director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mary Ann Trogele Nark, 92, a longtime nurse and a World War II veteran, died Thursday at the New Jersey Veterans Home, Vineland. Before moving to Vineland about five years ago, Mrs. Nark lived in Gloucester City for more than 40 years. She was born in Virginia and raised in Gloucester City. During World War II, Mrs. Nark reached the rank of major in the Army Nursing Corps, helping it create and operate hospital units. Before and after the war, she worked for the Veterans Administration.
NEWS
December 20, 1997
When it comes to reassuring patients at bedside, who wouldn't prefer a nurse to a hospital manager? It just figures the people who know how to fit the bed with hospital corners are going to offer more comfort than those whose jobs tempt them to cut corners. That's not to deny that health-care management is a difficult juggling act even for the best-intentioned: controlling costs, meeting fierce competition, and coping with the quirks of government programs. But face it, some of the biggest hospital players are pursuing strategies that repeatedly raise questions about quality of care - from mega-mergers, to mass layoffs like those in the Allegheny Health system, to the "downskilling" of staff working the surgical wards.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Citing pressures from managed-care insurers to contain costs, Memorial Hospital of Burlington County laid off all of its licensed practical nurses today to help reduce its budget by $1.5 million. Sue Pitoscia, Memorial's patient care vice president, said eliminating all 17 LPN positions was necessary because of declines in the hospital's reimbursement rates from health insurance companies and declines in the average length of hospital stays. "We'll save about $340,000 a year," with the staff reductions, Pitoscia said.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
With health care high on the American agenda, Republican U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter devoted yesterday to courting nurses and touting their support of him over Democrat Lynn Yeakel in Pennsylvania's Senate race. Specter received the endorsement of the Pennsylvania League of Nursing during a meeting with about two dozen health-care professionals at Magee- Womens Hospital, the largest maternity center in Western Pennsylvania. Yeakel was ill yesterday and canceled a day of campaign appearances, including a tour through the Lehigh Valley with U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.)
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Dorothy Ann Mereness, 80, a former dean of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and an early leader in the field of pyschiatric nursing, died yesterday at Chestnut Hill Hospital after a brief illness. A tall, outspoken woman, Dr. Mereness worked at some of the nation's most- distinguished nursing schools. She also wrote extensively, publishing 45 articles and books, including the widely used textbook Essentials of Psychiatric Nursing. She was an early advocate of using nurses on psychiatric teams.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | By Barbara E. Sorid, Special to The Inquirer
Two area hospitals will be turning to computer technology to improve working conditions for nurses as part of a plan to reverse a statewide nursing shortage. Memorial Hospital of Burlington County and Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center were among 23 hospitals selected from the 71 in the state that submitted proposals for the Nursing Incentive Reimbursement Awards Program sponsored by the New Jersey Department of Health. Both hospitals received the awards for innovative plans for bedside computer systems.
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