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NEWS
August 22, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Americana will be featured at two sales, one in Reading, the other in the Poconos. The Americana to be offered in Reading, at 9 a.m. Tuesday by Ferraro's Auction Center, consists of elaborate lighting fixtures and parts made by Central Brass Works, a Reading company that has made chandeliers and other fixtures since 1912, including chandeliers for 30th Street Station and John Wanamaker. Some of the items to be sold Tuesday include full-scale theater chandeliers, including the gas-lit main fixture from the State Theater in Harrisburg; an art-deco chandelier; ecclesiastical fixtures, and rare bronze dragon wall sconces.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1991 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
American antiques will highlight the 49th annual Historic Ephrata Antiques Show this weekend, to be held at American Legion Ballroom in the Park, Calico Street in Ephrata. Stoneware, which is very popular now, is expected to be in good supply. The show will also include early-American furniture, Staffordshire pottery, china and glass. Show hours are noon to 9 p.m. today and tomorrow and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $2.25. Parking is free. Phone: 717-733-2576.
LIVING
April 8, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
As it has in the past, Freeman's has timed its spring Americana sale to coincide with - or at least ride the coattails of - the very-high-end Philadelphia Antiques Show. But this year's sale, which will begin at 10 a.m. April 16, will offer roughly 450 lots reflecting Americana's homespun side. Among the goods to be offered are 19th-century wooden barber poles, glass canes, weathervanes, quilts, and primitives. Most are expected to sell for three-figure prices, according to pre-sale estimates in the illustrated color catalog ($30)
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most encompassing collections of Americana will be offered today and tomorrow at a former schoolhouse between Princeton and Lawrenceville, N.J. The collection of more than 1,300 items, including furniture, paintings, toys and quilts, comes from the Nantucket, Mass., residence of Barbara Johnson of Princeton. The goods were brought to Princeton after the Nantucket house was sold by Johnson, who owns the schoolhouse on Route 206. The two-day sale is likely to be the first of several liquidating the estate of her husband, J. Seward Johnson Jr., according to Tony Mento, a representative of Classics Auctions, which is conducting the sale.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Another of the quickly growing body of free-swinging American musical collages was performed last night by Relache in a concert crafted to start the Freedom Week events here. The piece was Alvin Curran's Seven Articles, and from the forces Relache put onstage, it looked as though it would be a holiday cantata. It was, but in the sense that John Cage's Renga and Charles Ives' evocations of America might be cantatas. Unlike Renga, in which special interest groups contend in messy, democratic style, Seven Articles moves through different musical terrain, revealing moments serially that could be heard only in America.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two two-day sales next week will offer bidders more than ample chance to load up on Americana, from decoys to Civil War memorabilia. The decoys will be among items to be offered starting at 4 p.m. Monday by the Conestoga Auction Co. near Lancaster at an estate sale that will continue Tuesday. Among the decoys is an R. Madison Mitchell canvasback drake. (Decoys, when attributable to a known artist, are not likely to end up in bays or marshes as lures for hunters, the way so-called working decoys do. Such display decoys can fetch four-figure prices at auction.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people dispute whether Columbus did, but there's no arguing that you can - through a show called Discover America through Antiques, to be held this weekend at Cedar Crest College in Allentown. The benefit for United Cerebral Palsy of the Lehigh Valley is expected to draw more than 25 dealers, bringing in a variety of furniture, glass objects, Victoriana, toys and more. The show will be held in the school's Lees Hall, Cedar Crest Boulevard. Admission is $3.50. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 to 5 Sunday.
LIVING
April 4, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Americana, both traditional and contemporary, will be highlighted at two major catalog auctions in the next 10 days. Both will delve into the wonders of wood. Freeman's will offer more than 400 lots of traditional American furniture and decorative and folk art beginning at 10 a.m. April 14 at its gallery, 1808 Chestnut St. A folk-art highlight is nine lots of carved shorebirds made about 1900 by the celebrated Tuckerton, N.J., artisan Harry V. Shourds. Among the birds is a rare black-bellied plover, expected to sell for $10,000 to $15,000.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
It seems half the musicians with a good head on their shoulders and a twang in their voice are resisting the tag of "country" or "country rock" these days. Instead, they're answering to the call of "Americana" music, judging that term far more inclusive (both creatively and geographically), more modern and free from country's oft-negative baggage. Today, let's focus in on an Americana subset that actually harkens back to the 1960s pop scene, when jangly, tight-harmonizing hybrids of rock and country were first heating up the charts with hits like the Everly Brothers' "Bird Dog," The Beatles' "I'm a Loser" and The Byrds' rendering of "Mr. Tambourine Man. " If it takes a new coat of paint to market this still-tasty brew, so be it!
NEWS
May 14, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An auction this month stemming from a tragedy has the distinction of being the largest sale that Alderfer Auction Co. has conducted in recent years. Beginning May 23 and lasting for four days at the Alderfer Auction Center in Hatfield, the company will sell more than 3,500 lots of antiques, furnishings and Americana from the estate of the late Edna Hiestand. The sale will wind up with a 386-lot catalogue sale that is half top items from the estate and the other half, items from consigners.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The list of Canadian singer-songwriters making their own brand of heartfelt American roots music (at least early in their careers) starts with Neil Young, Joni Mitchell, Bruce Cockburn, Gordon Lightfoot, and Leonard Cohen. Blank, hilly lands; cussed winds and worse relationships - these artists know such things as well as any Heartland U.S. musician. And so do the Manitoba-based Bros. Landreth, who held court at Chestnut Street's Milkboy on Thursday night. Make no mistake. Their principal singer and songwriter, Joey Landreth, is no Young, Cohen, or Cockburn.
NEWS
November 10, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - Of all the domestic secrets someone might contemplate finding in an upstairs back room deep in Trenton these days, aprons are probably the least sexy. Well, except maybe for the black lace one with a wide slit up the middle. But the aprons displayed in the unexpectedly compelling Trenton City Museum in the meticulously restored Ellarslie Mansion nestled in the transcendently lovely Frederick Law Olmsted-designed Cadwalader Park tell a fetching tale nonetheless. As the saying goes, Trenton makes - and apparently wore aprons while doing it. "The Ties That Bind," a new exhibit at the all-too-overlooked Trenton City Museum makes a case for aprons as markers of an American history as distinctive as the cannons on display nearby.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The title of John Hiatt's 22d album is Terms of My Surrender , a phrase that conjures images of resignation and defeat. In reality, the set is the latest chapter in the esteemed singer-songwriter's recent renaissance, and it's a highlight of new Americana and country releases, of which we offer a sample here. To be sure, Terms of My Surrender (New West ***1/2) is no day at the beach. A sense of mortality courses through most of these blues-based numbers.
NEWS
April 6, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The early-music vocal quartet Anonymous 4 invariably gives beautiful-sounding performances. But has a concert ever smelled as wonderful as Thursday's medieval music program in Longwood Garden's ballroom in Kennett Square? Enchanting scents from the heavily flowered courtyard drifted in like a floral tapestry from the group's album covers come to life. Longwood has been producing first-class pop and classical concerts. This one offered Anonymous 4 in something other than the typical Christmas programs for the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society.
REAL_ESTATE
September 1, 2013 | By Catherine Laughlin, For The Inquirer
He thought finding a house in Cherry Hill, his hometown, would be a cinch. Instead, David Griffith and his wife toured 43 properties back in 1990 before settling on a two-story, gray-sided dwelling on a quiet street. The allure of shopping malls, the close proximity to city nightlife, and the location a stone's throw from family were key to keeping the couple rooted in the township, but price was the top priority. "We weren't going to kill ourselves for the five-bedroom mansion and a soaring cathedral entry," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Buddy Miller and Jim Lauderdale have been friends since 1980, and the Americana songwriters and guitarists have regularly guested on each other's recordings and live shows through the years. But it wasn't until 2012 that the duo - who will perform a Free at Noon concert at World Cafe Live on Friday, and headline the venue that evening - undertook a fully collaborative project. And instead of one, they started with two. In August, The Buddy & Jim Radio Show launched on Sirius XM satellite radio's Outlaw Country channel.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | Freelance
Pop Neil Young & Crazy Horse Americana (Warner Bros. ssfd) Every decade or so, Neil Young still circles back from his various and sundry projects to record with Crazy Horse, the ornery and unkempt-sounding, amped-up outfit with whom he has recorded many of his most revered records, dating back to Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere in 1969. And thank goodness for that. But while Young fans will be thankful to hear him cut loose once again with compadres Billy Talbot, Ralph Molina, and Frank Sampedro, the selection of material on the all-covers Americana is puzzling, to say the least.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Freeman's massive sale Saturday of Americana from a variety of collectors and its equally massive Pennsylvania sale Sunday, dominated by a single collection, are not in themselves flashy events. They are likely to draw the serious collector or student of area history, not the bidder seeking fame by acquiring items such as a dress belonging to pop singer Katy Perry. (Leave that for a new eBay.com/Celebrity site, where you can bid on such items to raise money for the stars' favorite charities.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011 | BY MAE ANDERSON, Associated Press N
EW YORK - The makers of "Captain America: The First Avenger" are in a must-win pre-emptive battle against superhero fatigue. Their not-so-secret weapon? A patriotic-themed marketing campaign complete with fireworks and red, white and blue doughnuts. "Captain America," which opened in theaters Friday, follows a string of action-hero movies this summer that have been successful. So, when promoting the film, Paramount and Marvel Studios weren't taking any chances that moviegoers would write it off as just another superhero flick.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
It's post-holiday album cleanup time, as we acknowledge recent releases and newbies hitting music stores and sites today. BARRY'S THE MAN: If you'd characterize Neil Diamond "a rocker," the same can now be said for Barry Manilow with "15 Minutes" (Stiletto, B) , his first album of original material in a decade. Within the story-telling theme - the 15 minutes of fame and (inevitable) fall from grace of a contemporary musician - we do get treated to several rocking tunes, but, come on - it's Barry (Mr. Middle of the Road)
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