CollectionsAmericans
IN THE NEWS

Americans

NEWS
November 28, 1991
A year ago at this time, our thoughts were consumed with the prospects of a shooting war in the Middle East. Today that war is over and, for many Americans, nearly forgotten. The victory parades of the spring seem a distant memory to a nation now morosely preoccupied with its economic future. Yet on Thanksgiving Day, the first order of business is to give thanks that the worst fears of last winter were not realized. The war was brief and allied casualties were miraculously light.
NEWS
November 28, 2003 | By Dave Montgomery INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
Jimmie and Sue Blackwood, American expatriates from Fort Worth, Texas, always keep a mirror in the trunk of their car. They use it to check the undercarriage for bombs whenever they park outside their wellfortified compound. Jeffery R. Richards, a Boeing representative from Miami, works in his villa as often as possible to avoid potentially risky drives to his office in downtown Riyadh. Lawrence Elkins routinely employs an old axiom from his days as a college football player - "keep your head on a swivel" to look for danger from every direction.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Sean Carlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Less than two months before its former state director squares off against Newark Mayor Cory Booker in the U.S. Senate special election, members of Americans for Prosperity celebrated the opening Tuesday of the group's new field office in Cherry Hill. The conservative nonprofit now has five offices in New Jersey - including another new one in Washington Township - in an effort to expand its influence and voice across the state. "It'll allow us to go out and meet more individuals and carry our message of economic freedom to a larger community and widen our base," said Daryn Iwicki, the nonprofit's deputy state director.
NEWS
November 9, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dave Isay, the creator of StoryCorps, was planning a career in medicine when he first experienced the power of radio. The year was 1988. The place: New York?s East Village, where Isay stumbled upon a bookstore that sold nothing but 12-step guides for addicts in recovery. The store was intriguing, Isay, 41, recalls. But the couple who ran it - recovering drug addicts who envisioned creating a museum of addiction - fascinated him more. Isay persuaded WBAI-FM, a liberal New York community radio station known for its social activism, to let him record the story for broadcast, and thus he began a career of listening in on the conversations of strangers.
NEWS
March 18, 2003
The sun will rise each day this week as it has for years untold. The neighbor will walk the dog. The school bus will rumble by, spring will keep burrowing its way up through the thawing soil. But one day soon, the ordinary will come wrapped in the extraordinary. Routine will be knocked off-balance by a blessedly uncommon fog. President Bush last night told Americans - and the world - that the United States will soon unleash war in Iraq, unless Saddam Hussein and his two sons go into exile by Thursday.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | By Tom Masland, Inquirer Staff Writer
With mixed regret, worry and relief, about 100 American workers and businessmen - who had raced to settle their affairs here - left Libya yesterday to meet President Reagan's deadline for them to get out or face prosecution. The Americans took flights to Malta, Rome, London or Frankfurt to avoid violating tomorrow's deadline for all Libyan-American commercial transactions to cease and all Americans to leave. Although there were no hard figures, it appeared that nearly all of the 1,500 Americans who were believed to be here a month ago now have left, although many said they hoped to return to jobs here that in some cases were being held open temporarily by Libyan companies.
NEWS
July 4, 2002
Most Fourth of Julys are happy. The Declaration of Independence - that rebellious contract signed 226 years ago by the Jefferson gang - has survived faction and riot, revolution and civil strife, depression and world war. A happy thing. But this Fourth is tinged with uncertainty and melancholy. That urges a question: What institutions bless this holiday? Not only church or state, not only anthem or pledge, not just Declaration or Constitution. What else, then? Look around: Millions of people, magnetized by a common festival, rushing all over the country to be together.
NEWS
July 4, 2002 | By Jane Eisner
We'll eat hot dogs and hamburgers on red and blue paper plates with white napkins this afternoon. As night approaches, we'll head to the ball field, where we'll ooh and aah as fireworks fill the sky with mesmerizing explosions of shapes and colors that, I swear, get better every year. There's a pleasant predictability to Independence Day that is as satisfying as a ripe summer peach. Or so it has been. I wonder what will be different today. This is, after all, the first Fourth of July after the 11th of September - the first scheduled celebration of American independence after the latest war, the war on terrorism, has begun.
SPORTS
June 18, 2010 | By KERITH GABRIEL, gabrielk@phillynews.com
It was either the slick pitch of Royal Bakofeng Stadium or the slick gloves of English goalkeeper Robert Green, but as a result of its 1-1 draw to England last Saturday in Rustenburg, renewed confidence has emerged among the Americans. The Stars and Stripes are walking - and talking - tall heading into their second game of FIFA World Cup play today in Johannesburg against Slovenia, an unassuming team that battled Algeria in its opener and emerged with a 1-0 victory, currently sitting atop Group C with three vital points.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
"If I don't get excited about this soccer stuff," Slats said, "does that mean I ain't a good Chicagoan?" This is a unique event for our city and the nation. The World Cup is the biggest sports event on the planet. Billions of soccer-loving foreigners are watching on TV. "So what? All that proves is that most of the world is too poor to build bowling alleys, golf courses, tennis courts or baseball fields. There's hunnerts of millions of people still ain't got indoor plumbing, but that don't mean there's something great about an outhouse.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|