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American Revolution

ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* THE BOOK OF NEGROES. 8 tonight, tomorrow and Wednesday, BET.   MINISERIES are back in vogue, commissioned by networks looking for event programming and headlined by big names who wouldn't think of committing to multiple seasons. Good as an "Olive Kitteridge" or a "Fargo" might be, they can feel, well, mini next to the blockbusters of the '70s and '80s - shows like "Roots," "The Winds of War" and "The Thorn Birds. " At six hours over three nights, BET's Canadian-produced "The Book of Negroes," which premieres tonight, is half the length of "Roots," but it's epic in scope, with a cast that includes Oscar winners Cuba Gooding Jr. and Louis Gossett Jr. (who, 38 years ago, co-starred in "Roots")
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Revolution has been re-enacted on film and video more than 130 times, according to the industry site IMDb, from the 1908 short The Spirit of '76 , to The Devil's Disciple (1959) starring Kirk Douglas and Laurence Olivier, to the Mel Gibson vehicle The Patriot in 2008. Could one more make a difference? Yes, if it happens to be John Adams , HBO's profound, unflinching mini-series from 2008 featuring Paul Giamatti in the title role. No such distinction attaches to Sons of Liberty , a three-part mini-series that will be shown on the cable channel History on consecutive nights Sunday through Tuesday.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
An array of politicians, benefactors, and nonprofit leaders gathered Thursday morning beneath a vast party tent beside a very deep hole along South Third Street to celebrate the symbolic groundbreaking of the Museum of the American Revolution. When the deep hole is filled and the $119 million building opens in two years, it will be, officials believe, the nation's first museum to tell the whole story of the American Revolution - from the disgruntled grumbling over British taxes in the 1760s through the desperate days of the Continental Army in the 1770s and on to eventual independence in the 1780s.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walton S. Sweeney Jr., 71, of Del Webb at Lake Oconee, a retirement community in Greensboro, Ga., a former Medford resident and South Jersey salesman, died Saturday, Sept. 13, of heart failure at St. Mary's Good Samaritan Hospital in Greensboro. A former member of the New Jersey chapter of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution, Mr. Sweeney was a direct descendant of John Morton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. "He was very proud of his lineage," his wife, Renee, said.
NEWS
June 11, 2014
Within days of the 70th anniversary of the pivotal D-Day landings, it's fitting that the planned Museum of the American Revolution is about to secure another objective in its march to create the nation's first museum devoted exclusively to exploring the armed struggle for colonial America's independence. Having raised fully 90 percent of their construction budget, museum officials expect to break ground in the fall at a prime location at Third and Chestnut Streets, in the city's historic district.
NEWS
June 7, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Third Street is kind of a mess these days. Demolition of the burned-out Suit Corner store at Market Street is proceeding fairly quickly. Demolition of the old Independence Park visitor center at Chestnut Street - not so quickly. "They really built that tower well," said Michael Quinn, head of the Museum of the American Revolution, referring to the building's 130-foot-high square bell tower. "It's concrete, full of rebar. The brick is only a veneer. " The visitor center, though, has got to go, and Quinn is certain that his museum, as yet a set of drawings, blueprints, and PowerPoint presentations, is on the cusp of construction.
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA James Forten's life was one of the most remarkable in Philadelphia history. On Sunday, 248 years after his birth, he became the city's first black man to be identified and honored for his service in the Revolutionary War. Joseph W. Dooley, head of the Sons of the American Revolution, called him "a hero of the American Revolution, truly a great man whose life was dedicated to freedom for all Americans. " Born free, Forten was a sailor, sailmaker, and antislavery activist who became one of the wealthiest Philadelphians of his day, black or white.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just when you thought every kind of spy story had been told, here comes AMC's new espionage drama, Turn , which tells the story of the spies who played a key part in the birth of our nation. An uneven, if promising, period drama set during the American Revolution, the series premieres at 9 p.m. on Sunday. Based on historian Alexander Rose's 2006 book, Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy , the drama chronicles the key role a group of covert agents on Long Island called the Culper Ring played in helping George Washington formulate his strategy against the British.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA They were told to make it better - Philadelphia's Art Commission would accept no less from architects designing a proposed $150 million museum devoted to the Revolutionary War. Especially one that would stand just two blocks from Independence Hall. So Wednesday, Robert A.M. Stern Architects delivered. And they were rewarded with unanimous approval of revised designs they had put together for the Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets. The panel's vote effectively clears the way for building permits to be issued in the months ahead and for construction plans to be drawn up for a hoped-for opening in late 2016.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
OLD CITY Demolition is just weeks away, and $102 million has been raised or pledged for the $150 million Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia's historic district, officials said at a ceremony Wednesday at Third and Chestnut Streets. Former Gov. Ed Rendell, who helped choose the museum site and who has assisted with fund-raising, stood amid costumed reenactors under a chilly morning sun to herald the new tourist attraction and solicit more donors for a museum that would be the only one of its kind in the nation when it opens in 2016.
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