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NEWS
June 12, 2016
* HELL ON WHEELS and THE AMERICAN WEST. 9 and 10 p.m. Saturday, AMC. Westward ho! AMC is pairing the final seven episodes of its drama about the transcontinental railroad with an event series from Robert Redford about such Western figures as Jesse James, Wyatt Earp, and Billy the Kid. * THE 70TH ANNUAL TONY AWARDS. 8 p.m. Sunday, CBS3. Can't get tickets to Hamilton , either? We at least have a rooting interest in this year's Tonys, hosted by James Corden. Among Hamilton's 16 nominations is one for Philly's Leslie Odom Jr. (pictured)
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | Historical Society of Pennsylvania
With the recent 100th anniversary of the birth of preservationist Jane Jacobs, consider the history of one of the city's most iconic neighborhoods: Chinatown. Philadelphia is connected to one of the earliest instances of Sino-American relations. The 1784 journey of the ginseng-laden Empress of China to Canton (present-day Guangzhou) - the United States' first successful voyage to insular imperial China - was financed primarily by Philadelphian Robert Morris. The beginning of the city's Chinatown is often traced to the early 1870s, with the opening of Lee Fong's laundry on Race Street's 900 block.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
Chadds Ford painter N.C. Wyeth liked to call it the "Great West. " America's western frontier presented a vast and rich canvas for the Chester County artist. In 1903, Wyeth's first illustration of a bucking bronco and rider appeared on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post. He soon gained national recognition as an artist who could convey the rugged charm of the American West. And beginning this Saturday, the Brandywine River Museum will feature some of Wyeth's best western illustrations in the "N.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
It's always a treat to learn about a new artist, especially one who has been "lost" for a long time. Charles James Theriat (1860-1937), an American who lived most of his life in France, turns up in a small exhibition at Schwarz Gallery as a "forgotten Orientalist. " In the 19th century, Orientalists were artists, mostly French, who were drawn to Middle Eastern and North African subjects, then considered exotic. Henri Matisse went through an Orientalist phase early in this century.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
William H. Goetzmann, 80, who in a Pulitzer Prize-winning book overturned the idea of Western exploration in the 19th century as a series of random thrusts into the hinterland, finding instead that it was a far more systematic effort, died last Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Austin, Texas. Mr. Goetzmann's Exploration and Empire: The Explorer and the Scientist in the Winning of the American West synthesized a vast repository of diaries, reports, monographs, and scholarly studies in presenting a comprehensive picture of what he called the American government's "programmed" information-gathering.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | By Neil Scheinin, Special to The Inquirer
Some keen-eyed individuals made their way through the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Robert Adams retrospective one recent morning. Barbara Feeney and her friend Marilyn Smith, for instance, who thought that one of Adams' photographs was particularly intriguing. Visitors to Philadelphia, the Newburyport, Mass., residents nearly bumped heads as they peered at Dead Shrub in a Landfill, a close-up of a very scraggly, very dead plant. "The pulled-up shrub looks like a person's heart that's been ripped out and cast aside," said Feeney.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
German-Americans, says H. Richard Dietrich Jr., hold "a belief in sharing. " It's a trait reflected in his family's generous offerings of Early American painting and furniture to museums and galleries around the country. Part of the family's large collection is on display this month at the Woodmere Art Museum in Chestnut Hill. The offerings from the Chester Springs- based Dietrich American Foundation include 19th-century painting, drawings and hand-colored lithographs from the American West as well as fraktur from Eastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
Philip Fradkin, 77, whose 13 books often focused on the legacy of environmental destruction in the West and who took aim at what he viewed as the simplification of the region by many in the East, died last Sunday at his home in Point Reyes Station, Calif. The cause was cancer, according to his wife, Dianne. Mr. Fradkin grew up in New Jersey and moved to California while in his 20s after becoming enamored of the West during a road trip with his father when he was 14. He went on to explore many major Western themes in his books.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If Muhammad Ali's approach to the boxing ring was to float like a butterfly and sting like a bee, Philadelphia's Jon Barthmus sounds as though he's thinking likewise when it comes to making music. Yet rather than treat his audience to pummels and poetry of insults, Barthmus - as the main man and singing compositional center of Sun Airway - soothes and romances his listeners with an insistent and constant flutter. Two albums of Barthmus' chirruping tones and sparse lyrics - 2010's Nocturne of Exploded Crystal Chandelier and last year's Soft Fall - are as metrical as any Ali rant and doubly melodious to boot.
NEWS
May 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 25 years since its premiere, Sam Shepard's True West has become an American classic, tempting actor after actor with its big ideas, its juicy roles, its macho humor, and its many opportunities to wreck a set. Recently, Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly took it on in New York; John Malkovich and Gary Sinise made a terrific film version. Hunger Theatre's production misses the play's ideas by a mile, but it's pretty good on the set-bashing. Two brothers meet in their mother's kitchen in a suburb of Los Angeles where coyotes lure cocker spaniels away from domestic safety.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 12, 2016
* HELL ON WHEELS and THE AMERICAN WEST. 9 and 10 p.m. Saturday, AMC. Westward ho! AMC is pairing the final seven episodes of its drama about the transcontinental railroad with an event series from Robert Redford about such Western figures as Jesse James, Wyatt Earp, and Billy the Kid. * THE 70TH ANNUAL TONY AWARDS. 8 p.m. Sunday, CBS3. Can't get tickets to Hamilton , either? We at least have a rooting interest in this year's Tonys, hosted by James Corden. Among Hamilton's 16 nominations is one for Philly's Leslie Odom Jr. (pictured)
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | Historical Society of Pennsylvania
With the recent 100th anniversary of the birth of preservationist Jane Jacobs, consider the history of one of the city's most iconic neighborhoods: Chinatown. Philadelphia is connected to one of the earliest instances of Sino-American relations. The 1784 journey of the ginseng-laden Empress of China to Canton (present-day Guangzhou) - the United States' first successful voyage to insular imperial China - was financed primarily by Philadelphian Robert Morris. The beginning of the city's Chinatown is often traced to the early 1870s, with the opening of Lee Fong's laundry on Race Street's 900 block.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Sam Shepard's terrific play True West is exactly the kind of show Theatre Exile is good at: funny and dangerous and profound. So it is surprising that this new production seems so tame and falls so flat. The central characters are brothers. As the play opens, they are meeting for the first time in five years. Lee (Brian Osborne) is a nasty drifter, an outcast, a hustler who has been living in the Mojave Desert. Austin (Jeb Kreager) is a respectable screenwriter, married with children, working on a script about love.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Many an elected official has left behind a mess. But longtime Harrisburg Mayor Stephen Reed provides a rare case in which the mess is not figurative. No, Reed's mess is a real mess - a corporeal, chaotic conglomeration like the one you might find in your kid's room or your dad's garage, only more so. It encompasses a stuffed bison, eight tomahawks, a box of vintage ladies' undergarments, and much, much more. It takes means and ends to make such a mess. Reed's ends were nothing less, and nothing less unlikely, than a museum of the American West in one of the first 13 colonies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If Muhammad Ali's approach to the boxing ring was to float like a butterfly and sting like a bee, Philadelphia's Jon Barthmus sounds as though he's thinking likewise when it comes to making music. Yet rather than treat his audience to pummels and poetry of insults, Barthmus - as the main man and singing compositional center of Sun Airway - soothes and romances his listeners with an insistent and constant flutter. Two albums of Barthmus' chirruping tones and sparse lyrics - 2010's Nocturne of Exploded Crystal Chandelier and last year's Soft Fall - are as metrical as any Ali rant and doubly melodious to boot.
NEWS
July 15, 2012
Philip Fradkin, 77, whose 13 books often focused on the legacy of environmental destruction in the West and who took aim at what he viewed as the simplification of the region by many in the East, died last Sunday at his home in Point Reyes Station, Calif. The cause was cancer, according to his wife, Dianne. Mr. Fradkin grew up in New Jersey and moved to California while in his 20s after becoming enamored of the West during a road trip with his father when he was 14. He went on to explore many major Western themes in his books.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
William H. Goetzmann, 80, who in a Pulitzer Prize-winning book overturned the idea of Western exploration in the 19th century as a series of random thrusts into the hinterland, finding instead that it was a far more systematic effort, died last Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Austin, Texas. Mr. Goetzmann's Exploration and Empire: The Explorer and the Scientist in the Winning of the American West synthesized a vast repository of diaries, reports, monographs, and scholarly studies in presenting a comprehensive picture of what he called the American government's "programmed" information-gathering.
NEWS
May 15, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
In the 25 years since its premiere, Sam Shepard's True West has become an American classic, tempting actor after actor with its big ideas, its juicy roles, its macho humor, and its many opportunities to wreck a set. Recently, Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C. Reilly took it on in New York; John Malkovich and Gary Sinise made a terrific film version. Hunger Theatre's production misses the play's ideas by a mile, but it's pretty good on the set-bashing. Two brothers meet in their mother's kitchen in a suburb of Los Angeles where coyotes lure cocker spaniels away from domestic safety.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
You know you're attending a performance of The Mikado because that's what it says on the program, but the version of the 19th-century operetta playing at Puttin' on the Ritz Theatre is clearly not the show Gilbert and Sullivan wrote. Because The Mikado - which librettist Gilbert placed in Japan - deals in ethnic stereotypes that many may find offensive, director Art McKenzie has placed the action in a California Gold Rush town, renamed the characters, and liberally rewritten the script.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Zebulon M. Pike, an early 19th-century American soldier who grew up in our region, was an explorer of the American West whose name is linked to one of the country's best-known mountains. As a pathfinder, Pike had considerable shortcomings, but he was a persistent and determined officer. "Little is known about the formative years of young Pike," writes the late Bucks County historian W.W.H. Davis, but it seems likely that he was born in Trenton about 1779 and then was taken by his family to live at Lumberton in Solebury Township, Bucks County.
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