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American Revolution

NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  On battlefields through much of the Revolutionary War and after his winter encampment at Valley Forge, Gen. George Washington worked and slept in one of two 10-foot-high, 22-foot-long tents, historians say. On April 20 and 21, officials from the planned Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia are to host a crew of eight tailors from Colonial Williamsburg who want to examine one of the original tents owned by the museum. That's because one of the originals will be displayed at the museum after it opens in 2016 at the former National Park Service Visitors Center on Third Street near Chestnut Street.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After his winter encampment at Valley Forge and on battlefields through much of the Revolutionary War, Gen. George Washington worked and slept in one of two 10-foot-high, 22-foot-long tents, historians say. On April 20 and 21, officials from the planned Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia are to host a crew of eight tailors from Colonial Williamsburg who want to examine one of the original tents owned by the museum. That's because one of the originals will be displayed at the museum after it opens in 2016 at the former National Park Service Visitors Center on Third Street near Chestnut Street.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Tom Barnes, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
JERSEY SHORE, Pa. - If you travel to this small riverfront town with the odd name, don't expect to find TV's Snooki and The Situation or see wide sandy beaches with a boardwalk and a big blue ocean. They're in another state, 250 miles to the east. But if you want to drive along the western branch of the Susquehanna River, view the changing fall foliage in the surrounding mountains, hike or bike a 65-mile trail along scenic Pine Creek, or fish and hunt in nearby state parks and forests, then this north-central Pennsylvania town of 4,000 would be worth the four-hour drive from Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When he speaks about the men and women who participated in the War of Independence, Scott Stephenson refers to them as the "First Greatest Generation. " What they accomplished in opposing the tyranny of Britain, securing freedom for the colonies, and establishing a new nation based on noble ideals is at least as impressive as the feats of those warriors who protected the United States from the imperial ambitions of Germany and Japan during World War II. Unfortunately, the heroes of the American Revolution are so remote historically, and their achievements have become so mythologized, that figures like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson have become "marbleized" - elevated to near-saintly status, scrubbed of humanity and such mortal characteristics as fear, doubt, frustration, and fatigue.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Mike Schaffer
Treacherous Beauty Peggy Shippen The Woman Behind Benedict Arnold's Plot to Betray America By Mark Jacob and Stephen H. Case Lyons Press. 279 pp. $24.95 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Nobody likes a traitor. The traitor's wife? Well, that's a different story. Especially if she happens to be a beautiful young woman so bewitching and smart she can manipulate her husband's stolid commander with her hysterics even as her double-dealing spouse completes a mad dash for enemy lines.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Oneida Nation of New York is giving $10 million toward construction of the Museum of the American Revolution, planned for Third and Chestnut Streets. The gift, one of the largest ever from the Oneidas, staunch supporters of George Washington's Continental Army, comes a month after museum backer H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest announced a $40 million museum challenge grant. The American Revolution Center seeks to raise $150 million for construction of the museum, programming, and an endowment.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
The chance to vote, to travel freely, to attend college or become a doctor - that's the American dream for children who seek U.S. citizenship. "I want to do big things," said Joseph Valdecanas,14, who moved to the United States from the Philippines seven years ago and aspires to become a news reporter and help set the agenda of the American people. Valdecanas, along with 12 other young people, now has the chance to do those "big things. " In a Fourth of July ceremony Wednesday afternoon outside the Betsy Ross House, the Department of Homeland Security's Citizenship & Immigration Services swore in the 13 children, ages 6 to 15, as citizens.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Ed Rendell
IN RECENT MONTHS I've suggested in a new book that we may have become a "nation of wusses. " The reference comes, of course, from my criticism of a decision by the National Football League to cancel an Eagles game in 2010 because of the threat of some heavy snow.   In its larger ramification, the criticism applies to us and to what our lack of courage has done to us as a nation — and the dangers we will face because of it. Fortunately, we will soon have a place in Philadelphia where we can easily draw inspiration from a time when that criticism could not have been further from the truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2012 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Robert A.M. Stern seems to be everywhere these days. Besides running Yale University's architecture school and producing architecture tomes as fat as two-by-fours, he oversees a large and successful architecture factory in New York City that can turn out buildings in any style you need. It has been doing a big business in Philadelphia.   His firm's substantial output here includes one of his finest buildings ever, the Comcast Tower, a handsome modern obelisk. He's also responsible for a truly awful one, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies on 34th Street.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest, fresh from the successful opening of the Barnes Foundation gallery on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway - where he was a key supporter of the foundation's move from the suburbs to the city - has now focused his financial energy on building a new history museum near Independence Mall. At a news conference Tuesday, the American Revolution Center is expected to unveil New York architect Robert A.M. Stern's design for a new Museum of the American Revolution at Third and Chestnut Streets, and in support of the push for the museum, Lenfest will announce a $40 million challenge grant.
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