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BUSINESS
April 15, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
In the months leading up to tonight's midnight tax-filing deadline, Americans have been feverishly pouring billions of dollars into Individual Retirement Accounts at a far faster pace than in 1990, according to Money magazine's Small Investor Index. Discount broker Charles Schwab, for example, has opened 17,500 new IRA accounts this year, compared with 12,700 for the same period a year ago. At Fidelity Investments, investors with existing IRAs have added 15 percent more cash to their accounts than they did a year ago. Analysts give two reasons for the heightened interest in IRAs.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | Associated Press
LONDON - The last group in England with this many records was The Beatles. Carmelo Anthony and the U.S. men's Olympic basketball team rewrote the record books Thursday in a 156-73 romp over Nigeria, an epic blowout that answered the Americans' detractors after two opening routs that provoked criticism of their slow starts and outside shooting. They led by 26 in the first quarter; had an Olympic-record 78 points in the first half; and Anthony scored 37 points, including a 10-of-12 three-point shooting night, to break the U.S. single-game scoring record in less than three quarters.
NEWS
February 9, 2010
I AM an American. I am neither a Democrat nor Republican, red or blue, left or right. I grew up a rebellious child, I challenged authority and would not stand up to salute the flag in high school. I didn't agree with the way MY country was run. I'm older now, and though I still carry a heavy stone in my stomach at the thought of the way MY country is run, I know it's not America's fault. I love America, and am a proud American. But, like every American, I have my opinions and beliefs that oppose those of others.
NEWS
November 16, 1988 | By RICHARD REEVES
So, Nancy Reagan told the Los Angeles Times that she hasn't talked to her daughter, Patti Davis, for more than a year. What else is new? There is a reason that Americans feel compelled to talk about "family values. " We don't have any - or, rather, we have significantly fewer than almost any other people on Earth. We are the people who left our parents and grandparents behind in Europe to come to the New World. Then we left them behind generation after generation as young men followed Horace Greeley's advice to go West.
NEWS
July 16, 2010
By Leonard Boasberg Rick Santorum was recently quoted as telling the blog The Iowa Republican that President Obama "is detached from the American experience. He just doesn't identify with the average American because of his own background - Indonesia and Hawaii. " The former Republican senator from Pennsylvania went on to say of the president: "His view is from the viewpoint of academics and the halls of the Ivy League schools that he went to, and it's not a love of this country and an understanding of the basic values and wants and desires of its people.
SPORTS
December 16, 1990 | By Roger Allaway, Inquirer Staff Writer
If it didn't know it before, the U.S. national soccer team has found out this year the difference between a "friendly" match and a "competitive" match. The difference is intensity. Learning to deal with an intensity that the Americans don't get from friendly-match opponents is a major consideration as they look toward the 1994 World Cup, which the United States will host. That is why two developments in recent months have been important to the American team. They are the increased movement of top American players to European clubs, where they are playing in professional, competitive situations week in and week out, and the announcement that beginning next year, the CONCACAF regional confederation, of which the United States is a member, will hold a biennial CONCACAF Nations Cup competition.
NEWS
September 15, 2009 | By FATIMAH ALI
WHETHER it's South Carolina GOP Rep. Joe Wilson's angry outburst during President Obama's address to Congress last week, or Serena Williams' ouster from the U.S. Open for cussing out an official or Kanye West's meltdown at the MTV awards, Americans are losing their cool. And although it makes great headlines here, we have a very bad rap internationally. A friend of mine, recently returned from a visit to Asia, was most impressed with the impeccable manners of the people she met there in three different countries.
SPORTS
June 19, 1990 | By Frank Bertucci, Special to the Daily News
They came here with high hopes, but modest expectations. The first U.S. soccer team to play in a World Cup final in 40 years is down to its third, and probably last, game today (TNT, 2:55 p.m. EDT), against Austria in Florence's Stadio Comunale. Mathematically, the Americans still can advance to the second round. But realistically, when Czechoslovakia scored five goals in the game on June 10, the Americans were through for this tournament. Almost as much of a win, most of the players want to gain individual recognition on the international soccer market so they can play in a European professional league next year.
SPORTS
October 20, 2000 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
If it's redemption the Americans are after, they've certainly delivered a conclusive opening statement. This one looks like it's already history, even if it's hardly begun. Where's Yogi Berra when you really need a reason to continue paying attention through the weekend? The fourth Presidents Cup, the PGA Tour's even-yeared answer to the seven-decade tradition of Samuel Ryder, got under way yesterday at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club, 40 miles west of the nation's capitol.
NEWS
March 31, 1988 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
Even though the last U.S. troops withdrew from Vietnam almost 15 years ago, the conflict continues to touch Americans, say two Philadelphia professors. They presented their views to 51 high school history teachers at a March 18 conference on Vietnam at Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill. Michael Zuckerman, chairman of undergraduate history at the University of Pennsylvania, told the teachers that Americans have not been able to forget the war. "There is a continuing presence of Vietnam in today's society," he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 19, 2016
Return of remains is long overdue The removal of American Indian children from their families beginning in 1879 is a dark and truly evil chapter in our history ("On Indians' land, Army hears plea for remains," May 11). As I read about relatives of the chidren asking for their remains to be returned to their homes, I became heartbroken and outraged. These children lost everything - their families, their culture, their religion, their rightful heritage, and finally their lives at the hands of the ignorant and brutal white authorities at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
In a vote that could greatly complicate relations with a key Middle East ally, the Senate on Tuesday voted unanimously to expand the ability of U.S. citizens to sue the government of Saudi Arabia for its alleged role in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The bill, sponsored by Sens. Charles Schumer (D., N.Y.) and John Cornyn (R., Texas), clarifies that foreign governments can be sued for supporting terrorism acts even when they occur outside the United States. Dozens of insurers and thousands of victims and families are suing Saudi Arabia for its alleged role in the attacks, alleging that Saudi government employees helped form a support network for the 9/11 attackers.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
By Susan McCarthy-Miller Long before Donald Trump arrived on the political scene, a two-pronged tempest of gargantuan proportion was gathering power in the form of "tolerable racism. " As President Obama assumed the highest political office in the world, the innermost feelings of our citizenry were slowly being roused by the election of a biracial Hawaiian. These heretofore broad-minded voters were now accessing their deepest racially prejudiced feelings, long tamped down in the name of political correctness, social harmony, and high-minded tolerance.
SPORTS
May 16, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
The nadir of the Phillies' Latin American scouting and development program is easily identifiable. Look back at the 1989 season, and you'll find an opening-day roster that included as many players born in France as the Dominican Republic. When Juan Samuel was traded to the New York Mets later that season, the French population ruled over the Latin one inside the Phillies clubhouse. Vive la France never was a great slogan for a big-league baseball team, and since born-in-Paris shortstop Steve Jeltz was the only French representative, it really would have been a rotten one. Not surprisingly, the Phillies of that era were awful.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
It is that time of year: time to count the fish. The ones traveling hundreds of miles from far-flung ocean waters. The ones heading upstream in search of a suitable space of riverbed (the Black Rock Dam in Phoenixville is always nice this time of year) to meet that special someone and lay a couple of hundred thousand eggs before leaving town. In these next few weeks, the height of the spawning migration season, the job of counting all the fish passing through town falls to Joe Perillo.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
American Airlines, Philadelphia's largest air carrier, reported Tuesday that its April passenger unit revenue was $18 billion, down 0.2 percent compared to April last year. American's planes were 80.4 full, down 1.2 percent from April 2015. Total capacity -- seats and flights -- was up 1.3 percent compared to the period a year ago. The Fort Worth, Tex.-based carrier, which operates 76 percent of the flights at Philadelphia International Airport, said it expects passenger revenue in the current second quarter for each seat mile flown, a key industry measure, to be down 6 percent to 8 percent.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Wharton professor Olivia S. Mitchell sat down to discuss a new idea to help solve the Social Security deficit. In "Will They Take the Money and Work? An Empirical Analysis of People's Willingness to Delay Claiming Social Security Benefits for a Lump Sum," Mitchell and her colleagues argue that lump-sum payouts serve as an incentive to put off collecting Social Security. Here's the difference: Start at 62, get monthly payments the rest of your life. Delay until 67, get a lump sum equal to what you would have collected during those five years and monthly payments thereafter.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Doug Black Jr. clambered up a 14-foot wall, vaulted over hurdles, and leaped off an 11-foot ledge, somersaulting into a pit filled with foam cubes. The gym session, part of his preparation to qualify for the TV show American Ninja Warrior , was hard, sweaty work. Not so long ago, it would have been impossible. The Port Richmond resident suffered from a rare condition that robbed him of his sense of balance, caused severe nausea, and gave him a painfully amped-up sense of hearing, to the point that he could hear his own heartbeat.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania American Water, a subsidiary of American Water of Voorhees, said Thursday that it has signed an agreement to acquire the wastewater assets of the Borough of New Cumberland in Cumberland County for $23 million. The New Cumberland wastewater system serves about 3,100 customers, who already receive water service from Pennsylvania American. The company agreed not to file a rate-increase request before 2018. The sale requires approval from the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission and the state Department of Environmental Protection.
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