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American Spirit

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NEWS
September 16, 2005 | By Marie A. Conn
Hatboro is an old, small, highly walkable town. Every day, as I run errands, mail letters, or just get some exercise, I bump into the people of my town and am reminded of one America. This America is full of good, honest, hard-working people, the kind who live the values politicians love to talk about. The merchants are friendly and helpful. Sure, they need your business, but they truly care about their customers. The police and volunteer firefighters are never far away, and - I speak from experience here - even getting a ticket is an exercise in civility.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Joe Clark contributed to this report
The Presidents' Summit - a balancing act of politics and national imperative, glitz and genuinely good stuff - has teetered and tottered. But everyone's still on board for a three-year ride that starts today. The central goal of providing critical resources to the nation's youth at risk was dramatized at Independence Hall yesterday by four presidents, a first lady, a general - and lots of kids. In fact, the summit will end today like a chorus from "Home on the Range" - "where seldom is heard a discouraging word.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There weren't any battles fought at Valley Forge, but some say the real fighting there began when the Continental Army marched out in 1778. One of them is Lorett Treese, a Paoli historian and author, whose book, Valley Forge: Making and Remaking a National Symbol, picks up the history of the national landmark after the soldiers left. Valley Forge - which after the encampment became a shrine to the American spirit - evolved into a state park, a national symbol, and finally a national park.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2008 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If today's economic outlook has you (or your grandparents) harking back to the Great Depression, take heart: A roster of free public events this weekend is designed to evoke the hopeful spirit fostered in the wake of those grim days. The Posters for the People Expo Festival marks the 75th anniversary of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal - an alphabet soup of programs created to restore the nation's spirit, as well as its economy. Chief among the New Deal programs was the Works Progress Administration (WPA)
LIVING
November 12, 1992 | By Carol Horner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A picture-perfect antidote to financial scandal. That's what the United Way of America needed, and that's what it seems to have found in Elaine Chao, who will take over as president Monday. Rocked last winter by revelations that the previous president, William Aramony, spent lavishly on personal comforts - Concorde tickets, chauffeured limousines, condominiums purchased through a United Way spinoff corporation - the organization launched an exhaustive search for his replacement after Aramony resigned under pressure in February.
NEWS
November 29, 2002
The cars we build and drive are moral choices. Perhaps no other modern invention comes closer to embodying the American spirit of ingenuity, freedom, and adventure. From the workers on the assembly line to the engineers and visionaries in the boardroom, the auto industry has provided economic growth, employment and leisure. . . . But when automobiles cause climate change, pollution, and . . . a dangerous dependence on foreign oil, we face a moral challenge. Can we build cars that give us freedom and mobility, reduce the impact on our environment, and increase our national security, especially for future generations?
NEWS
August 23, 1986
In his Aug. 3 column "Coming back from the chaos of the Vietnam era" Tom Fox continues his myopic tirade against those who showed dissent during and after the Vietnam War. Unfortunately for him and the government, the facts stand squarely in support of the dissenters. It is acknowledged that the war was never waged for the preservation of the (non-existent) South Vietnamese democracy or for our defense. Americans were misled and cheated. American boys were used as cannon fodder.
NEWS
September 10, 2002
HOW WILL I DEAL with this anniversary? I will mourn the tragic, senseless loss of life and pray for the victims, their families and the survivors of that horrifying day. Then I will prove in my small way to all who would try to destroy this country and its people that they cannot defeat the American spirit or resolve by celebrating my birthday, which happens to be on Sept. 11. I will celebrate with my beautiful family, ranging in age from my 5-year-old daughter to my 81-year-old father.
NEWS
July 19, 1992
"I proudly accept your nomination for president of the United States. " - Bill Clinton "Frankly, I'm fed up with politicians in Washington lecturing Americans about "family values. " Our families have values. But our government doesn't. " - Bill Clinton "Bill Clinton believes - as we all here do - in the first principle of our commitment: the politics of inclusion - the solemn obligation to create opportunity for all our people, not just the fit and the fortunate.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By John J. Rooney
William James died 100 years ago today, but his influence is still with us. He contributed mightily to the early growth of psychology, writing the first textbook, establishing the first demonstration laboratory, and teaching the first course on the subject. A sibling of novelist Henry and diarist Alice, James was educated in a variety of schools in America and abroad - none of which seemed to suit his father, a brilliant eccentric who preferred the kind of informal education that took place in spirited discussions around the family dinner table.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Can't play without the best It's already apparent that the Phillies without Chase Utley and Ryan Howard are comparable to my wonderful Philadelphia Orchestra attempting to play the masterful "Ninth Symphony" without the services of concertmaster David Kim and the first violin section. It's just not going to happen, either at Citizens Bank Park or Verizon Hall. Jules Slatko, Holland Save the United States Joe Henwood aptly describes the concept, design, and construction of the SS United States as exemplifying the "can do" attitude of our country in his call to action to save that iconic symbol of the American spirit from being reduced to a scrap heap, quite likely in a foreign scrap yard ("Time to rescue another great ship," April 15)
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | By Megan Ritchie
"An old man sat on the sidewalk, placed a hat in front of his crossed legs, and a sign next to them that read: 'I am blind. Please help me,' " my student began. An Egyptian psychologist, Professor Saleh, along with two other visiting professors, was taking English lessons funded by a grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The professors were to publish in an American journal during a nine-month stay in the United States, and I was to help them make sure their writing was appropriately polished.
NEWS
August 26, 2010 | By John J. Rooney
William James died 100 years ago today, but his influence is still with us. He contributed mightily to the early growth of psychology, writing the first textbook, establishing the first demonstration laboratory, and teaching the first course on the subject. A sibling of novelist Henry and diarist Alice, James was educated in a variety of schools in America and abroad - none of which seemed to suit his father, a brilliant eccentric who preferred the kind of informal education that took place in spirited discussions around the family dinner table.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They ate barbecue on a Coast Guard cutter in the Delaware River Monday, smiling and laughing, only occasionally talking about the terrible days that bond them. They are old now - many well into their 80s - with rough hands and slow gaits. Like any other tourists, they snapped photos, floating on brown water under gray skies on a cruise created in their honor. The pictures were benign counterpoints to the awful images that every member of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge carries in his head.
NEWS
March 18, 2009 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For 23 years, Ed Kennedy has brought busloads of students from Scarsdale, N.Y., to Washington Crossing Historic Park in Bucks County. The site of George Washington's pivotal crossing of the Delaware in 1776 is "a magnificent place, full of real history," Kennedy, principal of the Seely Place School, said as 61 excited fifth graders piled out of the visitor center yesterday morning. Kennedy was "horrified" to learn that the center, focal point of Pennsylvania's most popular state-run historical site, might soon close.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
"Project Superpowers" was one of the industry's biggest hits this year and exceeded even Dynamite's most optimistic expectations in terms of both buzz and sales. What is refreshing is that it is a comic that deserves its success and the accolades bestowed upon it. Once it was announced that artist extraordinaire Alex Ross would be co-plotting the book (along with frequent collaborator Jim Krueger) and doing painted covers for the series, it was certain to stand out from the pack on the racks, as all the Ross comics tend to do. What makes this "Project" truly special, however, is that Ross designed every new character in its pages.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2008 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If today's economic outlook has you (or your grandparents) harking back to the Great Depression, take heart: A roster of free public events this weekend is designed to evoke the hopeful spirit fostered in the wake of those grim days. The Posters for the People Expo Festival marks the 75th anniversary of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal - an alphabet soup of programs created to restore the nation's spirit, as well as its economy. Chief among the New Deal programs was the Works Progress Administration (WPA)
NEWS
March 17, 2008
What does being Irish mean? Beer and parties on St. Patrick's? Music, big families, immigrant stories? How about openness? Events today and in the near future are reminders that the Irish experience connects with the experience of all Americans. Today at 10 a.m., a fifth annual commemoration will take place at the National Irish Memorial at Front and Chestnut Streets. They're celebrating not just the memorial, but also the story it tells. On April 6, the Irish Memorial Run (www.
NEWS
May 7, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The old man in Arizona belonged to no religion, but at 86 committed himself to creating "a temple that is truly a religious tribute to the living God. " And if God is anything like Frank Lloyd Wright's soaring masterpiece of concrete and glass in Elkins Park, he is as remote as a mountain and as intimate as a garden. He is luminous and brooding, aloof yet embracing, unpretty but beautiful. America's premier architect would never know if visitors to his Beth Sholom Synagogue felt they were "resting in the very hands of God," as he hoped they would.
NEWS
September 16, 2005 | By Marie A. Conn
Hatboro is an old, small, highly walkable town. Every day, as I run errands, mail letters, or just get some exercise, I bump into the people of my town and am reminded of one America. This America is full of good, honest, hard-working people, the kind who live the values politicians love to talk about. The merchants are friendly and helpful. Sure, they need your business, but they truly care about their customers. The police and volunteer firefighters are never far away, and - I speak from experience here - even getting a ticket is an exercise in civility.
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