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SPORTS
March 22, 2008 | By Gene Marrano FOR THE INQUIRER
Amherst, the defending NCAA Division III men's basketball champion, proved too much for Ursinus in its first Final Four appearance since 1981. The Lord Jeffs pummeled the Bears, 84-58, in a semifinal yesterday at the Salem Civic Center, ending their winning streak at 23 games. Amherst (27-3), ranked third in the country by D3Hoops.com, will play Washington-St. Louis (24-6) for the championship at 4 p.m. today after Ursinus faces Hope (27-4) in the consolation game at 1:30.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | By Christopher B. Daly, Washington Post Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
A man who burned himself to death on the Amherst town common in an apparent protest against the Persian Gulf war was identified yesterday as Gregory D. Levey, 30, a substitute teacher. Authorities said Levey acted alone when he doused himself with two gallons of paint thinner and set himself ablaze Monday afternoon in a protest that horrified onlookers in the center of Amherst, a university town of about 35,000 residents about 75 miles west of Boston. Levey was the son of Robert Levey, Boston Globe restaurant critic, and the stepson of Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Globe.
SPORTS
March 21, 2008 | By John Kopp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took 27 years and two clutch free throws, but Ursinus finally will return to the Division III men's basketball Final Four tonight in Salem, Va. The 16th-seeded Bears (29-2) will face Amherst (Mass.), the defending national champion, at 5 p.m. in the Salem Civic Center. The Lord Jeffs are playing in their third straight Final Four. Nick Shattuck leads the Bears with 22.3 points per game and averages 6.5 rebounds. John Noonan and Matt Hilton of the Collegeville team also average double figures, at 15.1 and 12.4 ppg., respectively.
SPORTS
March 23, 2008 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ursinus finished fourth in the Division III men's basketball tournament, losing yesterday's consolation game to Hope College, 100-86. John Noonan scored 24 points for the Bears (29-4), who were in the Final Four for the first time since 1981. Washington-St. Louis (25-6) won its first NCAA title with a 90-68 win over defending champion Amherst (27-4).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For the last 20 years or so of her life, before her death in 1886 at the age of 55, Emily Dickinson didn't leave her family's house in Amherst, Mass. One of America's greatest poets, she is also one of its most famous recluses. In The Belle of Amherst at Hedgerow Theatre, playwright William Luce and actress Penelope Reed artfully combine these two aspects of Emily Dickinson into a comprehensible whole. The Dickinson that Luce creates and Reed presents comes vividly to life. There is no way of knowing, of course, whether Emily Dickinson, about whom not very much is known, was really like the Luce-Reed version, but the woman on the Hedgerow stage is a credible, engaging character, and the audience certainly gets to know and understand her better than the townspeople of Amherst did the real Emily.
NEWS
July 9, 1987 | By Garth Garrett, Special to The Inquirer
When Penelope Reed takes the stage tomorrow night at Neumann College in Aston, her performance as Emily Dickinson in The Belle of Amherst will be more than just a benefit for Hedgerow Theater's rebuilding effort. It will be a return to her roots. "Jasper Deeter was my first teacher," Reed recalled in a warm, clear voice that resonated with awe as she talked about Hedgerow's legendary founder. Deeter started the company in 1923 and was one of its driving forces until he retired in 1956.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It is ironic that Emily Dickinson, perhaps the most celebrated recluse in Western literature, should turn out to be one of the most visible characters in contemporary American theater. That's what the great poet, who rarely strayed beyond the boundaries of her garden in the last decades of her life, has become, thanks to the enduring popularity of William Luce's 1976 play The Belle of Amherst. Dickinson's latest local theatrical incarnation is in a new theater in Ambler where, performed by Ceal Phelan, the one-woman play is closing the initial, three-production season of the Act II Playhouse.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Melissa Ketunuti was upbeat, positive, and incredibly smart - the kind of medical student a professor who has taught hundreds of young people still recalls vividly years after her graduation. That's the assessment of Robert Siegel, a former Stanford Medical School professor of Ketunuti, the 35-year-old pediatrician and researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who was found strangled, bound, and set on fire Monday in her Naudain Street home. Jason Smith, a 36-year-old Levittown exterminator, was charged Thursday with Ketunuti's death.
SPORTS
January 25, 2001 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Most coaches of 2-13 basketball teams would rather be inconspicuous. Swarthmore's Lee Wimberly isn't one of these recluses. Wimberly stood up at Tuesday's Small College Basketball Coaches Association luncheon and proclaimed, "We are probably the best 2-13 team in the United States. " After last night's 65-51 win over Haverford, Swarthmore is perhaps the best 3-13 team in the nation. With three freshmen and two sophomores as its top five scorers, Swarthmore has lost three games in overtime and a couple at the buzzer.
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NEWS
December 7, 2013 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
This September, when a local blogger mapped the 30.61-mile route Sylvester Stallone would have taken to complete Rocky 2 's geographically improbable running montage, most readers took it as the ultimate punch line to a long-running cinephiles' joke. Rebecca Schaefer, however, took it as a challenge. The 25-year-old Center City resident quickly put up a website and organized what's known, in ultra-distance-running circles, as a "fatass" run. About 350 people have indicated on Facebook that they plan to join the Rocky 50K (that's not an extra zero)
NEWS
January 26, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melissa Ketunuti was upbeat, positive, and incredibly smart - the kind of medical student a professor who has taught hundreds of young people still recalls vividly years after her graduation. That's the assessment of Robert Siegel, a former Stanford Medical School professor of Ketunuti, the 35-year-old pediatrician and researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia who was found strangled, bound, and set on fire Monday in her Naudain Street home. Jason Smith, a 36-year-old Levittown exterminator, was charged Thursday with Ketunuti's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2011 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
A friend, upon hearing that The Belle of Amherst was in production at Rose Valley's Hedgerow Theatre, commented, "That thing is going to play until there's nothing left on Earth but Cher doing it for an audience of cockroaches. " That's a fairly accurate portrait of our species - Cher representing our pathological need for attention and poet Emily Dickinson the quiet delights of privacy. And even if Penelope Reed, Hedgerow's artistic director and poet channeler, doesn't have half Cher's half-life, her longevity in the title role gives her a serious claim on that postapocalyptic lead.
SPORTS
March 23, 2008 | BY THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ursinus finished fourth in the Division III men's basketball tournament, losing yesterday's consolation game to Hope College, 100-86. John Noonan scored 24 points for the Bears (29-4), who were in the Final Four for the first time since 1981. Washington-St. Louis (25-6) won its first NCAA title with a 90-68 win over defending champion Amherst (27-4).
SPORTS
March 22, 2008 | By Gene Marrano FOR THE INQUIRER
Amherst, the defending NCAA Division III men's basketball champion, proved too much for Ursinus in its first Final Four appearance since 1981. The Lord Jeffs pummeled the Bears, 84-58, in a semifinal yesterday at the Salem Civic Center, ending their winning streak at 23 games. Amherst (27-3), ranked third in the country by D3Hoops.com, will play Washington-St. Louis (24-6) for the championship at 4 p.m. today after Ursinus faces Hope (27-4) in the consolation game at 1:30.
SPORTS
March 22, 2008 | By JEFF GILBERT For the Daily News
Ursinus basketball coach Kevin Small puts a lot of emphasis on scouting reports, and that work helped produce 29 victories and a 23-game winning streak this season. But after defending Division III champion Amherst dominated the Bears, 84-58, in the national semifinals last night at the Salem Civic Center, Small wished he had prepared differently for the Lord Jeffs. "In retrospect, we probably would have been better served playing to our own strengths vs. trying to counter some of the things Amherst does so well," Small said.
SPORTS
March 21, 2008 | By John Kopp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took 27 years and two clutch free throws, but Ursinus finally will return to the Division III men's basketball Final Four tonight in Salem, Va. The 16th-seeded Bears (29-2) will face Amherst (Mass.), the defending national champion, at 5 p.m. in the Salem Civic Center. The Lord Jeffs are playing in their third straight Final Four. Nick Shattuck leads the Bears with 22.3 points per game and averages 6.5 rebounds. John Noonan and Matt Hilton of the Collegeville team also average double figures, at 15.1 and 12.4 ppg., respectively.
SPORTS
January 25, 2001 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
Most coaches of 2-13 basketball teams would rather be inconspicuous. Swarthmore's Lee Wimberly isn't one of these recluses. Wimberly stood up at Tuesday's Small College Basketball Coaches Association luncheon and proclaimed, "We are probably the best 2-13 team in the United States. " After last night's 65-51 win over Haverford, Swarthmore is perhaps the best 3-13 team in the nation. With three freshmen and two sophomores as its top five scorers, Swarthmore has lost three games in overtime and a couple at the buzzer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1999 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
It is ironic that Emily Dickinson, perhaps the most celebrated recluse in Western literature, should turn out to be one of the most visible characters in contemporary American theater. That's what the great poet, who rarely strayed beyond the boundaries of her garden in the last decades of her life, has become, thanks to the enduring popularity of William Luce's 1976 play The Belle of Amherst. Dickinson's latest local theatrical incarnation is in a new theater in Ambler where, performed by Ceal Phelan, the one-woman play is closing the initial, three-production season of the Act II Playhouse.
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