CollectionsAmgen
IN THE NEWS

Amgen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Wires / AP
George Rathmann, 84, who as founding CEO took Amgen Inc. from a small company with an unclear mission in a strange new field and helped turn it into the world's largest biotech drugmaker, died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, Calif., announced Mr. Rathmann's death Monday in a statement. Convinced in the 1970s that gene splicing would become hugely important, Mr. Rathmann set out to make it so. As chief executive officer of Amgen from 1980 to 1988, he developed two blockbuster drugs that made the company's name and have remained its best sellers: Epogen for anemia and Neupogen for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
California-based drugmaker Amgen has agreed to pay $71 million to 48 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, and the District of Columbia, to settle allegations that it violated consumer protection laws with misleading promotion of the anemia drug Aranesp and the plaque psoriasis drug Enbrel. Pennsylvania is likely to get about $2.4 million of the total, accoring to the Attorney General's Office. The New Jersey Attorney General's Office said that state would get about $1.57 million.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wyeth said yesterday that its profit jumped 47 percent in the first quarter, after sale of its stake in Amgen Inc. But the drugmaker reported that sales of its female hormone-replacement drugs plunged by 40 percent. Wyeth, which is based in Madison, N.J., and employs 4,900 in the Philadelphia area, reported first-quarter earnings of $1.28 billion, or 96 cents a share, compared with $872 million, or 65 cents a share, in the same quarter a year ago. Profit was boosted by a onetime gain of $558.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Greg Stohr, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Two class-action disputes divided the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as companies looked to build on the victory won last year when the justices threw out a nationwide sex-bias suit against Wal-Mart Stores Inc. The court's Republican-appointed majority questioned separate efforts to press an antitrust suit against Comcast Corp., the nation's largest cable-television company, and a securities-fraud case targeting Amgen Inc., the world's...
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Raising the hope of a leaner future for an ever-fatter America, scientists have gotten genetically obese mice to drop one-third of their weight in just two weeks by injecting them with a newly discovered hormone that regulates body fat. Working independently at three research centers, the scientists found that the daily injections suppressed the animals' appetites, sped up their metabolisms, and burned off so much body fat that they slimmed down...
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Drew Armstrong, Bloomberg News
President Obama's deficit-trimming proposal released Monday would chop $320 billion from U.S. health programs by cutting spending on prescription drugs and nursing homes and by increasing individuals' payments for Medicare coverage. The biggest reduction - $135 billion - would be in the drug prices the government pays companies such as Pfizer Inc. and Merck & Co. for low-income beneficiaries. "We will reform Medicare and Medicaid, but we will not abandon the fundamental commitment that this country has kept for generations," Obama said.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five major pharmaceutical companies, including GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., have disclosed recently that a few of the prescription medicines carrying their labels were fake, watered down, or had experienced tampering. No patients are known to have been injured, the companies said. They have written letters to patients, doctors and pharmacists to alert them. The Food and Drug Administration is investigating the cases reported by Glaxo, Eli Lilly & Co., Bayer Corp., Amgen Inc. and Serono Inc. "It's too soon to know whether the recent cases amount to a new trend," FDA spokesman Jason Brodsky said.
NEWS
January 2, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
Although Claralee M. O'Leary of Valley Forge switched careers 15 years ago from teaching to gemology, she still hasn't forsaken her teaching skills. "I like to teach my sales associates what I know. I find I'm still a teacher at heart," said O'Leary, manager for six years of the J.E. Caldwell Co. jewelry store in Haverford, which has 10 employees. O'Leary was awarded the title of registered jeweler by the American Gem Society this year, a designation held by only 1,300 jewelers across the United States and Canada.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alzheimer's disease researchers are trying to gauge the potential of a breakthrough announced Friday: the discovery of an enzyme implicated in the disease. Amgen Inc., a biotechnology company in Thousand Oaks, Calif., announced that the discovery of the beta-secretase enzyme could - perhaps in a decade - lead to drugs that block the enzyme. The company said it was too early to tell whether such drugs would be able to cure or prevent Alzheimer's disease. Almost simultaneously, SmithKline Beecham, a pharmaceutical company with U.S. headquarters in Philadelphia, was expected to announce its finding of the same enzyme at the annual Society of Neuroscience meeting, which started yesterday in Miami Beach, Fla. Scientists are not sure whether the enzyme causes Alzheimer's, so they do not know whether blocking the enzyme would cure the disease.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So what is biotechnology? At the BIO 2005 convention this week, the answer depended on whom you asked. "God, I don't know. Nobody has ever asked me before. It's hard to define," said Stephen L. Minger, director of the stem-cell laboratory at King's College London, which he said was the largest medical school in Europe. From his medical perspective, he added, it would be technology that helps researchers "interfere with the behavior of aberrant cells and promote improved behavior.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
California-based drugmaker Amgen has agreed to pay $71 million to 48 states, including Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware, and the District of Columbia, to settle allegations that it violated consumer protection laws with misleading promotion of the anemia drug Aranesp and the plaque psoriasis drug Enbrel. Pennsylvania is likely to get about $2.4 million of the total, accoring to the Attorney General's Office. The New Jersey Attorney General's Office said that state would get about $1.57 million.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2012 | By Greg Stohr, Bloomberg News
WASHINGTON - Two class-action disputes divided the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday as companies looked to build on the victory won last year when the justices threw out a nationwide sex-bias suit against Wal-Mart Stores Inc. The court's Republican-appointed majority questioned separate efforts to press an antitrust suit against Comcast Corp., the nation's largest cable-television company, and a securities-fraud case targeting Amgen Inc., the world's...
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | Wires / AP
George Rathmann, 84, who as founding CEO took Amgen Inc. from a small company with an unclear mission in a strange new field and helped turn it into the world's largest biotech drugmaker, died Sunday of complications from pneumonia at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, Calif., announced Mr. Rathmann's death Monday in a statement. Convinced in the 1970s that gene splicing would become hugely important, Mr. Rathmann set out to make it so. As chief executive officer of Amgen from 1980 to 1988, he developed two blockbuster drugs that made the company's name and have remained its best sellers: Epogen for anemia and Neupogen for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By Drew Armstrong, Bloomberg News
President Obama's deficit-trimming proposal released Monday would chop $320 billion from U.S. health programs by cutting spending on prescription drugs and nursing homes and by increasing individuals' payments for Medicare coverage. The biggest reduction - $135 billion - would be in the drug prices the government pays companies such as Pfizer Inc. and Merck & Co. for low-income beneficiaries. "We will reform Medicare and Medicaid, but we will not abandon the fundamental commitment that this country has kept for generations," Obama said.
NEWS
November 19, 2007 | By Lee H. Walker
Have you heard that federal regulators want to cut back on the amount the government will pay for certain drugs for cancer patients and people on kidney dialysis? Any changes in how the government regulates health-care assistance should be of particular concern to the black community, since blacks disproportionately rely on federal programs such as Medicare to pay for their prescription drugs. Blacks, for example, make up about 13 percent of the general population but make up nearly 40 percent of dialysis patients.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wyeth said yesterday that its third-quarter sales rose, but that its net income fell 1 percent thanks largely to increasing costs and a plant closing in Rhode Island overseen by one of its partners, Amgen Inc. Net income was $1.15 billion, or 84 cents a share, compared with $1.16 billion, or 85 cents a share, for the third quarter of 2006. Operating results were slightly better. Excluding onetime charges, net income for the third quarter was $1.23 billion, or 90 cents a share, compared with $1.14 billion, or 84 cents a share, for the same quarter of 2006.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2005 | By Porus P. Cooper INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So what is biotechnology? At the BIO 2005 convention this week, the answer depended on whom you asked. "God, I don't know. Nobody has ever asked me before. It's hard to define," said Stephen L. Minger, director of the stem-cell laboratory at King's College London, which he said was the largest medical school in Europe. From his medical perspective, he added, it would be technology that helps researchers "interfere with the behavior of aberrant cells and promote improved behavior.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wyeth said yesterday that its profit jumped 47 percent in the first quarter, after sale of its stake in Amgen Inc. But the drugmaker reported that sales of its female hormone-replacement drugs plunged by 40 percent. Wyeth, which is based in Madison, N.J., and employs 4,900 in the Philadelphia area, reported first-quarter earnings of $1.28 billion, or 96 cents a share, compared with $872 million, or 65 cents a share, in the same quarter a year ago. Profit was boosted by a onetime gain of $558.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wyeth said yesterday that its profit nearly doubled in the fourth quarter, after selling its stake in Amgen Inc. and cutting about 400 jobs in the Philadelphia region - and 3,150 worldwide. Since layoffs began in mid-November at the company, based in Madison, N.J., the drugmaker has reduced its workforce here from 5,300 to about 4,900 in four locations - Radnor, Collegeville, Great Valley and King of Prussia - said Wyeth spokesman Doug Petkus. Wyeth has also eliminated about 800 to 900 jobs at its manufacturing plant in Marietta, Lancaster County, Petkus said.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2002 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Five major pharmaceutical companies, including GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., have disclosed recently that a few of the prescription medicines carrying their labels were fake, watered down, or had experienced tampering. No patients are known to have been injured, the companies said. They have written letters to patients, doctors and pharmacists to alert them. The Food and Drug Administration is investigating the cases reported by Glaxo, Eli Lilly & Co., Bayer Corp., Amgen Inc. and Serono Inc. "It's too soon to know whether the recent cases amount to a new trend," FDA spokesman Jason Brodsky said.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|