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American Revolution

NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marjorie Fletcher Thomson Bowden, 88, of Villanova and Mantoloking, N.J., an amateur historian and descendant of a noted 19th-century silversmith, died Wednesday, Jan. 8, of cancer at Meadowood Retirement Community in Worcester Township. Mrs. Bowden assisted with research on a number of projects, including a history of Radnor Township, A Rare and Pleasing Thing by Katherine Cummin, and a book on the family history of her ancestor Jan Luyken, a Quaker who settled in Germantown in 1683.
TRAVEL
September 23, 2013 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
LONDON - In 1757, Benjamin Franklin made a drastic career change. He left behind his businesses in Philadelphia for a move to England, where he represented the diplomatic interests of the colonies. The London home of the famous Philadelphian was renovated and opened to the public in 2006, coinciding with the 300th anniversary of his birth. It's the only Franklin house in the world that's still standing. When Franklin moved into the brick townhome at 36 Craven Street, he thought he would be away for only a few months to mediate disputes between the English Parliament and the increasingly restive colonies.
NEWS
August 26, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was browsing through a flea market in New Hope about 25 years ago when he first eyed the dark, varnish-covered document behind a cracked glass pane amid other old frames. Tom Lingenfelter felt drawn to the relic, though it was "filthy and disintegrating. " Was this a souvenir copy of the Declaration of Independence issued during the nation's 1876 Centennial? Lingenfelter spotted the words Anastatic Fac-simile printed on the document, decided to buy it for $100, then stored it for about 15 years, not realizing what he had. Not until 2006, when he learned about an ingenious but destructive early copying process and compared his Declaration with another rare anastatic copy, held by the National Park Service at Independence National Historical Park.
NEWS
June 15, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
At a critical moment, with American forces in full retreat, George Washington appeared on horseback to rally his troops and turn the tide against the pursuing British. The Battle of Monmouth - June 28, 1778 - showcased Washington's leadership and the growing effectiveness of the Continental Army after its six-month encampment and drilling at Valley Forge. It will be marked Friday with the opening of an $8.5 million visitor center at Monmouth Battlefield State Park in Manalapan, N.J., and, on Saturday and Sunday, with the re-creation of the clash for its 235th anniversary, with nearly 1,000 Revolutionary War reenactors.
TRAVEL
June 9, 2013 | By Andrea Sachs, Washington Post
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - I received the message from the revolutionary agent who, despite her 18th-century dress and speech, had no time for period delivery services. When America's freedom is at stake, and the park is closing in a few hours, we patriots cannot wait for a carrier pigeon or a horseback-riding courier. My phone bleeped with the next clue in the interactive game "RevQuest: The Lion and the Unicorn. " Ever loyal to the American Revolution and my iPhone, I did as I was told.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stone walls of the house Thomas Rutter built in Berks County have remained sturdy over centuries - from the colonial period and American Revolution to the Civil War and on to the present. Within them, Rutter and his descendants were first to plot the course, in the early 1700s, of the iron industry in Pennsylvania, and later supplied munitions to George Washington's Continental Army. At the Pine Forge Mansion, overlooking the Manatawney Creek, the Rutters spoke out against slavery and turned their home into a stop on the Underground Railroad network that helped thousands of African Americans find freedom.
NEWS
April 2, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  On battlefields through much of the Revolutionary War and after his winter encampment at Valley Forge, Gen. George Washington worked and slept in one of two 10-foot-high, 22-foot-long tents, historians say. On April 20 and 21, officials from the planned Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia are to host a crew of eight tailors from Colonial Williamsburg who want to examine one of the original tents owned by the museum. That's because one of the originals will be displayed at the museum after it opens in 2016 at the former National Park Service Visitors Center on Third Street near Chestnut Street.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After his winter encampment at Valley Forge and on battlefields through much of the Revolutionary War, Gen. George Washington worked and slept in one of two 10-foot-high, 22-foot-long tents, historians say. On April 20 and 21, officials from the planned Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia are to host a crew of eight tailors from Colonial Williamsburg who want to examine one of the original tents owned by the museum. That's because one of the originals will be displayed at the museum after it opens in 2016 at the former National Park Service Visitors Center on Third Street near Chestnut Street.
TRAVEL
November 25, 2012 | By Tom Barnes, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
JERSEY SHORE, Pa. - If you travel to this small riverfront town with the odd name, don't expect to find TV's Snooki and The Situation or see wide sandy beaches with a boardwalk and a big blue ocean. They're in another state, 250 miles to the east. But if you want to drive along the western branch of the Susquehanna River, view the changing fall foliage in the surrounding mountains, hike or bike a 65-mile trail along scenic Pine Creek, or fish and hunt in nearby state parks and forests, then this north-central Pennsylvania town of 4,000 would be worth the four-hour drive from Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When he speaks about the men and women who participated in the War of Independence, Scott Stephenson refers to them as the "First Greatest Generation. " What they accomplished in opposing the tyranny of Britain, securing freedom for the colonies, and establishing a new nation based on noble ideals is at least as impressive as the feats of those warriors who protected the United States from the imperial ambitions of Germany and Japan during World War II. Unfortunately, the heroes of the American Revolution are so remote historically, and their achievements have become so mythologized, that figures like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson have become "marbleized" - elevated to near-saintly status, scrubbed of humanity and such mortal characteristics as fear, doubt, frustration, and fatigue.
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