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Ammonia

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FOOD
June 22, 1988 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I have been baking ammonia cookies for years. Could you help me find dry cooking or baker's ammonia? I've tried several prescription counters to no avail. Fran Frain Chicago, Ill. A. My pharmacist informs me that baking ammonia, also known as carbonate of ammonia, ammonium carbonate and hartshorn, is rarely kept in stock at drug stores because hardly anyone ever asks for it anymore. He told me that in his own experience he gets requests for baking ammonia during the Christmas holidays from elderly Swedish and Norwegian ladies, so he stocks it in little vials at that time.
FOOD
January 11, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I'm having difficulty getting combs and brushes clean. Can you help? - Garry Dear Garry: Frequent washing makes the job easier, since oil, dust and dirt don't have time to build up. However, if you have a comb or brush that's tough to clean, try soaking it in warm water to which you've added a few drops of household ammonia. Ammonia dissolves grease and should soak those combs and brushes clean. A brief brushing with an old toothbrush is an excellent way to dislodge any remaining dirt and make those implements sparkle before a final rinse in clear water.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It's as Philadelphian as cheesesteak, as American as ice cream. At Quality Foods in Lawncrest, they use more than 12 tons of it at a time, cycling it through the cooling equipment like the steak processing plant's life blood. Plain, old-fashioned ammonia - a staple in food production and cold storage - is gaining even more industrial popularity now that CFCs are being phased out to prevent damage to the ozone. Ammonia is among the chemicals that most concern Philadelphia emergency planners because of its common use near residential neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Illicit drug-makers are sneaking onto farms and stealing a common chemical fertilizer also used to produce illegal methamphetamine. And their sloppy handling of the dangerous chemical is endangering the American public, the Environmental Protection Agency warned yesterday. In an unusual chemical safety alert, the EPA warned anhydrous ammonia users to beef up security because theft-triggered chemical accidents were soaring. The corrosive chemical can be fatal when inhaled, burns the skin, and is highly explosive.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
A woman was arrested after killing a stray cat and injuring two others by dousing them with ammonia Tuesday afternoon in the Mill Creek section of West Philadelphia, authorities said. The woman, who lives in the 4800 block of Westminster Street, was trying to get rid of stray cats in her neighborhood, said George Bengal, head of humane law enforcement for the Pennsylvania SPCA. "If people have an issue with cats in their neighborhood, there are agencies and organizations that can help.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not a bad life being a brown trout in Valley Creek, as far as scientists can tell - but it could be better. Levels of ammonia in the creek block the fish from doing what comes naturally - swimming upstream to spawn. Biologists are puzzled about the source of the ammonia, usually found in sewage waste. More study is needed to determine the health of Valley Creek, which flows through Valley Forge National Historical Park into the Schuylkill near Washington's headquarters.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We moved into a home with 20-year-old sliding glass doors that were treated with what appears to be a thin plastic coating or plastic shield for sun glare. Is there any way to remove this coating? One slider has clouded over, and the coating has chipped and blistered in spots. It could be a broken seal, but the areas that have no coating are perfectly clear. Answer: The best solution I've read is from my buddies the Carey Bros. of San Francisco: Spray the coating with ammonia, cover it immediately with Saran Wrap, wait 45 minutes, and then scrape it off with a broad-blade putty knife.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | By Lyn A.E. McCafferty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The 1930s-vintage Delaware County Prison has double trouble with its sewage plant: The system just wasn't built to handle the amount of sewage that flows through it now, and excessive levels of ammonia are being discharged into a tributary of Chester Creek. The prison's antiquated sewage system, built 62 years ago, was designed to handle the sewage of 600 inmates - half of today's prison population. As a result, the county has embarked on a $1.5 million project to build a new sewage-treatment plant.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
A 61-year-old man who tried to unclog his toilet by mixing household chemicals died yesterday afternoon when he was overcome by fumes. Two city fire-rescue paramedics who went to his aid were also hospitalized, though they apparently were not seriously hurt. The man, Edward Maj, of K Street near Lycoming in the Juniata section, collapsed in his second-floor bathroom about 3:35 p.m., officials said. They said that in an effort to unclog a second-floor toilet, he mixed household bleach, household ammonia and a drain cleaner.
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NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We moved into a home with 20-year-old sliding glass doors that were treated with what appears to be a thin plastic coating or plastic shield for sun glare. Is there any way to remove this coating? One slider has clouded over, and the coating has chipped and blistered in spots. It could be a broken seal, but the areas that have no coating are perfectly clear. Answer: The best solution I've read is from my buddies the Carey Bros. of San Francisco: Spray the coating with ammonia, cover it immediately with Saran Wrap, wait 45 minutes, and then scrape it off with a broad-blade putty knife.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Marcia Dunn, Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Astronauts making a rare, hastily planned space walk replaced a pump outside the International Space Station on Saturday in hopes of plugging a serious ammonia leak. The prospects of success grew as the minutes, then hours, passed and no frozen flecks of ammonia appeared. Mission Control said it appeared the leak may have been plugged, although additional monitoring over the coming weeks will be needed before declaring a victory. "I will tell you that we're happy.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
A woman was arrested after killing a stray cat and injuring two others by dousing them with ammonia Tuesday afternoon in the Mill Creek section of West Philadelphia, authorities said. The woman, who lives in the 4800 block of Westminster Street, was trying to get rid of stray cats in her neighborhood, said George Bengal, head of humane law enforcement for the Pennsylvania SPCA. "If people have an issue with cats in their neighborhood, there are agencies and organizations that can help.
NEWS
March 24, 2008 | Daily News wire services
Fuel line bombed? PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Twenty-five trucks carrying fuel to U.S.-led forces in Afghanistan have been destroyed in a possible bomb attack on the Pakistani border. Dozens of injuries are reported. Fishing boat sinks off Alaska; 4 dead, 1 missing ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Four crew members are dead and one is missing after a Seattle-based fishing boat began sinking yesterday off Dutch Harbor, Alaska, according to the Coast Guard. Forty-two other crew members who abandoned ship early in the morning have been recovered safely, said Coast Guard Lt. Eric Eggen.
NEWS
June 29, 2006 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Cleaning up after flooding presents peculiar challenges. Following are some issues that might arise. Question: How do I get rid of the smell after a flood at my house? Answer: After removing water and mud with a broom or wet-dry vacuum, spray surfaces with lukewarm water, starting with the floor, then moving to the walls and working up. Use a coarse brush or long-handled broom to scrub these surfaces. Then use hot water with a heavy-duty cleaner to scrub all surfaces, again from the bottom to the top. Follow with a rinse, using a brush moistened with a solution of 2 tablespoons of chlorine bleach per gallon of water.
NEWS
June 17, 2006 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than four dozen residents and 30 workers were evacuated yesterday morning after an ammonia leak at a food-processing plant sent a potent smell through the 600 block of West Sedgley Avenue in North Philadelphia, authorities said. Although ammonia is toxic, no injuries were reported, said Executive Fire Chief Daniel Williams. Residents reported the smell about 8:30 a.m., as workers were already evacuating Yardley Farms, an egg-processing plant where a refrigeration valve failed, authorities said.
NEWS
August 31, 2005 | By Roy J. Rosser
A 1995 Massachusetts Institute of Technology survey revealed most people think inventors are old and eccentric. Unhappy with such a stereotype, the people at Inventors Digest set out to improve their image. From this effort sprang the designation of August as National Inventors Month, during which the public is encouraged to consider the real, hopefully not-so-old and not-so-eccentric people behind the products that have enriched our society. What better way to mark the month than to think about the question, "Of all the inventors from New Jersey, who was the most influential?"
BUSINESS
July 11, 2003 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A refrigeration system at a South Philadelphia food-processing company poses a serious and potentially fatal safety hazard to its 700 workers, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration said in issuing 76 violations and assessing $183,600 in penalties. But the company, Procacci Brothers Sales, said it would appeal the July 3 citations because OSHA is heavy-handed, and because workers have not died or been seriously injured. "Isn't it odd that they cited us even though we have a safety committee with union members and our engineers, and we adhere to highest safety [standards]
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Illicit drug-makers are sneaking onto farms and stealing a common chemical fertilizer also used to produce illegal methamphetamine. And their sloppy handling of the dangerous chemical is endangering the American public, the Environmental Protection Agency warned yesterday. In an unusual chemical safety alert, the EPA warned anhydrous ammonia users to beef up security because theft-triggered chemical accidents were soaring. The corrosive chemical can be fatal when inhaled, burns the skin, and is highly explosive.
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