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NEWS
November 2, 1994
The content of Cynthia Burton's "Ad Watch" (Oct. 19) and your Guest Opinion by Suleiman S. Bey Al Sharif (Oct. 20) seem to be pure idiocy in full cretinistic bloom. They state, in essence, that Lt. Gov. Mark Singel is not responsible for the future actions of a murderer for whom he recommended a pardon. Why not? Why should any murderer be pardoned? The man's past fully indicated his future potential. Now, Reginald McFadden, our liberal-driven "second chance baby," has raped and killed again.
NEWS
May 22, 1989 | By JEFF GREENFIELD
"I envy those students in Tiananmen Square," a veteran of domestic political wars said the other night. "Why?" I said. "They want to be us. They want to think and speak and write without being afraid. " "But look at how big their dreams must be," she said. I think my friend was right. At the least, she was describing vividly the missing link in current American politics. I have never had much patience with political or cultural romantics. When a writer comes back from a totalitarian state and swoons over the passion he finds in the writings and paintings of oppressed artists, I find myself wanting to ask him whether he thinks his own work would benefit from a few months in the gulag.
NEWS
November 6, 1993 | By RICHARD COHEN
Sometimes you have to wonder if politicians ever watch parodies of themselves on television - Saturday Night Live sketches, for instance. There they were Tuesday night, the losers trying real hard to be gracious and promising to work with the winner (yeah, like Serbia with Bosnia), and the winner pronouncing the start of yet another revolution. Government was once again being returned to the people and bureaucrats, special interests and liberals had been vanquished. Why does every election night seem to be a rerun of the last?
NEWS
March 1, 1997 | By William Bradley
Liberal thinking has seldom seemed less relevant to the current moment. Seldom has it been more necessary. But with the need to press the reset button on American politics all too evident, liberalism finds itself moribund, befuddled by new challenges, dominated by backward and inward-looking groups. What is needed is not a liberalism that merely responds in dusty fashion, which is to say, the reactionary left. And not a liberalism that merely acquiesces as it looks to personal advancement by being a Clinton caboose.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | By Matthew Miller
When President Clinton and congressmen from both parties went to Kansas City last week to start a yearlong series of public forums on revamping Social Security, they defied two seemingly iron laws of American politics. The first holds that Social Security, which will send $380 billion in checks this year to 44 million Americans, is politics' "third rail" - as in, touch it and you die. The second is that democracies weren't built to tackle long-term problems until they reach crisis - a point that's still a good decade away for Social Security.
NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Standing on North Broad Street on Friday as Donald Trump assured a private meeting of African American voters that he isn't a racist while angry protesters outside insisted otherwise, I wondered what would be made of all that just a few blocks away. These are heady days for the American Political Science Association, trying to make sense of Trump's populism. And more than 6,000 APSA members were just down Broad, gathered at the Convention Center. Jennifer Hochschild, a Harvard University professor and the APSA president, studies race, ethnicity, and immigration as it intersects with American politics.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Daniel Pipes
By Daniel Pipes Of his many outrageous campaign statements, perhaps Donald J. Trump's most important ones concern his hoped-for role as president of the United States. When told that uniformed personnel would disobey his unlawful order as president to torture prisoners and kill civilians, Trump menacingly replied, "They won't refuse. They're not going to refuse, believe me. " Responding to criticism by the speaker of the House, Trump spoke like a Mafia don: "Paul Ryan, I don't know him well, but I'm sure I'm going to get along great with him. And if I don't?
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Michael Berkman and Christopher Beem
With Hillary Clinton accepting the Democratic nomination in Philadelphia this week, we might expect that Americans, and especially women, are taking pride in her historic achievement as the first woman to lead a major party ticket. That is certainly what happened in 2008 when Americans of all stripes expressed pride that the nation had nominated its first African American candidate. Even if they did not support Barack Obama, many Americans recognized the historic nature of the election.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
AUSTIN, Texas - Republican mega-donor Bob Perry never cared for the spotlight. But writing big checks and financing one of the most famous television ads ever in a presidential campaign made the Texas millionaire famous nonetheless. Perry, a wealthy Houston homebuilder who became a force in a new era of lavish spending in American politics, died Saturday at 80. Perry spent $4.4 million financing the famous 2004 Swift Boat Veterans campaign against Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry, which remains among the most famous political television ads in history.
NEWS
February 18, 1987
In his Jan. 29 Op-ed Page article marking the 250th birthday of Thomas Paine, David R. Boldt wrote that Paine "continued writing after the fight for independence, but his involvement in American politics waned. " His influence on American politics, however, continued undiminished. His Rights of Man, originally published in England in 1791, was quickly reprinted in America, where it was widely distributed by the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican societies. For many years, moreover, mechanics, artisans and laborers joined in mobilizing support for Paine's plan (set forth in Rights of Man)
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NEWS
September 6, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Standing on North Broad Street on Friday as Donald Trump assured a private meeting of African American voters that he isn't a racist while angry protesters outside insisted otherwise, I wondered what would be made of all that just a few blocks away. These are heady days for the American Political Science Association, trying to make sense of Trump's populism. And more than 6,000 APSA members were just down Broad, gathered at the Convention Center. Jennifer Hochschild, a Harvard University professor and the APSA president, studies race, ethnicity, and immigration as it intersects with American politics.
NEWS
July 30, 2016 | By Michael Berkman and Christopher Beem
With Hillary Clinton accepting the Democratic nomination in Philadelphia this week, we might expect that Americans, and especially women, are taking pride in her historic achievement as the first woman to lead a major party ticket. That is certainly what happened in 2008 when Americans of all stripes expressed pride that the nation had nominated its first African American candidate. Even if they did not support Barack Obama, many Americans recognized the historic nature of the election.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
THE MASSACRE at Paris' Bataclan concert hall last year was the work of Islamic terrorists, as was the attack on Pulse. More people were murdered at Bataclan - 89, yet the Orlando massacre where 49 died somehow seems worse. The people dancing and drinking in Pulse were hated not just for where they lived - in the liberal West - but for what and who they were. This one was different from the tragedies at Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech, Columbine. Omar Mateen drove two hours to murder gay people.
NEWS
May 15, 2016
John Quincy Adams Militant Spirit By James Traub Basic Books. 640 pp. $35 Reviewed by Paul Jablow To read this biography of our sixth president is to see both how little and how much has changed in American politics in the last two centuries. John Quincy Adams, son of our second president, John Adams, spent a miserable and largely unsuccessful four years in the White House from 1825 to 1829. Like Jimmy Carter, he is generally acknowledged to have made his greatest contributions after leaving office.
NEWS
May 5, 2016
By Craig Snyder A movement arises within and surrounding a major American political party, a movement that rejects and condemns the official and unofficial establishment of that party's leadership. The party "establishment" is vilified as corrupt and corrupting. National leaders in the party, at both the presidential and congressional level, have to fear first, maybe even mostly, their primary elections. They can afford less and less to position themselves for the broad American political center because they must survive ideological purity contests in primaries within their party.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Daniel Pipes
By Daniel Pipes Of his many outrageous campaign statements, perhaps Donald J. Trump's most important ones concern his hoped-for role as president of the United States. When told that uniformed personnel would disobey his unlawful order as president to torture prisoners and kill civilians, Trump menacingly replied, "They won't refuse. They're not going to refuse, believe me. " Responding to criticism by the speaker of the House, Trump spoke like a Mafia don: "Paul Ryan, I don't know him well, but I'm sure I'm going to get along great with him. And if I don't?
NEWS
February 29, 2016
Ahead of this week's Super Tuesday primaries, Currents political analysts T.J. Rooney and Alan Novak talk about the short-term effect labels are having in the election and the long-term punch for American politics. T.J. Rooney is a former chairman of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party Alan Novak is a former chairman of the Republican Party of Pennsylvania R ooney: Candidates hang labels on their opposition either to prove a point or drive a narrative. In most instances, they use them to define their opposition.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - When the smoke cleared from congressional primary season, women had taken one step forward in New Jersey, and one back in Pennsylvania. The result: Come January, two states with a combined 34 seats in the Senate and House will likely include just one or, at most, two women. "It's pathetic," Julie Roginsky, a New Jersey Democratic consultant, said of her party's failure to elect a Garden State woman to Congress since 1976. That drought is likely to end in November, thanks to the results of Tuesday's primaries.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
AUSTIN, Texas - Republican mega-donor Bob Perry never cared for the spotlight. But writing big checks and financing one of the most famous television ads ever in a presidential campaign made the Texas millionaire famous nonetheless. Perry, a wealthy Houston homebuilder who became a force in a new era of lavish spending in American politics, died Saturday at 80. Perry spent $4.4 million financing the famous 2004 Swift Boat Veterans campaign against Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry, which remains among the most famous political television ads in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
The election's over and you're bummed. You just learned the hottie you were interested in voted for the wrong person. How do you deal? Consider logging on to bluestatedate.com or redstatedate.com, two new websites designed to help people find their perfect liberal or conservative love. Or, as the sites put it, "Find your running mate. " Alex Fondrier, 27, came up with the idea while at Boston University. Fondrier, a self-proclaimed political junkie, found that talking politics in the early days of a relationship was verboten.
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