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Ammonium Nitrate

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NEWS
June 6, 1995 | by Russell Seitz, New York Times
It takes a great deal of fertilizer to feed the world. Ammonium nitrate, made by the millions of tons out of air and water, and readily available in farm supply stores, is equally serviceable as an explosive and a plant food. Yet it was sold without question - until the federal building was bombed in Oklahoma City. Now the victims of that bombing have sued the manufacturer of the ammonium nitrate, asking why, since it can be rendered harmless, they were put at risk. Despite the carnage, this cornucopia of destructive potential flows on. Ten dollars buys all the ammonium nitrate you can carry.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - On a gray afternoon Thursday, Sen. Bob Casey attended yet another Arlington National Cemetery interment for a Pennsylvania soldier, killed while searching for homemade bombs in Afghanistan. The death of Army Spec. Dale J. Kridlo of Hughestown, Luzerne County, came only days before another area soldier, Spec. Anthony Vargos of Reading, was killed by an improvised explosive device, or IED. IEDs are the chief killer of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and Casey has targeted the primary explosive ingredient behind them - ammonium nitrate, which has legitimate uses but more often is smuggled over the porous Pakistani border for nefarious purposes.
NEWS
May 18, 1995 | By Russell Gold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On April 19, when a bomb made of fuel oil and common farm fertilizer killed 167 people in Oklahoma City, Charles M. Saffer Jr. immediately thought of Patent No. 3,366,468. If only, was the 80-year-old Levittown chemist's second thought. More than 100 miles away in Virginia, Samuel J. Porter, 78, experienced a similar mental flash. He, too, found himself asking what if? Three decades ago, Saffer and Porter had seen the possibility of a tragedy like the one in Oklahoma City, and thought they had a way to prevent it. Together they had developed a process to generate nonexplosive fertilizer.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | By David Zucchino and Steve Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities tightened their web of evidence against Terry Lynn Nichols yesterday, saying they had found bomb-making materials similar to those used in the Oklahoma City explosion at his home. In an affidavit unsealed as part of a court hearing in Oklahoma, the FBI said it found five 60-foot detonator cords, blasting caps and ground-up ammonium nitrate in Nichols' home in Herington, Kan. Federal bomb experts quoted in the document said those same materials made up the bomb that crumpled the federal building in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Trucks overturned on two major area highways within 90 minutes yesterday afternoon, shutting down the roads and causing traffic nightmares for commuters late into the evening rush hour. The first crash occurred in Plymouth Township about noon, when a tanker truck carrying a nine-ton load of the explosive ammonium nitrate overturned on a ramp leading from the eastbound Pennsylvania Turnpike to the northbound lanes of the turnpike's Northeast Extension (Route 476). The tanker spilled about a ton of the granular substance and about 200 gallons of diesel fuel over the road, said John Gerdelmann, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection, which supervised the cleanup.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - American and coalition forces in Afghanistan will be more vulnerable to improvised explosive devices as the military draws down troops next year, a senior Pentagon official said Thursday. Lt. Gen. Michael Barbero described his concerns about what is the top cause of military and civilian deaths in Afghanistan and Pakistan in congressional testimony that also underscored U.S. frustration with Islamabad's efforts to thwart the production of the devices known as IEDs, most of which are fertilizer-based explosives.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | By David Zucchino, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In two disasters two years apart, the ingredients were familiar and prosaic: A van, an office building, and a homemade bomb most likely made from common fertilizer and fuel oil. Like the World Trade Center explosion, the bombing of the federal building in downtown Oklahoma City yesterday exploited the relative ease of constructing, delivering and detonating a bomb powerful enough to crumple a high-rise building. "You can make a simple homemade bomb from common material you find anywhere.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | by Jerry Capeci and Tom Robbins, New York Daily News
Anybody could have done it. Yesterday's disclosure that the key ingredients - fertilizer and fuel oil - used in the deadly World Trade Center blast were common, everyday items has made an already wide-open investigation even broader. "It really could be almost anybody," a high-level government intelligence source said. The disclosure came as an army of investigators launched a wide-ranging search for clues to Friday's lethal explosion. Although the city police department remained the lead agency in the probe, the FBI moved one step closer to invoking its control when regional director James Fox officially confirmed a bomb had caused the blast.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | Daily News wire services
'I'll take it like a man,' ex-cop says on way to jail A retired Boston police officer was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison for hiding an arsenal of weapons for his gangster brother, Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi. Federal prosecutors said Michael Flemmi, 64, hid the guns for the Winter Hill Gang, run by his brother and James "Whitey" Bulger, a fugitive on the FBI's "Most Wanted" list. Flemmi, a 30-year police veteran, was convicted in May of perjury, obstruction of justice and weapons charges tied to the cache of 50 guns.
NEWS
June 24, 2012
Pope, cardinals meet on leak VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI convened a special meeting of cardinals Saturday for advice on how to deal with the Vatican's leaked documents scandal - another sign of the damage the leaks have done to trust in the Holy See's governance. Benedict was already scheduled to attend a regular meeting of the heads of Vatican offices Saturday morning. The Vatican press office said he added a second meeting later in the day with other cardinals in a bid to try to "restore a climate of serenity and trust" in the church.
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NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - American and coalition forces in Afghanistan will be more vulnerable to improvised explosive devices as the military draws down troops next year, a senior Pentagon official said Thursday. Lt. Gen. Michael Barbero described his concerns about what is the top cause of military and civilian deaths in Afghanistan and Pakistan in congressional testimony that also underscored U.S. frustration with Islamabad's efforts to thwart the production of the devices known as IEDs, most of which are fertilizer-based explosives.
NEWS
June 24, 2012
Pope, cardinals meet on leak VATICAN CITY - Pope Benedict XVI convened a special meeting of cardinals Saturday for advice on how to deal with the Vatican's leaked documents scandal - another sign of the damage the leaks have done to trust in the Holy See's governance. Benedict was already scheduled to attend a regular meeting of the heads of Vatican offices Saturday morning. The Vatican press office said he added a second meeting later in the day with other cardinals in a bid to try to "restore a climate of serenity and trust" in the church.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Eileen Sullivan, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - More than 15 years after a fertilizer bomb was used to blow up a government building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people, the federal government is proposing to regulate the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate. The proposal comes nearly four years after Congress gave the Homeland Security Department the authority to develop a program to regulate the compound. Ammonium nitrate is one of the most common farm fertilizers in the world, and instructions for turning it into a bomb are available on the Internet.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By John Shiffman, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - On a gray afternoon Thursday, Sen. Bob Casey attended yet another Arlington National Cemetery interment for a Pennsylvania soldier, killed while searching for homemade bombs in Afghanistan. The death of Army Spec. Dale J. Kridlo of Hughestown, Luzerne County, came only days before another area soldier, Spec. Anthony Vargos of Reading, was killed by an improvised explosive device, or IED. IEDs are the chief killer of U.S. troops in Afghanistan, and Casey has targeted the primary explosive ingredient behind them - ammonium nitrate, which has legitimate uses but more often is smuggled over the porous Pakistani border for nefarious purposes.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Canadian authorities thwarted what they believed to be a major terrorist threat on home soil with the arrests of 17 people "inspired by al-Qaeda" who had stockpiled three times the amount of explosive used in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the country's national police announced yesterday. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said the suspects - 12 men and five juveniles - were all Canadian residents, mostly from the Toronto area, and were rounded up in raids carried out between Friday afternoon and early yesterday morning.
NEWS
September 10, 2002 | Daily News wire services
'I'll take it like a man,' ex-cop says on way to jail A retired Boston police officer was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison for hiding an arsenal of weapons for his gangster brother, Stephen "The Rifleman" Flemmi. Federal prosecutors said Michael Flemmi, 64, hid the guns for the Winter Hill Gang, run by his brother and James "Whitey" Bulger, a fugitive on the FBI's "Most Wanted" list. Flemmi, a 30-year police veteran, was convicted in May of perjury, obstruction of justice and weapons charges tied to the cache of 50 guns.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Trucks overturned on two major area highways within 90 minutes yesterday afternoon, shutting down the roads and causing traffic nightmares for commuters late into the evening rush hour. The first crash occurred in Plymouth Township about noon, when a tanker truck carrying a nine-ton load of the explosive ammonium nitrate overturned on a ramp leading from the eastbound Pennsylvania Turnpike to the northbound lanes of the turnpike's Northeast Extension (Route 476). The tanker spilled about a ton of the granular substance and about 200 gallons of diesel fuel over the road, said John Gerdelmann, a spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection, which supervised the cleanup.
NEWS
February 21, 1998 | By Monica Yant, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two thousand pounds of ammonium nitrate mixed with diesel fuel, the explosive combination used in the Oklahoma City bombing, was stolen from a Western Pennsylvania coal mining company earlier this week, federal authorities disclosed yesterday. They said it was the largest explosives theft in the nation in five years. The theft of the ready-to-detonate explosives from the C&K Coal Co., in Sligo, also included 560 electric blasting caps and 13,000 feet of detonating cord - enough "to cause some major damage," said Brian Burns, a spokesman for the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
NEWS
May 31, 1997 | By Michael Dorman
With all the commotion about the FBI's recent problems - from laboratory sloppiness to hostage-situation miscalculations to the Atlanta Olympics bombing blunders - it is often forgotten that the bureau is still perhaps the world's most effective investigative agency. The trial of Timothy McVeigh in the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people bears witness to that. No matter what the outcome of the case, which went to the jury yesterday, the testimony and evidence have demonstrated that the FBI's methodical investigative techniques produce results.
NEWS
July 2, 1996 | By Angie Cannon and Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU This article contains information from the Associated Press
Twelve members of an Arizona paramilitary group that called itself the Viper Militia were arrested yesterday on charges of plotting to blow up government buildings in Phoenix, federal officials announced. The militia group engaged in field training exercises in which members made and detonated ammonium nitrate bombs and rockets, according to a seven-count indictment unsealed in Phoenix and announced here. An ammonium nitrate bomb was used to destroy the federal building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995, killing 168 people.
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