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American Psychiatric Association

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NEWS
January 4, 2013
A commentary Tuesday misidentified the organization that classifies transvestism as a disorder. It is the American Psychiatric Association.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mark M. Rosenberg, 47, a physician who went on to study psychiatry despite suffering from multiple sclerosis and had earlier been honored for his bravery during the Vietnam War, died yesterday at the Central Park Lodge nursing home. He lived in Lower Gwynedd Township. Dr. Rosenberg started his career in medicine practicing obstetrics and gynecology from offices in Jenkintown, the Northeast and at Broad Street and Olney Avenue. It was after about seven years of practice, when he became ill, that Dr. Rosenberg went on to take a second residency, this time in psychiatry.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By Andy Rooney
The seasons of the year are only what we think of them as being, for a short time. Winter doesn't officially begin until Dec. 22 but we all know fall was over several weeks ago. This is one of those interim periods between seasons that's really no season at all but people are talking as if it were winter. The American Psychiatric Association says that about 450,000 people will be afflicted this winter with what they call SADS, an acronym for "seasonal affective disorder syndrome.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vincent P. Mahoney, 77, whose career in psychiatry and psychoanalysis in South Jersey spanned 40 years, died Monday at the Leader Nursing and Convalescent Center in Cherry Hill. He lived in Haddonfield. A friend and colleague, Edward Zehler, said Dr. Mahoney's "high level of energy, common sense and enthusiasm . . . has resulted in the progress of mental health and psychiatry in South Jersey over the past four decades. " After his medical training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Dr. Mahoney was an Army medical officer in North Africa and Italy, leaving the service with the rank of colonel.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | By Bonnie Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Edward Yaskin, 80, a neurologist and doctor of psychiatry, and former longtime psychiatric director of the Camden County Psychiatric Hospital, died yesterday at his home in Haddonfield. Dr. Yaskin was appointed to the Camden County Psychiatric Hospital in 1941. He served there for longer than any other physician in the hospital's history. His proudest accomplishments as director of the hospital were the accreditation of the hospital and the establishment of its Day Treatment Center.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld New Jersey's ban on so-called gay conversion therapy for children, finding that the law, signed by Gov. Christie last year, does not violate the free speech or religious rights of counselors. In its opinion, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia upheld a federal court ruling, citing the state's "substantial interest in protecting its citizens from harmful or ineffective professional practices. " The law bans licensed counselors from using "sexual orientation change efforts" with clients under 18. The federal court disagreed with the lower court's finding that the law didn't affect speech, only conduct.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The West Chester Area School Board, which is holding a series of hearings on teacher Remo Ciccone's professional competence, will seek to put Ciccone's mental health on trial, participants on both sides of the case have said. In an interview Tuesday, attorney Ross Unruh, who is presenting the administration's case against Ciccone to the nine-member school board, said he intended to call several witnesses - including psychiatrists Leo Freeman and Paul Fink - to support the district's contention that Ciccone is "mentally deranged" and subject to termination under the Pennsylvania School Code.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Susan Perloff
If life grew too stressful, if our nerves crumbled, if we couldn't cope, the solution was often a drive to West Philadelphia to the sanctuary of a private hospital, surrounded by gardens overflowing with sympathy where we could spend a month talking about our misfortunes. Until now. The imminent demise of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital marks the end of a monument, the place where Benjamin Rush founded the American Psychiatric Association. Although I was never a patient, it is hard for me to accept its passing.
NEWS
June 3, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Depression, says psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Elio Frattaroli, can be a good thing. So can anxiety, and even psychosis. Like physical pain, these symptoms are signs that something is amiss inside. But, if approached correctly, they also present an opportunity for emotional growth. Making people better is not just about making that pain go away with a pill, says Frattaroli, who is in private practice in Bala Cynwyd. It's about facing inner conflicts that caused emotional pain and talking about them in a way largely out of fashion in modern psychiatry.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A federal appeals court on Thursday upheld New Jersey's ban on so-called gay conversion therapy for children, finding that the law, signed by Gov. Christie last year, does not violate the free speech or religious rights of counselors. In its opinion, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia upheld a federal court ruling, citing the state's "substantial interest in protecting its citizens from harmful or ineffective professional practices. " The law bans licensed counselors from using "sexual orientation change efforts" with clients under 18. The federal court disagreed with the lower court's finding that the law didn't affect speech, only conduct.
NEWS
April 5, 2013
By Robert Maranto Though I'm a Republican, on same-sex marriage I am far steadier than and well to the left of Bill Clinton and President Obama. Unlike Bill Clinton, I wasn't against same-sex marriage before I was for it. Unlike Barack Obama, I wasn't for same-sex marriage (when running in a liberal legislative district) before being against it (when running for president) before being for it (after the polls and Vice President Biden switched sides). Rather than following the mob, I started supporting same-sex marriage as soon as I heard about homosexuals because individual freedom is important, and there didn't seem to be a compelling reason for government to forbid it. Back around 1968, my dad and I were watching our favorite show, Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In , which in the custom of the day made fun of gays, leading me as a curious 10-year-old to ask, "Dad, what's a homosexual?"
NEWS
January 4, 2013
A commentary Tuesday misidentified the organization that classifies transvestism as a disorder. It is the American Psychiatric Association.
NEWS
June 3, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Depression, says psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Elio Frattaroli, can be a good thing. So can anxiety, and even psychosis. Like physical pain, these symptoms are signs that something is amiss inside. But, if approached correctly, they also present an opportunity for emotional growth. Making people better is not just about making that pain go away with a pill, says Frattaroli, who is in private practice in Bala Cynwyd. It's about facing inner conflicts that caused emotional pain and talking about them in a way largely out of fashion in modern psychiatry.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Webster's New World Dictionary dispatches the word evil in 11 lines. But inspired by Sept. 11, psychiatrists have devoted thousands of words to the topic at their annual meeting in Philadelphia this week. They've explored what evil is, what kind of people do evil things, and what can be done to prevent evil. Defining evil, especially in a legal way, is not as easy as you might think. There's so much variation in what constitutes depraved or vile or heinous behavior that it's not far from the famous definition of pornography.
NEWS
May 13, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thousands of psychiatrists and other experts on the brain and behavior will descend on Center City over the next two weeks for three professional meetings that illustrate the breadth of modern psychiatry. The groups will discuss everything from intensive talk therapy to the chemistry and structure of the brain to the interaction of biology and experience. Philadelphia will play host this week to the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Society of Biological Psychiatry and, starting on the weekend, the American Psychiatric Association, holding the world's largest psychiatric meeting.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Susan Perloff
If life grew too stressful, if our nerves crumbled, if we couldn't cope, the solution was often a drive to West Philadelphia to the sanctuary of a private hospital, surrounded by gardens overflowing with sympathy where we could spend a month talking about our misfortunes. Until now. The imminent demise of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital marks the end of a monument, the place where Benjamin Rush founded the American Psychiatric Association. Although I was never a patient, it is hard for me to accept its passing.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia is about to lose a part of its history. Next month, the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital - known as the birthplace of American psychiatry - will be sold, largely a victim of managed care. Its sprawling facility at 49th and Market streets in West Philadelphia is being turned over to a firm that will continue to treat the mentally and offer other services as well. And the new owner, CoreCare Systems, plans a change that will be seen even from the street: Some of the land along Market Street will be sold for commercial use. The institute, part of Pennsylvania Hospital, was one of the country's first psychiatric institutions.
LIVING
July 8, 1996 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
How many times have you awakened in the mornings and asked yourself: "What on earth was that all about?" Were you chased down a dark alley last night, and then your assailant suddenly became the waiter who served you lunch yesterday, as a couple of your high school classmates watched? The ancient Greeks thought dreams were pictures that gods put in their heads. The early Jews thought that dreams were prophetic. Sigmund Freud believed that dreams were "the royal road to the unconscious.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | By Judy Baehr, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Vincent P. Mahoney, 77, whose career in psychiatry and psychoanalysis in South Jersey spanned 40 years, died Monday at the Leader Nursing and Convalescent Center in Cherry Hill. He lived in Haddonfield. A friend and colleague, Edward Zehler, said Dr. Mahoney's "high level of energy, common sense and enthusiasm . . . has resulted in the progress of mental health and psychiatry in South Jersey over the past four decades. " After his medical training at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Dr. Mahoney was an Army medical officer in North Africa and Italy, leaving the service with the rank of colonel.
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