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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
University City, that artificially created place on the west bank of the Schuylkill, has suddenly become Philadelphia's most vital neighborhood. You can see it in the luxury high-rises, office towers, and dorms now coalescing into a glittering second skyline. Just last week, Penn and Drexel held a party to celebrate their economic contribution to the city, which is indeed substantial. Today, Penn reigns supreme as Philadelphia's largest private employer, with nearly 16,000 full-timers on its payroll.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Pether, 55, of Haverford, a law professor at Villanova University, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of cancer at Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Pether was a widely published legal scholar, specializing in the theory and practice of judging in the federal courts; feminist legal theory; the history of racial discrimination; and rape-law reform. "Penny Pether was a well-respected educator, dedicated mentor, and beloved friend and colleague," said John Gotanda, dean of the Villanova School of Law. "Her passion for teaching was immeasurable, and her death is a tremendous loss for the Villanova Law community.
NEWS
July 8, 1998
Edward Smith was misidentified on yesterday's Commentary Page. Smith is a member of the advisory board of the Jefferson Davis Presidential Library and is the director of the American studies program and a professor of anthropology at American University in Washington.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bonnie Blank is about 40 years older than a traditional college student, but she hasn't stopped going to class. One Day University is an adult education program, offered throughout the country, that recruits top university professors to lecture at single-day learning opportunities. Through the program, Blank has been able to quench her thirst for learning without signing up for a full semester. She plans to attend one such event Sunday at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The event is sponsored by The Inquirer.
SPORTS
December 3, 1999 | By Beth Huffman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Nicole McCarthy, who helped the Springfield field hockey team claim the PIAA District 1 Class AA championship just a few weeks ago, will play lacrosse on scholarship at American University in Washington. "I love the D.C. area," said McCarthy, who is a defensive wing in lacrosse. "The coach [Maureen Scott Dupcak] came to one of my hockey games. She's young, and I really like her and the team. The campus was great, not too big, not too small, and it was close enough to home. I feel I can get a lot out of the school.
NEWS
October 22, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
A prominent Christian Lebanese teacher at the American University of Beirut has been released more than five months after he was seized in Muslim west Beirut. Meanwhile, another American was kidnapped. Dina Matar, wife of Nabil Matar, told Reuters her husband arrived at their west Beirut home last night. "He is in good shape and today reported to work at the university. " Matar, 37, was seized May 7, setting off emotional protests and strikes by American University teachers and students.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
With Lt. Col. William Richard Higgins' fate uncertain, eight American men - six educators, a journalist and a writer - are presumed to be prisoners of Shiite Muslim extremists in Lebanon. TERRY ANDERSON 41, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, kidnapped March 16, 1985. The pro-Iran Shiite group Islamic Jihad, or Islamic Holy War, claims to hold him. THOMAS SUTHERLAND 58, Scottish-born acting dean of agriculture at the American University of Beirut, kidnapped June 9, 1985.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
In June 1909, Alice Paul sent a letter to her mother from London. "Dear Mamma. . . I have joined the 'suffragettes' - the militant party of the women's suffrage question," it began. About six months later, a New York Times report said that Paul's screams were heard "resounding through the prison" in London when painful force-feedings were implemented to stop a hunger strike by the suffragettes. Paul mailed another message to her childhood home in Mount Laurel and addressed it to her mother, Tacie: "I am sorry thee was so worried..
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NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
March 28, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
PARIS - After Brussels, President Obama's strategy of gradually degrading ISIS looks terribly risky. And much too slow. Yes, ISIS has lost around 40 percent of the territory it seized in Syria and Iraq, much of it retaken by Kurdish forces with U.S. air support. But it still holds the cities at the heart of its so-called Islamic State: Raqqa in eastern Syria and the major urban area of Mosul in northern Iraq. Right now, it appears unlikely that either will be liberated anytime soon.
NEWS
March 24, 2016
Leave it to Donald Trump to express absolutely the wrong view on the terrorist attacks that left at least 30 people dead and more than 200 injured in Belgium Tuesday. "Brussels was a beautiful city, a beautiful place with zero crime. And now it's a disaster city. It's a total disaster," Trump said. "And we have to be very careful in the United States, we have to be very careful and very vigilant as to who we allow in the country. " The Republican presidential candidate seems intent on making America's open society as closed as the European nations that have become breeding grounds for the terrorist acts being committed by disconnected, disaffected immigrants.
NEWS
March 20, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
In June 1909, Alice Paul sent a letter to her mother from London. "Dear Mamma. . . I have joined the 'suffragettes' - the militant party of the women's suffrage question," it began. About six months later, a New York Times report said that Paul's screams were heard "resounding through the prison" in London when painful force-feedings were implemented to stop a hunger strike by the suffragettes. Paul mailed another message to her childhood home in Mount Laurel and addressed it to her mother, Tacie: "I am sorry thee was so worried..
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
University City, that artificially created place on the west bank of the Schuylkill, has suddenly become Philadelphia's most vital neighborhood. You can see it in the luxury high-rises, office towers, and dorms now coalescing into a glittering second skyline. Just last week, Penn and Drexel held a party to celebrate their economic contribution to the city, which is indeed substantial. Today, Penn reigns supreme as Philadelphia's largest private employer, with nearly 16,000 full-timers on its payroll.
NEWS
August 18, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Civil rights activist Julian Bond, who died Saturday, was born in Tennessee but moved to Pennsylvania as a boy. In 1945, his father, Horace Mann Bond, became the first African American president of Lincoln University in Chester County, according to the university website. The elder Bond served Lincoln, his alma mater, until 1957. Julian Bond graduated in 1957 from George School, a private Quaker high school near Newtown, Bucks County. "We were shocked and saddened to hear of Julian's death," said George head of school Nancy Starmer.
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
If you were looking for an Egyptian who could help his country fulfill the lost promise of the Arab Spring - some day - you couldn't do better than Emad Shahin, an internationally renowned and liberal scholar who studies political Islam. So why was this mild-mannered academic sentenced to death in absentia Saturday in a Cairo court? The answer lays bare the misguided policies of Egypt's new autocratic government, led by President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, which is trying to muzzle all domestic critics in the name of fighting terrorism.
SPORTS
January 16, 2015 | The Inquirer Staff
Marcus Paige scored 23 points and No. 15 North Carolina barely held off a late comeback to beat rival North Carolina State, 81-79, on Wednesday night in Raleigh. Kennedy Meeks added 15 points and 10 rebounds for the Tar Heels (13-4, 3-1 Atlantic Coast Conference). They led by 12 in the second half and by double figures near the four-minute mark before watching N.C. State (12-6, 3-2) twice claw within a point in the final seconds. American 62, Lehigh 59 - Pee Wee Gardner stroked in a three-pointer with 0.8 seconds left to lift American University (10-7, 3-2 Patriot League)
SPORTS
November 16, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple expects to be improved from last year's 9-22 team, but coach Fran Dunphy's Owls will certainly need time to find their form, especially at the offensive end. Defensively, they were in form in their opener, and survived a rough shooting night to defeat American University, 40-37, Friday at the Liacouras Center. It's the fewest points Temple scored in a win since a 38-37 victory over Penn State on Feb. 8, 1947. "I feel very fortunate," said Dunphy, whose team shot 11 for 48 from the field.
NEWS
October 31, 2014
THIS YEAR, I'm celebrating 23 years of marriage. In addition to the joy of being wed to my best friend, our relationship has economically lifted my life and that of my nuclear and extended family. Being married has netted results that neither of us could have dreamed of coming from low-income households. And so I readily embrace the findings of a new report that makes the case that the retreat from marriage - especially among lower-income Americans, and the resulting change in family structures - is a major factor contributing to the economic inequality in the U.S. It may seem old-fashioned, but marriage matters.
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