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BUSINESS
October 9, 1998 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Cynthia Burton contributed to this story
After going overseas for a $24 million crane contract, Kvaerner Philadelphia is going American - though out of state - to award a $35.4 million structural steel contract for the shipyard it is building in South Philadelphia. Kvaerner also said it had awarded construction contracts worth $14.3 million to women- or minority-owned firms. Kvaerner's contract decisions have come under scrutiny by the Pennsylvania Auditor General, and yesterday the Philadelphia City Council voted to investigate Kvaerner's contracting system.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Around the turn of the century, American steel production reached 10 million tons annually. This helped to make this country one of the greatest industrial nations in the world. The Bessemer smelting process, an abundant supply of coal and iron ore, a huge unskilled workforce made up of new waves of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and the development of large steel corporations were contributing factors. Locally, the Alan Wood Iron & Steel Co. followed the same pattern of growth as the large national "big steel" operations.
NEWS
December 5, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
President Bush yesterday scrapped import tariffs he had imposed last year to help the battered U.S. steel industry, defusing a threatened trade war with Europe and Japan but creating political problems for himself in states that could be key in next year's election. The White House denied bowing to pressure, declaring that the 21 months the steep tariffs had been in place had given the U.S. industry a chance to consolidate and modernize and were no longer needed as a result of "changed economic circumstances.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A federal bankruptcy judge yesterday approved a plan that could put about 400 Phoenix Steel Corp. employees back to work at the company's idle plant in Claymont by October. The plant's new owner, Way Hing & Co. of Hong Kong, will take a "very favorable" look at former Phoenix workers when interviewing candidates, which the company plans to begin before June 1, when the sale is scheduled to close, said Carl Fernandes, attorney for Way Hing. Way Hing's owner, L. H. Chang, testified yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court that the mill would be operating under a new name, not yet chosen, within four months after the sale closing.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2012 | By Jennifer M. Freedman, Bloomberg News
China broke global commerce rules by imposing anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on more than $200 million of U.S. steel products, the World Trade Organization said in a ruling Friday. Judges agreed with the U.S. that China failed to prove that imports of grain-oriented flat-rolled electrical steel, produced by companies such as West Chester, Ohio-based AK Steel Holding Corp. and Pittsburgh-based ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corp. had caused injury to Chinese rivals. The panel also found that China began its anti-subsidy proceedings without adequate evidence showing U.S. companies were receiving illegal government aid. "China simply has to play by the rules to which it agreed when it joined the World Trade Organization 10 years ago," U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Howard Brod Brownstein
The bankruptcy filing of Bethlehem Steel Corp. last week is a somber but historic milestone for American industry. With roots extending back before the Civil War and existing in its present form for nearly a century, Bethlehem Steel has been a longtime pillar of the nation's economy, with its greatest influence in Pennsylvania. But as grim as Bethlehem's bankruptcy filing is, it has not been unexpected, as about two dozen other American steelmakers have gone bankrupt since 1998.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Around the turn of the century, American steel production reached 10 million tons annually. This helped to make this country one of the greatest industrial nations in the world. The Bessemer smelting process, an abundant supply of coal and iron ore, a huge unskilled workforce made up of new waves of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and the development of large steel corporations were contributing factors. Locally, the Alan Wood Iron & Steel Co. followed the same pattern of growth as the large national "big steel" operations.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Lukens Inc. of Coatesville, buoyed by better-than-expected earnings last year, expects 1989 will be another strong year, company officials said at last month's stockholders' meeting. Lukens' 1988 sales of $605 million surpassed the company's goal of $500 million, and earnings of $33 million surpassed the company's $20 million goal. W. R. Wilson, chairman and chief executive officer, said that recent plant shutdowns were a result of the installation of new technology in the plate- rolling mills, which will cause "short-term increases in expense and decreases in second-quarter production.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan yesterday nominated C. William Verity Jr., a retired steel company chairman who favors increased U.S.-Soviet trade, to succeed the late Malcolm Baldrige as secretary of commerce. Verity, 70, retired in 1982 as chairman of Armco Inc. in Middletown, Ohio, a leading American steel company founded in 1900 by his grandfather. Verity, a former chairman of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, met Reagan in 1981 when he was named chairman of a presidential task force that sought ways to encourage more private-sector support for government social programs.
NEWS
May 22, 1990
FLAG BURNING CAN NEVER BE LEGITIMATE PROTEST Someone once said, "Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad. " I would add: starting with the Supreme Court. Only the dementia caused by too much splitting of fly specks can explain its equating flag burning with freedom of speech. This constitutional protection refers only to the right to dissent philosophically, vocally, actively, financially, etc. It does not condone, justify or encourage violence. A difference of opinion may be expressed in many ways, but never by destroying anything or hurting anyone physically.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 2012 | By Jennifer M. Freedman, Bloomberg News
China broke global commerce rules by imposing anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on more than $200 million of U.S. steel products, the World Trade Organization said in a ruling Friday. Judges agreed with the U.S. that China failed to prove that imports of grain-oriented flat-rolled electrical steel, produced by companies such as West Chester, Ohio-based AK Steel Holding Corp. and Pittsburgh-based ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corp. had caused injury to Chinese rivals. The panel also found that China began its anti-subsidy proceedings without adequate evidence showing U.S. companies were receiving illegal government aid. "China simply has to play by the rules to which it agreed when it joined the World Trade Organization 10 years ago," U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said.
NEWS
December 5, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
President Bush yesterday scrapped import tariffs he had imposed last year to help the battered U.S. steel industry, defusing a threatened trade war with Europe and Japan but creating political problems for himself in states that could be key in next year's election. The White House denied bowing to pressure, declaring that the 21 months the steep tariffs had been in place had given the U.S. industry a chance to consolidate and modernize and were no longer needed as a result of "changed economic circumstances.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Howard Brod Brownstein
The bankruptcy filing of Bethlehem Steel Corp. last week is a somber but historic milestone for American industry. With roots extending back before the Civil War and existing in its present form for nearly a century, Bethlehem Steel has been a longtime pillar of the nation's economy, with its greatest influence in Pennsylvania. But as grim as Bethlehem's bankruptcy filing is, it has not been unexpected, as about two dozen other American steelmakers have gone bankrupt since 1998.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1998 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Cynthia Burton contributed to this story
After going overseas for a $24 million crane contract, Kvaerner Philadelphia is going American - though out of state - to award a $35.4 million structural steel contract for the shipyard it is building in South Philadelphia. Kvaerner also said it had awarded construction contracts worth $14.3 million to women- or minority-owned firms. Kvaerner's contract decisions have come under scrutiny by the Pennsylvania Auditor General, and yesterday the Philadelphia City Council voted to investigate Kvaerner's contracting system.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Around the turn of the century, American steel production reached 10 million tons annually. This helped to make this country one of the greatest industrial nations in the world. The Bessemer smelting process, an abundant supply of coal and iron ore, a huge unskilled workforce made up of new waves of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and the development of large steel corporations were contributing factors. Locally, the Alan Wood Iron & Steel Co. followed the same pattern of growth as the large national "big steel" operations.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Around the turn of the century, American steel production reached 10 million tons annually. This helped to make this country one of the greatest industrial nations in the world. The Bessemer smelting process, an abundant supply of coal and iron ore, a huge unskilled workforce made up of new waves of immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and the development of large steel corporations were contributing factors. Locally, the Alan Wood Iron & Steel Co. followed the same pattern of growth as the large national "big steel" operations.
NEWS
May 22, 1990
FLAG BURNING CAN NEVER BE LEGITIMATE PROTEST Someone once said, "Whom the gods would destroy they first make mad. " I would add: starting with the Supreme Court. Only the dementia caused by too much splitting of fly specks can explain its equating flag burning with freedom of speech. This constitutional protection refers only to the right to dissent philosophically, vocally, actively, financially, etc. It does not condone, justify or encourage violence. A difference of opinion may be expressed in many ways, but never by destroying anything or hurting anyone physically.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Lukens Inc. of Coatesville, buoyed by better-than-expected earnings last year, expects 1989 will be another strong year, company officials said at last month's stockholders' meeting. Lukens' 1988 sales of $605 million surpassed the company's goal of $500 million, and earnings of $33 million surpassed the company's $20 million goal. W. R. Wilson, chairman and chief executive officer, said that recent plant shutdowns were a result of the installation of new technology in the plate- rolling mills, which will cause "short-term increases in expense and decreases in second-quarter production.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
A federal bankruptcy judge yesterday approved a plan that could put about 400 Phoenix Steel Corp. employees back to work at the company's idle plant in Claymont by October. The plant's new owner, Way Hing & Co. of Hong Kong, will take a "very favorable" look at former Phoenix workers when interviewing candidates, which the company plans to begin before June 1, when the sale is scheduled to close, said Carl Fernandes, attorney for Way Hing. Way Hing's owner, L. H. Chang, testified yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court that the mill would be operating under a new name, not yet chosen, within four months after the sale closing.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | By Owen Ullmann, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan yesterday nominated C. William Verity Jr., a retired steel company chairman who favors increased U.S.-Soviet trade, to succeed the late Malcolm Baldrige as secretary of commerce. Verity, 70, retired in 1982 as chairman of Armco Inc. in Middletown, Ohio, a leading American steel company founded in 1900 by his grandfather. Verity, a former chairman of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, met Reagan in 1981 when he was named chairman of a presidential task force that sought ways to encourage more private-sector support for government social programs.
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