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NEWS
January 26, 2009
THE problem Pennsylvania electricity consumers face is not competitive markets but that competition hasn't been allowed to freely work (op-ed, "Electric Rate Shock"). Because of rate caps, consumers have been shielded from the real cost of electricity for more than a decade. Consumers in states without rate caps have gradually absorbed a proportionate rise in rates from escalating fuel costs over several years. No market or regulatory structure can protect against rising fuel costs in a global energy market.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Exelon Power Team and Waymart Wind Farm L.L.C. said yesterday that they were collaborating on a 50-megawatt, wind-powered electric generating plant in rural Wayne County, about 10 miles southeast of Scranton. The companies said the "wind farm" on Moosic Mountain would be the largest of its kind east of the Mississippi. It will produce enough electricity to power about 20,000 average-size homes, the companies said. The farm will create power from 40 towering wind turbines capable of producing electricity under sustained winds of 8 m.p.h.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Alana Semuels and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
DES MOINES, Iowa - It's an overriding conservative principle: Scale back government interference and let businesses survive or fail on their merits. But standing by that principle may hurt Mitt Romney in Iowa, a hotly contested swing state that could provide a crucial six electoral college votes in November. Romney recently upset many conservatives here by saying he would end a government tax credit that helps subsidize a burgeoning wind industry in the state. Some of them - farmers who earn tens of thousands of dollars a year for having wind turbines on their property - say they won't vote for Romney because of his wind position.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Proposed wind farms off the coast of New Jersey and Delaware took a major step forward yesterday when U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar gave four companies the right to build research towers offshore - the first such leases the agency has issued for the nation's outer continental shelf. The leases will allow the companies to gather crucial data on wind speeds and other meteorological information. Until now, the companies and New Jersey, which has agreed to invest $12 million in three projects, have relied on public data and wind resource experts.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
March 3, 2006 | By Jeff Hurvitz
When you drive to the eastern end of the Atlantic City Expressway at dusk, you see a vast, ever-illuminated skyline of glitzy buildings burning hundreds of thousands of lights. Just to the left are five windmill towers, their austere images slipping slowly into the cloak of night. They form the Jersey-Atlantic Wind Farm, a project of a Wayne company, which has been generating electricity since mid-December. At a time when finding alternatives to traditional energy sources is of utmost importance, this project stands as a symbol of all that's possible.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oil prices are up to $145 a barrel. No, they're down to $55. The roller-coaster ride may be making U.S. drivers happy - or at least saving them some of the extra money they spent going to work and on vacation this summer. But coupled with the credit drought, it's enough to give the alternative-energy industry vertigo. Or worse. At least 10 U.S. ethanol producers reportedly have filed for bankruptcy in recent months, including VeraSun Energy Corp. of Sioux Falls, S.D., a billion-dollar business.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wind-turbine manufacturer Gamesa, a Spanish company with U.S. headquarters in Langhorne, is working with the Department of Energy to transform wind-power technology, making it cheaper and more reliable. Gamesa has sent a turbine to the department's National Renewable Energy Lab in Colorado, where scientists will load it with sensors to verify how much power is produced at certain wind speeds and otherwise check the accuracy of computer models used to design the equipment. With all the instrumentation, one might compare the turbine to a heart patient, except "this is more like an athlete," said Jeroen van Dam, senior engineer at the lab. By better understanding how the turbine works, engineers can design closer to the limits, he said.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tourists used to flock to this desert oasis to gawk at Hollywood celebrities on the golf course. These days they come, just as likely, to gawk at windmills. Thousands of the wind machines, as their builders prefer to call them, dominate the San Gorgonio Pass just west of here, one of the nation's deepest and windiest gorges. Like a crop of giant industrial dandelions, they grew up virtually overnight, fanning the hopes of alternative-energy advocates and sending wealthy Palm Springs residents into fits of apoplexy.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Alana Semuels and Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
DES MOINES, Iowa - It's an overriding conservative principle: Scale back government interference and let businesses survive or fail on their merits. But standing by that principle may hurt Mitt Romney in Iowa, a hotly contested swing state that could provide a crucial six electoral college votes in November. Romney recently upset many conservatives here by saying he would end a government tax credit that helps subsidize a burgeoning wind industry in the state. Some of them - farmers who earn tens of thousands of dollars a year for having wind turbines on their property - say they won't vote for Romney because of his wind position.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wind-turbine manufacturer Gamesa, a Spanish company with U.S. headquarters in Langhorne, is working with the Department of Energy to transform wind-power technology, making it cheaper and more reliable. Gamesa has sent a turbine to the department's National Renewable Energy Lab in Colorado, where scientists will load it with sensors to verify how much power is produced at certain wind speeds and otherwise check the accuracy of computer models used to design the equipment. With all the instrumentation, one might compare the turbine to a heart patient, except "this is more like an athlete," said Jeroen van Dam, senior engineer at the lab. By better understanding how the turbine works, engineers can design closer to the limits, he said.
NEWS
June 24, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Proposed wind farms off the coast of New Jersey and Delaware took a major step forward yesterday when U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar gave four companies the right to build research towers offshore - the first such leases the agency has issued for the nation's outer continental shelf. The leases will allow the companies to gather crucial data on wind speeds and other meteorological information. Until now, the companies and New Jersey, which has agreed to invest $12 million in three projects, have relied on public data and wind resource experts.
NEWS
January 26, 2009
THE problem Pennsylvania electricity consumers face is not competitive markets but that competition hasn't been allowed to freely work (op-ed, "Electric Rate Shock"). Because of rate caps, consumers have been shielded from the real cost of electricity for more than a decade. Consumers in states without rate caps have gradually absorbed a proportionate rise in rates from escalating fuel costs over several years. No market or regulatory structure can protect against rising fuel costs in a global energy market.
NEWS
November 14, 2008 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oil prices are up to $145 a barrel. No, they're down to $55. The roller-coaster ride may be making U.S. drivers happy - or at least saving them some of the extra money they spent going to work and on vacation this summer. But coupled with the credit drought, it's enough to give the alternative-energy industry vertigo. Or worse. At least 10 U.S. ethanol producers reportedly have filed for bankruptcy in recent months, including VeraSun Energy Corp. of Sioux Falls, S.D., a billion-dollar business.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
March 5, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
An established utility, a wind-farm developer, and a consortium of commercial fishermen each have proposed building giant turbine-driven power plants off the Jersey Shore, hoping to demonstrate the viability of the ocean breeze as a clean source of electricity. The three proposals vary widely - locations, for example, are between three and 16 miles off Atlantic or Cape May County - and timelines are iffy. Theoretically, however, within five years 100 spinning turbines could be generating 350 megawatts, enough to power 125,000 homes.
NEWS
March 3, 2006 | By Jeff Hurvitz
When you drive to the eastern end of the Atlantic City Expressway at dusk, you see a vast, ever-illuminated skyline of glitzy buildings burning hundreds of thousands of lights. Just to the left are five windmill towers, their austere images slipping slowly into the cloak of night. They form the Jersey-Atlantic Wind Farm, a project of a Wayne company, which has been generating electricity since mid-December. At a time when finding alternatives to traditional energy sources is of utmost importance, this project stands as a symbol of all that's possible.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2001 | By Akweli Parker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Exelon Power Team and Waymart Wind Farm L.L.C. said yesterday that they were collaborating on a 50-megawatt, wind-powered electric generating plant in rural Wayne County, about 10 miles southeast of Scranton. The companies said the "wind farm" on Moosic Mountain would be the largest of its kind east of the Mississippi. It will produce enough electricity to power about 20,000 average-size homes, the companies said. The farm will create power from 40 towering wind turbines capable of producing electricity under sustained winds of 8 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1986 | By Andrew Cassel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tourists used to flock to this desert oasis to gawk at Hollywood celebrities on the golf course. These days they come, just as likely, to gawk at windmills. Thousands of the wind machines, as their builders prefer to call them, dominate the San Gorgonio Pass just west of here, one of the nation's deepest and windiest gorges. Like a crop of giant industrial dandelions, they grew up virtually overnight, fanning the hopes of alternative-energy advocates and sending wealthy Palm Springs residents into fits of apoplexy.
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