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NEWS
January 17, 1991 | By Barbara Beck, Special to the Daily News
It wasn't the kind of letter teachers usually send home to parents. It didn't contain details about problem children or requests for lunch money. Instead, this letter talked about war. "I would like to review for you our preparations in the event that a war in the Middle East commences," read a letter to parents of children at the American School in London. "There will be increased security, entrances to the school will be limited, visitors will be screened and must sign in, all after-school programs will be canceled, and an emergency evacuation plan will be set up in the event of an attack.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theresa Howard Carter, 85, of West Chester, a distinguished archaeologist and scholar of the ancient Near East, died Sunday, April 19, at home of causes related to aging. Dr. Carter was one of a dwindling generation of pioneering women archaeologists who excavated their way across the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and North Africa. She worked during a time of discovery at some of the great dig sites of the 20th century. Her flash camera produced the first images from amid the gloom at the Midas Tomb at Gordion in Turkey during the summer of 1957.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louise C. Guthrie, 97, formerly of Wayne, a longtime public relations professional, died Monday, Sept. 22, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where she was a resident. From 1967 to 1982, Mrs. Guthrie was the director of school and community relations for the Upper Merion School District. After retiring from the school district, she ran her own public relations business. She served as a charter member and vice president of the Pennsylvania School Public Relations Association and as vice president of the Pennsylvania Community Education Association.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
From their bedroom on the campus of the American School in Kinshasa, Nelson and Lisa File could hear the sounds of guns and mortar fire from the uprising that shook Zaire's capital last month. And before they were forced to leave, they watched looters in the business district carry off refrigerators, pieces of corrugated tin roofs and even the frames for windows and doors. This week, the former teachers at the Friends Central School returned to the campus off City Avenue and told of their close-up view of an armed rebellion in the Central African country.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Holding the bowling ball firmly in his small hands, 8-year-old Lyonya Petukhov walked slowly to the foul line, bent down and rolled the ball down the alley. "Good, good, Lyonya," said a crowd of friends surrounding him at the alley's edge. Knocking down six pins brought his score to 24, not quite high enough for serious competition but a good first attempt. And for Petukhov, of Perm, Russia, Thursday's visit to Sproul Lanes in Springfield was his first to an American bowling alley.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As children marched in a circle, excitedly singing in French, Josette J. Smith was realizing a dream. "Roulez, roulez chemin de fer," the youngsters sang, as the teachers prodded them along, singing the words, clapping their hands and jumping up and down. Until this year, most of the children probably had no idea what roulez (run) meant. But after attending the French International School of Philadelphia, 16 children, ages 2 1/2 to 7, can speak and do classwork in French. In September, the school population will nearly double and add a third grade.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As children marched in a circle, excitedly singing in French, Josette J. Smith was realizing a dream. "Roulez roulez chemin de fer," the youngsters sang, as the teachers prodded them along, singing the words, clapping their hands and jumping up and down. Until this year, most of the children probably had no idea what roulez (run) meant. But after attending the French International School of Philadelphia, 16 children ages 3 to 8 can speak and do classwork in French. In September, the school population will nearly double and a third grade will be added.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Patrick Quinn and Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Islamic militants sought Tuesday to capitalize on anger over an anti-Islam video that was produced in the United States, saying a suicide bombing that killed 12 people in Afghanistan was revenge for the film and calling for attacks on U.S. diplomats and facilities in North Africa. The attempt by extremists across the region to harness Muslim fury over a film that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad posed new concern for the United States, whose embassies and consulates have been targeted, and in some cases breached, during riots and protests over the past week.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Gerhard Miller, 78, of Doylestown, a teacher and headmaster for more than 40 years, died Monday, Sept. 1, of heart disease at his home. Mr. Miller was a descendant of two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Arthur Middleton and John Rutledge, both of South Carolina. His great-uncle George S. Gerhard founded Bryn Mawr Hospital. The George S. Gerhard Society, created in 1979, helps raise money for the hospital. Mr. Miller began his teaching career at the Haverford School in 1962.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | By Rose Simmons, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The nation's economy was crashing all about him in 1929 when Froelich Gladstone Rainey boarded a commercial steamer in San Francisco to seek a wealth of experiences that he was sure would be useful for his first great American novel. He got the experiences, and they read like an adventure novel: selling 10- gallon tins of kerosene along roadsides in the Philippines, spending a night in a Cairo jail for carrying a gun, being stranded penniless in Shanghai during the Depression and supporting himself for a time as a Monte Carlo gambler.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Mark C. Alexander, named Friday as the new dean of Villanova University's Charles Widger School of Law, has had a long and varied career as a law school administrator and scholar, a litigator, and even a political adviser and candidate. He served at one time as senior adviser for President Obama's 2008 presidential election campaign, and once ran for office - unsuccessfully, in the Democratic primary for the New Jersey Senate in 2013. He has been widely published, and is known as an expert on the First Amendment.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theresa Howard Carter, 85, of West Chester, a distinguished archaeologist and scholar of the ancient Near East, died Sunday, April 19, at home of causes related to aging. Dr. Carter was one of a dwindling generation of pioneering women archaeologists who excavated their way across the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and North Africa. She worked during a time of discovery at some of the great dig sites of the 20th century. Her flash camera produced the first images from amid the gloom at the Midas Tomb at Gordion in Turkey during the summer of 1957.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Louise C. Guthrie, 97, formerly of Wayne, a longtime public relations professional, died Monday, Sept. 22, of heart failure at Beaumont at Bryn Mawr, where she was a resident. From 1967 to 1982, Mrs. Guthrie was the director of school and community relations for the Upper Merion School District. After retiring from the school district, she ran her own public relations business. She served as a charter member and vice president of the Pennsylvania School Public Relations Association and as vice president of the Pennsylvania Community Education Association.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Gerhard Miller, 78, of Doylestown, a teacher and headmaster for more than 40 years, died Monday, Sept. 1, of heart disease at his home. Mr. Miller was a descendant of two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Arthur Middleton and John Rutledge, both of South Carolina. His great-uncle George S. Gerhard founded Bryn Mawr Hospital. The George S. Gerhard Society, created in 1979, helps raise money for the hospital. Mr. Miller began his teaching career at the Haverford School in 1962.
NEWS
September 19, 2012 | By Patrick Quinn and Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
KABUL, Afghanistan - Islamic militants sought Tuesday to capitalize on anger over an anti-Islam video that was produced in the United States, saying a suicide bombing that killed 12 people in Afghanistan was revenge for the film and calling for attacks on U.S. diplomats and facilities in North Africa. The attempt by extremists across the region to harness Muslim fury over a film that denigrates the Prophet Muhammad posed new concern for the United States, whose embassies and consulates have been targeted, and in some cases breached, during riots and protests over the past week.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The painting was instantly seen in Europe as so profound, so dignified, so good , that the French government, eager to purchase, practically tore it off the walls of the Salon du Champs-Élysées. That was in 1897. Henry Ossawa Tanner's The Resurrection of Lazarus immediately entered the collection of the Musée du Luxembourg and then the Musée d'Orsay - a treasure belonging to the French people. But the painting never appeared in Tanner's homeland, never crossed the Atlantic to the United States, never traveled to Philadelphia, where the artist studied intermittently at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under the tough gaze of Thomas Eakins.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite seeming victories for evolution over creationism in major court battles - most recently in Dover, Pa. - American students are still losing out when it comes to getting a solid biology education. A new report on a 2007 national survey of high school biology teachers found that most still didn't teach evolution adequately. And today, evolution is more than just a chapter in the biology field; it's the backbone of the whole discipline. "Nothing counts in biology except evolution," said Haig Kazazian, former chair of genetics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and now a professor at Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
October 14, 2009 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Four boys assault their teacher, who later dies of her injuries. Across the country, newspapers compete to unearth the most lurid details of the episode. It seems the boys were annoyed at being detained after school. So they threw rocks and other debris at the screaming teacher, until she couldn't scream anymore. A modern-day example of inner-city youth violence? Hardly. It happened in the small town of Canton, Mass. - in 1870. I thought of the Canton tragedy as I watched Attorney General Eric Holder at last week's news conference about youth violence in Chicago.
SPORTS
April 2, 2009 | By ANDY KENT, For the Daily News
CORAL GABLES, Fla. - There was nothing left for Maalik Wayns to do on this trip to South Florida than have some fun, especially on the basketball court, and that's precisely what the Roman Catholic High senior did last night at the BankUnited Center. Wayns started at point guard for the East team in the 32nd annual McDonald's All American High School Boys Basketball Game, broadcast on ESPN. He helped his team come back from an eight-point deficit at the half to pull out a 113-110 victory, dishing out seven assists to go along with his five points.
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