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Amino Acids

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NEWS
December 31, 1991 | By Mary Walton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Hospital is looking for healthy adults from 25 to 40 years of age, for a study of the effects of bed rest on muscle metabolism. The study is funded by NASA and includes a six-day bed rest in the hospital. Volunteers will be compensated. Stephen Phillips read the ad last fall and reached for the phone. What he heard sounded too good to be true. No dangerous drugs and $100 a day. "Where can you go and relax for six days and get paid for it?" Plus, in his own little way, Phillips could contribute to the conquest of space and perhaps ease human suffering.
FOOD
June 17, 1992 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Baby formulas still don't have the right mix of amino acids to approximate the pattern of human milk, according to a review in the Journal of Nutrition. Cow's milk-based formulas are different in tryptophan and the sulfur amino acids; whey-protein formulas are too high in threonine; and casein formulas are too high in aromatic amino acids. According to the review, these differences may place some infants at risk for brain and liver damage. Researchers suggest that a particular protein fraction - alpha-lactalbumin - could improve the amino acid makeup of baby formulas.
FOOD
February 25, 1987 | By JANE FONDA, Special to the Daily News
Editor's note: Jane Fonda, like millions of other American women, once put herself through a debilitating cycle of crash diets, pills and binges in the effort to achieve an "ideal" figure. She learned the hard way that the real goal is in achieving your best and healthiest self - losing fat but retaining muscle, raising your metabolism and lowering your natural set-point weight. Now, in "Jane Fonda's New Workout and Weight Loss Program," she makes her hard-won knowledge available to everyone.
SPORTS
June 15, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
The University of Oklahoma identified two drinks containing amino acids as the impermissible nutritional supplements it provided to football players last season, resulting in a secondary violation of NCAA rules. In a fact sheet released last night, the university said it gave players Cytomax and Endurox R4, which it identified as "ready-to-drink health supplements. " Oklahoma said both supplements "are permissible substances for NCAA student-athletes to ingest, although it is impermissible for NCAA members to provide the products to student-athletes.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd
GGG TTC TTG GGA GCA TCA AGG AAG CAC TAT GGG TCA. That bit of apparent gibberish is actually part of the genetic code for the virus that causes AIDS. It is written in the alphabet of life - the still- mysterious language that determines whether you are man or woman, lettuce or tomato, amoeba or whale. The language looks deceptively simple. It consists of only four letters - A, C, G and T - that stand for four chemical compounds called nucleotide bases. Their scientific names are adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, and they are made up of different combinations of the common elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen.
LIVING
November 29, 1993 | By Ron King, FOR THE INQUIRER
A couple of summers ago, ultramarathoner Theresa Daus-Weber did a funny thing while preparing for Colorado's Leadville 100: She became a regular flesh-eater. For the last 19 of her 38 years, Daus-Weber had been a vegetarian who ate seafood on rare occasions, but she changed her ways after an earlier attempt at a 100-miler put her in the hospital. The prescription: Rest, drink lots of fluids and pack in the protein. "My husband is my coach, and he's always after me to eat more protein," Daus-Weber says.
LIVING
November 9, 1986 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
If a little is good, more must be better, right? Don't count on it insofar as protein is concerned. Although it's a fact that adolescent athletes and body-builders require more protein than inactive individuals, it is a misconception that they need to consume gobs of protein to provide energy for their rigorous lifestyles. To understand how much protein athletes (and non-athletes) need, take a look at protein itself. Proteins, fats and carbohydrates are the three main energy-producing nutrients we need to stay healthy.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
These days, in supermarkets across the country, people look more like detectives than shoppers. There's no doubt that smart buyers are reading food labels carefully, trying diligently to control their intake of sodium, fats, cholesterol, calories and a host of additives and preservatives. But even if you think you know everything about deciphering labels, here's something you may have missed - a message that reads, "Phenylketonurics: contains Phenylalanine. " If you want to see it for yourself, look carefully at a can of diet soda.
FOOD
February 4, 1987 | By MERLE ELLIS, Special to the Daily News
It's going to be very interesting, this coming year, to watch what's going on in the meat industry. There are so many exciting things in the works. Cybill Shepherd is going to sell beef - now that's exciting! TV and film personalities Cybill Shepherd and James Garner have agreed to become spokespersons for the beef industry's new $25-30 million ad campaign to tell consumers that "beef is back. " Even if the basic message is as weak as the "beef gives strength" campaign of last year, it's bound to get more positive attention.
NEWS
January 30, 1986 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allegations that Bob Kenig, Marple Newtown High School football coach, promoted the use of steroids among team members are "unfounded," a Marple Newtown School District investigation has found. In a news release dated Jan. 20, administrative assistant Stephen G. Frederick said, "The rumors regarding distribution of steroids have proven to be totally unfounded but unfortunately the unsubstantiated allegations reflected badly on the district, the coach and especially the kids. Kids are what we're all about.
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SPORTS
June 15, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
The University of Oklahoma identified two drinks containing amino acids as the impermissible nutritional supplements it provided to football players last season, resulting in a secondary violation of NCAA rules. In a fact sheet released last night, the university said it gave players Cytomax and Endurox R4, which it identified as "ready-to-drink health supplements. " Oklahoma said both supplements "are permissible substances for NCAA student-athletes to ingest, although it is impermissible for NCAA members to provide the products to student-athletes.
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The squall that blew through the Olympics last week - athletes testing positive for banned substances, ugly backbiting over those who may have cheated but weren't caught - obscured a more subtle reality: that there is no sharp line between those who use performance-enhancing substances and those who do not. Sports pharmacology, often under the rubric "nutrition," is an increasingly accepted component of elite training. Many competitors in swimming, track and field, weight lifting, and other sports take megadoses of supplements, vitamins, herbal extracts and chemical compounds.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two-week-old Harold was howling his displeasure. The nurse had just drawn blood and delivered the vial into the waiting hands of pediatrician D. Holmes Morton. He quickly began analyzing its contents in a mass spectrometer that occupied a corner of his laboratory. Within minutes, Morton would tell the anxious young parents - who had raced the infant there from their home in Kentucky - whether Harold was out of danger. They waited nervously in the hall, trying to comfort the boy. Harold suffers from a rare metabolic disorder, maple syrup urine disease, that can strike shortly after birth.
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two-week-old Harold was howling his displeasure. The nurse had just drawn blood and delivered the vial into the waiting hands of pediatrician D. Holmes Morton. He quickly began analyzing its contents in a mass spectrometer that occupied a corner of his laboratory. Within minutes, Morton would tell the anxious young parents - who had raced the infant there from their home in Kentucky - whether Harold was out of danger. They waited nervously in the hall, trying to comfort the boy. Harold suffers from a rare metabolic disorder, maple syrup urine disease, that can strike shortly after birth.
LIVING
November 29, 1993 | By Ron King, FOR THE INQUIRER
A couple of summers ago, ultramarathoner Theresa Daus-Weber did a funny thing while preparing for Colorado's Leadville 100: She became a regular flesh-eater. For the last 19 of her 38 years, Daus-Weber had been a vegetarian who ate seafood on rare occasions, but she changed her ways after an earlier attempt at a 100-miler put her in the hospital. The prescription: Rest, drink lots of fluids and pack in the protein. "My husband is my coach, and he's always after me to eat more protein," Daus-Weber says.
FOOD
June 17, 1992 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Baby formulas still don't have the right mix of amino acids to approximate the pattern of human milk, according to a review in the Journal of Nutrition. Cow's milk-based formulas are different in tryptophan and the sulfur amino acids; whey-protein formulas are too high in threonine; and casein formulas are too high in aromatic amino acids. According to the review, these differences may place some infants at risk for brain and liver damage. Researchers suggest that a particular protein fraction - alpha-lactalbumin - could improve the amino acid makeup of baby formulas.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | By Mary Walton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University Hospital is looking for healthy adults from 25 to 40 years of age, for a study of the effects of bed rest on muscle metabolism. The study is funded by NASA and includes a six-day bed rest in the hospital. Volunteers will be compensated. Stephen Phillips read the ad last fall and reached for the phone. What he heard sounded too good to be true. No dangerous drugs and $100 a day. "Where can you go and relax for six days and get paid for it?" Plus, in his own little way, Phillips could contribute to the conquest of space and perhaps ease human suffering.
NEWS
June 3, 1991 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Chemistry professor Dr. Madeleine M. Joullie couldn't imagine what she had done wrong. "I was sitting right here, and this man showed up and said, 'I'm from the Secret Service,' " recalls Joullie, who has taught at the University of Pennsylvania since the early 1950s. The government agent assured the French-born, Brazilian-reared Joullie that she was in no trouble. He said he had gotten her name from a former student now working with the Secret Service. The agent wanted to know if the organic chemist might look into improving or developing new compounds for taking fingerprints.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Pat Croce, Special to The Inquirer
These days, in supermarkets across the country, people look more like detectives than shoppers. There's no doubt that smart buyers are reading food labels carefully, trying diligently to control their intake of sodium, fats, cholesterol, calories and a host of additives and preservatives. But even if you think you know everything about deciphering labels, here's something you may have missed - a message that reads, "Phenylketonurics: contains Phenylalanine. " If you want to see it for yourself, look carefully at a can of diet soda.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd
GGG TTC TTG GGA GCA TCA AGG AAG CAC TAT GGG TCA. That bit of apparent gibberish is actually part of the genetic code for the virus that causes AIDS. It is written in the alphabet of life - the still- mysterious language that determines whether you are man or woman, lettuce or tomato, amoeba or whale. The language looks deceptively simple. It consists of only four letters - A, C, G and T - that stand for four chemical compounds called nucleotide bases. Their scientific names are adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine, and they are made up of different combinations of the common elements carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen.
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