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NEWS
January 9, 1986 | By Tom Masland, Inquirer Staff Writer
Disappointed over what they saw as a counterproductive and impractical gesture, Americans working here grappled yesterday with President Reagan's ultimatum - leave or be prosecuted. None seemed in a hurry to decide. Some said they were waiting to see whether the new sanctions against Libya had real teeth and a basis in law. "He's done nothing to touch the (Libyan) oil companies," said a native Philadelphian, a top management aide to a Libyan government oil firm, after reading the Tuesday night announcement.
NEWS
August 17, 1986 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
Europe and England, those enclaves of culture and Old World charm, lost one of their big summer traditions this year: the American tourist. But now the comeback is on. And for Americans currently heading to those time-honored vacation destinations, there is other good news. They're discovering that in many ways, their timing could not be better. Absent the usual summer invasion of Americans, the streets, restaurants and hotels are not nearly as crowded. London and Paris dining spots that last year would have required reservations a month or more in advance now need only a few days' notice, or none at all. Tickets for popular performances are not so difficult to come by. And in some quarters there are discounts, contests and package deals to tantalize tourists.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | Associated Press
CAIRO - An Egyptian court Tuesday sentenced 43 nonprofit workers, including the son of the U.S. secretary of transportation and 15 other Americans, to prison in a case against foreign-funded pro-democracy groups. All of the Americans have left the country. The ruling and jail time of up to five years deepen worries over the operations of nongovernmental organizations in Egypt as parliament considers a bill proposed by President Mohammed Morsi that critics warn will profoundly restrict their activities.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Jonathan Wilson
What better day to become an American citizen than just before the Fourth of July? And what better place than in the nation's first capital? Nearly 1,000 people from 93 countries raised their right hands and pledged allegiance yesterday at Community College of Phila.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Leon Funchess listened closely as the black man in the white coat spoke about how African Americans are especially prone to heart disease and how they can fight it with diet and exercise. Even better: They can aspire to wear a white coat themselves. Funchess, an 11th grader at Masterman High School, was sold. "I see him as a person I want to be," Funchess said. The teenager was listening to Albert Hicks III, a cardiology fellow at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Peter Finn and Ellen Nakashima, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama on Friday defended the government's collection of data on the phone records of millions of Americans, saying that it was a modest encroachment on privacy and one he thinks is both lawful and justified in order to identify terrorists plotting to attack the United States. Obama emphasized that the government does not collect information on individual callers or eavesdrop on Americans' conversations without a warrant. He said he would welcome a debate on the classified surveillance effort as well as the previously secret workings of a second program that gathers the e-mails and other digital content of targeted foreigners outside the United States from major American Internet companies.
SPORTS
July 17, 1987 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, Daily News Sports Writer
By chance or by design, viewers tuning in to the final two rounds of the 116th British Open on Channel 6 (tomorrow from 12 to 2 p.m., Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) might catch only occasional glimpses of Americans. A number of U.S. players who could be touring the links of the hallowed Muirfield course in Scotland, including former British Open champion Bill Rogers, Curtis Strange, Gary Koch, John Mahaffey, Joey Sindelar and Doug Tewell, have elected to skip this year's event.
SPORTS
September 21, 1988 | By Jere Longman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oscar, Oscar. That's all the U.S. Olympic basketball players had heard for weeks, months. Oscar. "We were Oscared to death," coach John Thompson said. Yesterday, the Americans finally got this Oscar business out of their systems with an impressive 102-87 victory over Brazil provided by rapacious defense, rough muscle and withering depth. Oscar Schmidt had singed the Americans for 46 points in Brazil's shocking 120-115 victory in the Pan-American Games in Indianapolis last summer.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | BY JULIO TORRES
A group of state representatives have pooled their talents to introduce a bill that would prohibit state and local governments from providing government forms in any language but English. Since the other language we see on ballots and welfare forms is Spanish, we can be forgiven for assuming that the target of the ban is Spanish. This raises some questions: First, why? Do these legislators feel a strong need to express their patriotism - to assert that they are good Americans?
SPORTS
June 17, 2006 | Daily News Wire Services
They know Claudio Reyna and DaMarcus Beasley and that's about it. The rest of the U.S. World Cup players are mostly no-names to some of their Italian counterparts. "Hopefully," Reyna, the U.S. captain, said yesterday, "they'll remember them after the game. " Trying to stave off elimination, the Americans take the field today in Kaiserslautern, Germany, against the famous Azzurri, a team stocked with many of the sport's richest and splashiest stars. Following their quarterfinal finish 4 years ago, the Americans hoped to become contenders in the world's game.
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