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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016
Bikers for AIDS research What's better than a bevy of celebrities riding hogs into Philadelphia for a good cause? A discount on excellent skincare. Philadelphia is the finish line for the seventh annual Kiehl's LifeRide for amfAR, an AIDS research foundation. The Kiehl's store at the Shops at Liberty Place is the culmination, on Friday, of the 11-day trek that includes such riders as Gilmore Girls ' Scott Patterson and Sex and the City 's Gilles Marini. This means shopping discounts for you: Products in the Kiehl's store are 15 percent off, and Kiehl's will donate the 15 percent difference to amfAR.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Henry Goldman and Alan Sipress contributed to this article
Authorities in Pennsylvania and at least three other states are investigating a Northeast Philadelphia businessman who placed fund-raising canisters in thousands of stores to solicit money that he said would be used for AIDS research. Attorneys general in Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut said they were investigating Jerry Silverman and the fund-raising practices of his company, Lectra Business Products Co. The charity for which Silverman purported to raise money, the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR)
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Larry Copeland
The little yellow "Stop AIDS" can next to the cash register was targeted at the socially compassionate shopper: Drop in a few coins, maybe a dollar bill, and quench that psychic need to do something, however small, about the deadly plague. Last week, though, authorities were investigating whether people who put money in one of thousands of cans like this one were doing less than they thought. Attorneys general in Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut were scrutinizing the fund-raising activities of Jerry Silverman, whose Northeast Philadelphia company, Lectra Products Co., distributed more than 25,000 of the cans in stores along the Eastern seaboard.
LIVING
May 19, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Mathilde Krim, the vibrant leader of the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFar), could have done nothing. She was prominent in medical circles, head of the interferon laboratory at New York's prestigious Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in 1980, when the medical community was baffled by a mysterious new disease that attacked the body's immune system. Krim, who will be in Philadelphia Monday for the star-studded Light Up the Night benefit for AIDS, was also well-known in social circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | By Dan Gross
YOU CAN CATCH model Tyson Beckford and Mark-Paul Gosselaar , who now stars in TNT's "Franklin & Bash," but will forever be known as Zack Morris of "Saved by the Bell," outside Kiehl's (18th & Walnut) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 1. They are just two of the motorcycle riders in Kiehl's LifeRide for amfAR, an AIDS research organization, that begins its ride from the store. Former "Top Chef" contestant Jennifer Carroll, who runs the Ritz-Carlton's 10 Arts by Eric Ripert , will host the event.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER FILM CRITIC
In the land where chefs are superstars, Roger Verge, chef/owner of Moulin de Mougins, was himself starstruck. The heavenly bodies of the movie and music worlds were in rare alignment Thursday night, and the man in the crisp, white chef's jacket stole a moment to stroll through the black-tie bash at his elegant restaurant and savor the spectacle. Elton John was at the piano and Ringo Starr on drums, as Sharon Stone boogied to an impromptu rendition of "Great Balls of Fire. " Meanwhile, an intimate gang of 500 that included the likes of Winona Ryder, Sigourney Weaver, R.E.M.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Attorney General's Office has told the Aztec Club on Delaware Avenue to stop promoting a New Year's Eve event as a benefit for AIDS research. Bob Gentzel, a spokesman for Attorney General Ernie Preate, said yesterday that a nonprofit foundation set up by the Aztec to sponsor the event was not registered as a charity, as required by Pennsylvania law. Of the four AIDS organizations listed as beneficiaries of the event - supposed to feature local and national celebrities at a ticket price of $150 - two have contended that their names were used without their permission and the other two are not listed as charities in Pennsylvania, Gentzel said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's being billed as one of the most spectacular benefits in Philadelphia's history. Certainly, it will be the most spectacular benefit in Philadelphia's history to raise money and consciousness in the fight against AIDS. It's called "Light Up the Night Against AIDS," and it's scheduled for May 23 at the Academy of Music. So far the sponsors have lined up enough stars to light up a Stygian darkness - among them, nine-time Tony Award-winning dancer Tommy Tune, actress and singer Barbara Cook, opera singer Benita Valente, pop singer Phyllis Hyman, actors Michael York and Gary Morris, actresses Beatrice Arthur and Celeste Holm, and TV personality Dick Cavett.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Columnist
Those who love the feeling of a tingly mask followed by a whipped, facial cream treatment don't need an introduction to Kiehl's Since 1851 president Chris Salgardo. They already worship the burly, bearded top executive of the uber-luxury skin care brand with the no-frills labels. The rest of us regularly walk by the stand-alone stores in Rittenhouse Square and the Plaza at King of Prussia oblivious to Kiehl's boutique standing. Today the company, which started as an apothecary in New York's East Village and sells everything from its Creme de Corps line to its lip balm collection, is a fave of tastemakers and celebrities including Halle Berry and Brad Pitt.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Those who love the feeling of a tingly mask followed by a whipped, facial cream treatment don't need an introduction to Kiehl's Since 1851 president Chris Salgardo. They already worship the burly, bearded top executive of the uber-luxury skin care brand with the no-frills labels. The rest of us regularly walk by the stand-alone stores in Rittenhouse Square and the Plaza at King of Prussia oblivious to Kiehl's boutique standing. Today the company, which started as an apothecary in New York's East Village and sells everything from its Creme de Corps line to its lip balm collection, is a fave of tastemakers and celebrities including Halle Berry and Brad Pitt.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016
Bikers for AIDS research What's better than a bevy of celebrities riding hogs into Philadelphia for a good cause? A discount on excellent skincare. Philadelphia is the finish line for the seventh annual Kiehl's LifeRide for amfAR, an AIDS research foundation. The Kiehl's store at the Shops at Liberty Place is the culmination, on Friday, of the 11-day trek that includes such riders as Gilmore Girls ' Scott Patterson and Sex and the City 's Gilles Marini. This means shopping discounts for you: Products in the Kiehl's store are 15 percent off, and Kiehl's will donate the 15 percent difference to amfAR.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Columnist
Those who love the feeling of a tingly mask followed by a whipped, facial cream treatment don't need an introduction to Kiehl's Since 1851 president Chris Salgardo. They already worship the burly, bearded top executive of the uber-luxury skin care brand with the no-frills labels. The rest of us regularly walk by the stand-alone stores in Rittenhouse Square and the Plaza at King of Prussia oblivious to Kiehl's boutique standing. Today the company, which started as an apothecary in New York's East Village and sells everything from its Creme de Corps line to its lip balm collection, is a fave of tastemakers and celebrities including Halle Berry and Brad Pitt.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
Those who love the feeling of a tingly mask followed by a whipped, facial cream treatment don't need an introduction to Kiehl's Since 1851 president Chris Salgardo. They already worship the burly, bearded top executive of the uber-luxury skin care brand with the no-frills labels. The rest of us regularly walk by the stand-alone stores in Rittenhouse Square and the Plaza at King of Prussia oblivious to Kiehl's boutique standing. Today the company, which started as an apothecary in New York's East Village and sells everything from its Creme de Corps line to its lip balm collection, is a fave of tastemakers and celebrities including Halle Berry and Brad Pitt.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2011 | By Dan Gross
YOU CAN CATCH model Tyson Beckford and Mark-Paul Gosselaar , who now stars in TNT's "Franklin & Bash," but will forever be known as Zack Morris of "Saved by the Bell," outside Kiehl's (18th & Walnut) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 1. They are just two of the motorcycle riders in Kiehl's LifeRide for amfAR, an AIDS research organization, that begins its ride from the store. Former "Top Chef" contestant Jennifer Carroll, who runs the Ritz-Carlton's 10 Arts by Eric Ripert , will host the event.
NEWS
May 24, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER FILM CRITIC
In the land where chefs are superstars, Roger Verge, chef/owner of Moulin de Mougins, was himself starstruck. The heavenly bodies of the movie and music worlds were in rare alignment Thursday night, and the man in the crisp, white chef's jacket stole a moment to stroll through the black-tie bash at his elegant restaurant and savor the spectacle. Elton John was at the piano and Ringo Starr on drums, as Sharon Stone boogied to an impromptu rendition of "Great Balls of Fire. " Meanwhile, an intimate gang of 500 that included the likes of Winona Ryder, Sigourney Weaver, R.E.M.
LIVING
May 19, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Mathilde Krim, the vibrant leader of the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFar), could have done nothing. She was prominent in medical circles, head of the interferon laboratory at New York's prestigious Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in 1980, when the medical community was baffled by a mysterious new disease that attacked the body's immune system. Krim, who will be in Philadelphia Monday for the star-studded Light Up the Night benefit for AIDS, was also well-known in social circles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's being billed as one of the most spectacular benefits in Philadelphia's history. Certainly, it will be the most spectacular benefit in Philadelphia's history to raise money and consciousness in the fight against AIDS. It's called "Light Up the Night Against AIDS," and it's scheduled for May 23 at the Academy of Music. So far the sponsors have lined up enough stars to light up a Stygian darkness - among them, nine-time Tony Award-winning dancer Tommy Tune, actress and singer Barbara Cook, opera singer Benita Valente, pop singer Phyllis Hyman, actors Michael York and Gary Morris, actresses Beatrice Arthur and Celeste Holm, and TV personality Dick Cavett.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The state Attorney General's Office has told the Aztec Club on Delaware Avenue to stop promoting a New Year's Eve event as a benefit for AIDS research. Bob Gentzel, a spokesman for Attorney General Ernie Preate, said yesterday that a nonprofit foundation set up by the Aztec to sponsor the event was not registered as a charity, as required by Pennsylvania law. Of the four AIDS organizations listed as beneficiaries of the event - supposed to feature local and national celebrities at a ticket price of $150 - two have contended that their names were used without their permission and the other two are not listed as charities in Pennsylvania, Gentzel said.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | By Larry Copeland
The little yellow "Stop AIDS" can next to the cash register was targeted at the socially compassionate shopper: Drop in a few coins, maybe a dollar bill, and quench that psychic need to do something, however small, about the deadly plague. Last week, though, authorities were investigating whether people who put money in one of thousands of cans like this one were doing less than they thought. Attorneys general in Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut were scrutinizing the fund-raising activities of Jerry Silverman, whose Northeast Philadelphia company, Lectra Products Co., distributed more than 25,000 of the cans in stores along the Eastern seaboard.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Henry Goldman and Alan Sipress contributed to this article
Authorities in Pennsylvania and at least three other states are investigating a Northeast Philadelphia businessman who placed fund-raising canisters in thousands of stores to solicit money that he said would be used for AIDS research. Attorneys general in Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut said they were investigating Jerry Silverman and the fund-raising practices of his company, Lectra Business Products Co. The charity for which Silverman purported to raise money, the American Foundation for AIDS Research (AmFAR)
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