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American Sign Language

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NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Betty Woodward set up a four-week course in American Sign Language at the senior center where she works, she had no idea how much interest it would generate. Woodward is program coordinator at the Friendship Circle Senior Center on the Mercy Fitzgerald Medical Campus in Darby, Delaware County. The instructor is her daughter, Beth Vail, 46, of East Lansdowne. The course is held each Wednesday morning in June, and its second session has just finished. Already Vail, who is hearing-impaired, has been getting numerous requests to bring the program to other locations.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / WILLIAM F. STEINMETZ
Deaf poet Peter Cook encourages Randy Spann to express with his face as Joseph Conard watches at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Germantown. Cook, who has performed around the country, is visiting through Feb. 8 to help students and teachers explore American Sign Language. He will present a benefit performance Friday. For more information on the benefit or the workshops, call 215-951-4720.
NEWS
March 9, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Michael Mally
With the help of professional performers, children at the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Germantown are preparing to put on a play. The actors - four from the Fairmount Theatre of the Deaf and one from the National Theatre of the Deaf - are spending a month at the school as part of the U.S. Education Department's "Instant Theatre" program. The workshops in Philadelphia, one of just four places the troupe will visit this year, end March 19. The result will be a play called "Owl Be," staged in a combination of American Sign Language and spoken English.
NEWS
December 17, 2010
RE DOM Giordano's op-ed on American Sign Language: Running it was like publishing an article by a neo-Nazi degrading Hebrew and Jewish culture, or like publishing an author who openly condones genocide. As a deaf person, what I got from reading this article is that I'm less human and I need to be fixed medically, therefore my language and culture is inferior and it's acceptable to wipe it out through cultural genocide. Tim Riker, Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
No matter how high the noise level at the Montgomery Mall food court, Neil McDevitt and his friends have no trouble communicating. They meet at the mall at 6 p.m. every Friday to eat, relax and be themselves - people who communicate through American Sign Language. "When you work in a hearing environment, a person who is deaf can feel like a fish out of water. You spend a lot of time lip reading; you can get a headache," McDevitt, 28, of North Wales, signed. "When we come here, we can relax and feel normal.
NEWS
November 16, 2003 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A textbook nearby as a reference, Kasey Mascitti began working on a seventh-grade science project. Mascitti typed the first few sentences of an outline when she realized something did not look quite right. The laptop computer's word-processing program helped Mascitti, who has a hearing impairment, recognize and correct her spelling and grammatical mistakes, said Sister Margaret Langer, principal of Archbishop Ryan School for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. "Kasey types the words the way she hears them.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | by Drew McQuade, Daily News Sports Writer
Gina Riccobono changes a room when she walks into it. Her infectious smile lights it up. She's an attractive teen-ager who's extremely expressive when she talks. The conversation is rapid-fire, forcing you to concentrate. You want to know what she's saying, even though you can't understand a word without an interpreter. Gina Riccobono was born deaf. Strange as it seems, the room grows noisier when she arrives. She's all hands and smiles and body language. And she has so much to say. Gina is standing with her back against the counter of the Lincoln High School flower shop, which also serves as Karen Kardon Weber's horticulture class.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They're huge. Loud. Flashy. And surrounded by thousands of tons of dirt. If you're a kid, what's not to love about the U.S. Hot Rod Association Monster Jam? That's monster as in monster trucks, the machines with regular-size bodies on enormously oversize wheels. Grave Digger, Blue Thunder, and other visions of metal and motor excess will pull into the Wachovia Spectrum for four shows, beginning tonight. Power Forward, the 1999 Ford F-150 owned by the Los Angeles Lakers' Karl Malone, will make its Philadelphia debut.
NEWS
September 30, 2001 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Cosmetics case in hand, Betty Levis is a familiar and welcome visitor at Valley View, an assisted-living home here. Every Wednesday for 19 years, she has spent time with the home's residents, ages 59 to 100, who are deaf, or deaf and blind. She brings her smile, conversation and a bit of color into the residents' lives by giving free manicures with a loving touch, said resident Dorothy Jacobs, 94. "Betty is wonderful. She always asks everyone what she can do for them and is always patient," Jacobs said.
NEWS
June 11, 2002 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When he saw the thumbs-down gesture, Toan Nguyen, a Vietnamese immigrant who is deaf and cannot speak, learned yesterday that a Delaware County jury had convicted him of molesting a boy. The verdict came as Nguyen was surrounded by his attorney and four interpreters - two of them deaf, two able to hear, and as a group, able to translate among Vietnamese sign language, American Sign Language and spoken English. Defense attorney Frank Halloran had assembled the two teams of interpreters - each consisting of one deaf and one hearing sign-language interpreter.
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NEWS
March 4, 2013
* SWITCHED AT BIRTH. 8 p.m. Monday, ABC Family.   WARNING: The commercials may seem louder during ABC Family's "Switched at Birth" this week. That's because most of the episode will be in American Sign Language. (There will be subtitles.) Now in its second season, the show about two teens - one deaf, Daphne (Katie Leclerc), and one hearing, Bay (Vanessa Marano) - who were accidentally raised by one another's biological families has intensified its focus on the deaf community.
NEWS
December 21, 2012
* PROJECT NIM. 9 p.m. Thursday, HBO. IF NIM Chimpsky were alive today and his life had gone a little differently, he might have his own raucous "reality" show on MTV instead of just the occasional appearance on "Sesame Street. " Maybe even a clothing line. And thanks to the American Humane Association's production guidelines, he'd likely have a saner life than he did at the hands of the people who, in the name of science, took a baby chimpanzee from his mother to be raised like a human child, taught him to speak in sign language - and to smoke pot - and then passed him along like an outgrown toy. That, at least, was what I took away from "Project Nim," a fascinating, infuriating 2011 documentary about a sloppily run 1970s experiment that makes its television debut on HBO Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Barbara Evans Sorid, For The Inquirer
Eddie Aldridge has been working the National Deaf Poker Tour for six years now. He's learned that dealing to deaf people is not unlike dealing to anyone else, since poker, by nature, is played mostly with nonverbal communication. Certainly, there's no "raise" and "call" to be heard; instead players use hand signals - a thumbs up or two fingers to the ear. But there are big differences at these tournaments, he said, and it's what you can't hear. "The camaraderie, the spirit, the brotherhood," says Aldridge, 48. "Something that you will never see at regular poker tables is clapping for a winner.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | Joalisa De Jesus ?is a student at Argosy University
There are challenges to being hearing-impaired when it comes to basic workplace and social activities that other people take for granted. We struggle with cellphone plans. Job interviewers are often unprepared to deal with us. Even going to the movies can be a hassle. Let's start with cellphones. What good are voice minutes to us? They could offer us voice hours and we still couldn't use them. We feel like we are throwing money out the window. Text messaging is either bundled into the voice and data plan, or it's an added service for a fee. I understand the cellphone companies are concerned about profit, so why not offer an unlimited text and limited Web plan?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2012 | BY MARY SYDNOR, For the Daily News
AT TRADITIONAL poetry events, poets read their written work aloud. But this weekend, Swarthmore College shows that not all poetry is composed in a written language, or even in a language that can be spoken. "Signing Hands Across the Water" is a sign language poetry festival featuring American and British poets who express themselves through movement rather than by speaking. The festival is the work of Rachel Sutton-Spence, a reader in Deaf Studies at Britain's Bristol University and a visiting professor at Swarthmore this year.
NEWS
November 5, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A deaf, mute, and illiterate man charged in a Montgomery County drug trafficking case will never be able to stand trial because of his inability to communicate, his attorney said in court filings. Lawyers petitioned Common Pleas Court last week to drop charges against Juan Jose Gonzalez Luna, 43, due to his supposed powerlessness to participate in his own defense or understand the legal proceedings against him. His case - part of an investigation into an international drug smuggling ring based in King of Prussia - has drawn attention to the challenges defendants with limited language capabilities pose to the legal system - obstacles, prosecutors say, that made Gonzalez a perfect criminal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2011 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
How likely is it that the commedia dell'arte character Pierrot, a passel of peculiar primatologists, and a chimp could come together in the same story? It happened last weekend at Community Education Center in S onso, Simians & Pierrot , a physical dance-theater piece by the center's New Edge resident artist, Marcel Williams Foster, who tied them up in a neat little package - and in the funniest kind of way. As we enter the performance space, five "scientists" in lab coats greet us and we realize we are playing attendees at a conference.
NEWS
December 17, 2010
RE DOM Giordano's op-ed on American Sign Language: Running it was like publishing an article by a neo-Nazi degrading Hebrew and Jewish culture, or like publishing an author who openly condones genocide. As a deaf person, what I got from reading this article is that I'm less human and I need to be fixed medically, therefore my language and culture is inferior and it's acceptable to wipe it out through cultural genocide. Tim Riker, Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
November 20, 2010 | By Bobby Olivier, Inquirer Staff Writer
For many deaf children, visits to a mall Santa Claus involve handing over a written list, not rattling off desires with typical Christmas excitement. But what if the jolly man in the red suit could communicate with them one-on-one? What if Santa knew sign language? Dan Swartz, 55, of Cherry Hill, a nationally certified interpreter, describes working as a "signing Santa" in Maryland in the early 1990s as "overwhelming. " Used to being disappointed, many of the children couldn't fathom Santa communicating with them in such a way, he said.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Toward the end of lunch, Phoenix Ferragame, 17 months old, raised both hands in front of his chest and tapped his fingertips together. His mother smiled. "You want more ? More chips?" Gina Ferragame asked, mimicking the hand movement and then passing the bowl to her son. For parents, hardly anything is as satisfying as being able to communicate with their children. But speech requires development of three muscle groups. Toddlers typically have motor control of their hands and fingers months sooner.
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