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American Revolution

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NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
An array of politicians, benefactors, and nonprofit leaders gathered Thursday morning beneath a vast party tent beside a very deep hole along South Third Street to celebrate the symbolic groundbreaking of the Museum of the American Revolution. When the deep hole is filled and the $119 million building opens in two years, it will be, officials believe, the nation's first museum to tell the whole story of the American Revolution - from the disgruntled grumbling over British taxes in the 1760s through the desperate days of the Continental Army in the 1770s and on to eventual independence in the 1780s.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Michael C. Quinn, 59, longtime head of the Montpelier Foundation, which operates the Virginia home of President James Madison, has been named president and chief executive officer of the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Quinn succeeds Bruce Cole, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, who left the museum last year to pursue his own writing and scholarship. Cole remains an adviser to the museum's board. "Mike Quinn has a strong background in the founding history of this nation that makes him uniquely suited to lead the center," H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, board chairman of the private American Revolution Center, nonprofit operator of the museum, said in a statement Monday.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA James Forten's life was one of the most remarkable in Philadelphia history. On Sunday, 248 years after his birth, he became the city's first black man to be identified and honored for his service in the Revolutionary War. Joseph W. Dooley, head of the Sons of the American Revolution, called him "a hero of the American Revolution, truly a great man whose life was dedicated to freedom for all Americans. " Born free, Forten was a sailor, sailmaker, and antislavery activist who became one of the wealthiest Philadelphians of his day, black or white.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Nathaniel Popkin, For The Inquirer
Terror, patriotism, the free market, racial equality: It's not farfetched to say that the issues of the American Revolution still obsess us. Now, with the announcement that a new Museum of the American Revolution will open in 2015 at Third and Chestnut, we will have a place dedicated to sorting them out. "It's a great opportunity to really deepen our understanding of the formative moment," says Daniel Richter, director of the McNeil Center for...
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an age when the fires of revolution are spread through cyberspace, it's hard to imagine that the leather-bound volumes resting in display cases at Old Christ Church once had the same incendiary effect. But the Authorized King James Edition of the Bible, translated into English 400 years ago from Latin and Greek with the aid of earlier versions, was nothing short of a radical text whose populist ethos sowed the seeds of the American Revolution. "It was the colonists' belief - which they discovered in Scripture, in English - that humankind is free because freedom is an inalienable right endowed by their divine maker," the Rev. Timothy Safford said Tuesday.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Richard R. Beeman, 74, a University of Pennsylvania historian and a trustee of the National Constitution Center, who revered America's founding document and spent decades teaching its creation and complexities, died Monday, Sept. 5, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Beeman, of Moylan, was the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History at Penn, where he was a faculty member for 43 years. "It has been my great privilege during those years to teach thousands of bright Penn undergraduates and graduate students the subject I love - the history of the American Revolution and Constitution," Dr. Beeman wrote on his website.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
Sons of the American Revolution hosted a ceremony Monday at Mikveh Israel Cemetery at which flags were placed on the graves of 17 men who fought in or helped finance the American Revolution.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
A story Monday on the Museum of the American Revolution overstated its projected cost. The current figure is $150 million.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was browsing through a flea market in New Hope about 25 years ago when he first eyed the dark, varnish-covered document behind a cracked glass pane amid other old frames. Tom Lingenfelter felt drawn to the relic, though it was "filthy and disintegrating. " Was this a souvenir copy of the Declaration of Independence issued during the nation's 1876 Centennial? Lingenfelter spotted the words Anastatic Fac-simile printed on the document, decided to buy it for $100, then stored it for about 15 years, not realizing what he had. Not until 2006, when he learned about an ingenious but destructive early copying process and compared his Declaration with another rare anastatic copy, held by the National Park Service at Independence National Historical Park.
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NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Richard R. Beeman, 74, a University of Pennsylvania historian and a trustee of the National Constitution Center, who revered America's founding document and spent decades teaching its creation and complexities, died Monday, Sept. 5, of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Beeman, of Moylan, was the John Welsh Centennial Professor of History at Penn, where he was a faculty member for 43 years. "It has been my great privilege during those years to teach thousands of bright Penn undergraduates and graduate students the subject I love - the history of the American Revolution and Constitution," Dr. Beeman wrote on his website.
REAL_ESTATE
September 5, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. It's high time we headed over to East Whiteland for a visit. After all, without this 11-square-mile Chester County community, a good many folks in this region would be unemployed. There are so many corporate headquarters in East Whiteland that every weekday, between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., the township's population of 10,650 increases by more than 23,000. Those companies include Cerner Corp.
NEWS
August 1, 2016
As thousands of folks fly out of town after the Democratic National Convention, consider the ground upon which Philadelphia International Airport sits: Hog Island, once the world's largest shipyard. Long before William Penn arrived aboard the Welcome in 1681, Swedish settlers controlled the island, at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill. The Lenape called the island Quistconck , or "place for hogs. " Hog Island made a brief cameo during the American Revolution: An order in 1777 from the Council of Safety called for the island to be flooded, to halt British troops trying to infiltrate Philadelphia via the Delaware.
NEWS
July 6, 2016
I WASN'T in Philly yet for the notorious Bicentennial non-celebration in 1976. A teenager then, I had only a vague understanding that a beyond-Nixon paranoid Mayor Frank Rizzo had warned citizens that the Manson Family was planning to spike the Schuylkill with LSD or some such thing. Everybody here stayed home (or so legend has it), and New York - with its tall ships and fireworks back in the day when people still actually liked fireworks - stole the day from Philadelphia. Again. Like DiMaggio in Game 2 of the '50 World Series all over again.
TRAVEL
July 4, 2016
Have you strolled the famous Freedom Trail in Boston? Considering that it draws more than four million visitors a year, we'd wager quite a few of you have taken in such historic sights as Old North Church ("One if by Land, Two if by Sea") and Paul Revere's house. The Freedom Trail was created in 1951, and a thriving entity has grown around it to promote tourism. In 2014, a book publisher who had already produced a successful guide to Boston's Freedom Trail approached us about writing a similar guide to Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
On Oct. 22, 1777, hundreds of Hessian troops marched on a smaller cohort of colonial soldiers, intent on taking control of Fort Mercer, an outpost on the New Jersey side of the Delaware River. The Hessians attacked on foot from two directions; in the river, six British ships had the fort blockaded. But the Americans took the Battle of Red Bank decisively. Soldiers fought valiantly on land while small American gunboats took on the British ships. The victory was a much-needed boost of morale for the colonial soldiers.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Staff Writer
The Museum of the American Revolution, whose building at Third and Chestnut Streets has been under construction for two years, plans to announce Thursday that it will open its doors to the public April 19, 2017 - the 242nd anniversary of the battles of Lexington and Concord, considered the opening of hostilities between Britain and its North American colonies. When the smoke cleared following those nasty Massachusetts skirmishes so long ago, 122 fighters on both sides had lost their lives, and the colonies were launched on a revolutionary road that would not reach the goal of independence for eight arduous years.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Carole Palmer Hare, 75, of Moorestown, a former New Jersey leader of the Daughters of the American Revolution, died at home Friday, May 27, from complications from a fall in April. From 2007 to 2010, Mrs. Hare was regent for the New Jersey State Society of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution. She had earlier been its corresponding secretary. For a time, she was also a vice chairman of its national organization. A member of the Moorestown-Isaac Burroughs Chapter of the DAR, Mrs. Hare was at times its chairman and its regent.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Dylan Purcell, Staff Writer
Under a canopy of trees, a solemn crowd gathered Monday in Washington Square Park to celebrate Memorial Day, not by reading a book on the benches or dipping their feet in the fountain, but by honoring America's first fallen soldiers. As they have for decades, organizers from the Daughters of the American Revolution and other patriotic organizations came to Philadelphia's Tomb of the Unknown Soldier to lay a wreath in recognition of casualties of that war and others that followed.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
Each morning this time of year, Ronn Shaffer strolls among the fading tombstones at the Old Pine Street Church graveyard to check on his flags. The flags marking the graves of once-forgotten patriots he has worked so hard to honor. The flags he makes sure are there every Memorial Day. A Vietnam-era Army veteran and president of the Old Pine Conservancy, Shaffer, 77, has dedicated his retirement to a noble project: identifying Revolutionary War veterans buried in the historic Society Hill graveyard - soldiers who for so long lay in obscurity.
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