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TRAVEL
March 18, 2012 | By Helen Anders, AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN
AMSTERDAM - Dude, your days of lighting up a joint in a Netherlands coffee shop are numbered. Dutch authorities just plain got fed up with wrecked tourists. As of Jan. 1, a new law redefined marijuana-selling coffee shops in southern Netherlands (Limburg and Zeeland, for example) as private clubs, limited to 2,000 legal Dutch adults who are, quite literally, card-carrying potheads. In January 2013, the same will apply to Amsterdam and the rest of the country. This law wasn't passed lightly.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | By Dave Barry
Here, as promised last week, is the second and final part of my sport on the fact-finding mission I took to the Netherlands to increase international understanding, a cause that - as the great humanitarian Florence Nightingale so often pointed out as she toiled among the sick and wounded - is tax-deductible if you write about it. My topic today is Amsterdam, which is the largest city in the Netherlands, unless it is not (somebody should look...
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Beverly Levitt FOR THE INQUIRER
While I was in Amsterdam last year, I discovered Sandwichshop Sal-Meijer, which had just celebrated its 50th anniversary. Amsterdam food critic Johannes van Dam, who can make or break a restaurant, awarded the unassuming kosher deli, best known for its fish cakes, corned beef, pastrami, and half-and-half (corned beef and sliced liver) sandwiches a "9-plus," accompanied by a glowing review. Not only is the menu considered the best Jewish fare in the country; this pared-down version of a New York deli - decidedly more Flatbush Avenue than Seventh Avenue - is called the second shul, or synagogue, where in 1945, survivors of World War II would come every day in hopes of seeing friends who also had survived.
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | By Merilyn Jackson FOR THE INQUIRER
Since its founding a quarter-century ago, Nederlands Dans Theater II has been called various names: Springplunk, because it served as a springboard for its dancers into the main body of Nederlands Dans Theater; Aspirans, because the dancers aspired to the main company; and even Juniors, because it has been for those under 21. But now, the well-respected, ballet-based company - which will debut in the area tonight at the Annenberg Center for...
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - The city plans to raise the minimum age for prostitutes from 18 to 21 and force brothels to close during early-morning hours. At a news conference Tuesday, Mayor Eberhard van der Laan said the moves came from a decision to crack down on crime in the city's famed Red Light District and protect sex workers - mostly women - from abuse. Amsterdam is home to about 8,000 professional sex workers, the city estimates, half of whom operate behind windows with red velvet curtains and red lights.
NEWS
March 29, 1987 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amsterdam probably offers a tourist more variety than other European city, from hashish and hookers to Rembrandt and Rubens. City fathers don't dwell on Amsterdam's sinful reputation, but they're making a big deal of its cultural attributes. This is Amsterdam's year to be "Cultural Capital of Europe," as designated by the European Community. (Berlin and Paris will be honored in 1988 and 1989.) All year, Amsterdam will be aflutter with ballet, opera, musicals and special exhibitions at the pre-eminent Rijksmuseum, Stedelijk Museum and Van Gogh Museum.
NEWS
October 8, 2000 | By Lini S. Kadaba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We had just begun our tour of the Vincent van Gogh Museum, a delight of ochres, oranges and burnt sienna amid a frenzy of brushstrokes, when a little voice mused: "I think van Gogh doesn't know how to draw sunflowers so well. I want to go. " It was a statement of fact with no room for negotiation. Everybody's a critic - even a kid who's 3 years old. I had thought this would be an opportunity to expose Rohan to some fine masterpieces. Wrong! We raced through the rest of the bright, modern galleries, Dad agreeing to tackle the cranky critic so Mom could enjoy those poorly rendered sunflowers.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - Amsterdam's mayor said Wednesday that he would formally ban students from smoking marijuana at school, making the Dutch capital the first city in the Netherlands to do so. Eberhard van der Laan's introduction of an ordinance that in other countries either already exists or seems so obvious it would not require a rule is the result of the Netherlands' unique drug policy. Under the "tolerance" principle, marijuana is technically illegal here, but police cannot prosecute people for possession of small amounts.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The symptom of a good concert at Amsterdam's venerable Concertgebouw, which has been one of the world's greatest halls since it opened in 1888, is not a standing ovation. "They do that for everybody," explained one veteran Dutch concertgoer as the audience rose at the end of the Philadelphia Orchestra's performance of Mahler's Symphony No. 1 on Sunday. One theory claims the concert hall's seats were so uncomfortable until recently that standing ovations were prompted by the audience's simple desire to stand.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | FOR THE INQUIRER
Ger Hendrika Lubach Van Raan, 84, a Dutch-born psychiatric nurse who, with her husband, risked her life to shelter two Jewish boys during the Nazi occupation of Holland, died Sunday. Ms. Van Raan, formerly of Arden, Del., suffered a heart attack at the home of her daughter, Heleena, in Montclair, where she had lived for the last two years. Her husband, Gerard M. Van Raan, died in 1992. The couple, married in a Catholic ceremony, were newlyweds in The Hague in 1942, when a friend in the anti-Nazi underground asked them to shelter an 8-year-old Jewish boy, Rudolf Klijnkramer.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2015
THIS IS my year for beer travel, with group tours planned to Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Austria, as well as several Eastern U.S. destinations. I got things started earlier this month by leading about 150 beer lovers on a very cool river cruise to the Netherlands and Belgium. Eight breweries, two lectures, a beer dinner and many onboard bottle-shares later, and I'm left with exactly what I look for in travel: a sense of surprise. Here are a few discoveries that caught me off guard.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It takes vision to start a new fast-casual restaurant concept in a town like Philadelphia that's brimming with lunch options. And it takes something rarer and bolder than that to do so while still in college. While his Tulane study-abroad pals in the Netherlands no doubt were taking advantage of Amsterdam's more famous offerings, Brennan Foxman was busy studying restaurant business models. At the tender age of 22, the New Jersey native launched the Asian-inspired Wokworks at 1935 Chestnut St. It serves stir-fries of both the predesigned and build-your-own varieties, and he hopes it'll become the next Chipotle.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
OK, YOU OBSESSED TWEEN. Give it back. The bench upon which the star-crossed teenage lovers kiss in the hit film "The Fault in Our Stars" is missing, and the city of Amsterdam isn't quite sure whether it's the fault of a prank, star-crossed lovers or fate. The fact is no one even missed it. The green bench that used to sit on the Leidsegracht resembles hundreds of others around the city, and its absence went unnoticed for at least a month - probably because someone placed a large flower pot on the spot.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
By Fouad Ajami 'We swear by the almighty Allah we will never stop fighting you until you leave us alone: We must fight them as they fight us, an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth. " This was Michael Adebolajo, age 28, born in the United Kingdom to a devoted Christian family of Nigerian background. His hands covered with the blood of a young off-duty British soldier, Lee Rigby, Adebolajo and a younger accomplice made no effort to flee the scene of the crime last week in London.
TRAVEL
March 18, 2013 | By Fred Vodde Jr., For The Inquirer
It was getting late. A pleasant, memorable evening of barhopping was coming to an end. We'd sampled some of the best pubs and ales Amsterdam has to offer. One more stop, one more Heineken, and we'd call it a night. From the vantage point of an ages-old corner booth, my brother Rob and I reveled in the ambience: the music and dancing, the camaraderie, the warmth and the cozy atmosphere so characteristic of Amsterdam and the Dutch. What better than a "borrowed" Heineken glass to capture the memory?
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - The city plans to raise the minimum age for prostitutes from 18 to 21 and force brothels to close during early-morning hours. At a news conference Tuesday, Mayor Eberhard van der Laan said the moves came from a decision to crack down on crime in the city's famed Red Light District and protect sex workers - mostly women - from abuse. Amsterdam is home to about 8,000 professional sex workers, the city estimates, half of whom operate behind windows with red velvet curtains and red lights.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - Amsterdam's mayor said Wednesday that he would formally ban students from smoking marijuana at school, making the Dutch capital the first city in the Netherlands to do so. Eberhard van der Laan's introduction of an ordinance that in other countries either already exists or seems so obvious it would not require a rule is the result of the Netherlands' unique drug policy. Under the "tolerance" principle, marijuana is technically illegal here, but police cannot prosecute people for possession of small amounts.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | Reprinted from the Oct. 14, 2011, editions of The Inquirer. Lantern Theater's current production presents the same cast and set design as the 2011 staging. By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'We are tolerant, but we have our limits," says a city official. Somehow 17th-century Amsterdam sounds oddly familiar, especially when it comes to immigrants, religious broad-mindedness, interfaith romances, and radical new ideas. And so this play by David Ives, New Jerusalem, The Interrogation of Baruch de Spinoza at Talmud Torah Congregation: Amsterdam, July 27, 1656 , at Lantern Theater, launches an absorbing, 2½-hour theological debate. The Portuguese Jews had fled persecution and found refuge in Holland, but their safety came at a price: obedience and silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012
Theater Cape May Stage: The 39 Steps Fast-paced stage adaptation of the Hitchcock mystery. Closes 9/7. Robert Shackleton Playhouse, Bank & Lafayette Sts., Cape May; Box Office: 609-884-1341. www.capemaystage.org . $35; $30 seniors; $15 students. Deathtrap Comic thriller about a playwright scheming to steal one of his students' works. Closes 9/23. Hedgerow Theatre, 64 Rose Valley Rd., Media; 610-565-4211. $25-32; $22-29 seniors; $10 students and children. East Lynne Theater Company: The Poe Mysteries World premiere theatrical adaptation of several of Edgar Allan Poe's mystery stories.
NEWS
April 22, 2012
Egypt's military: No hand in vote CAIRO - The head of Egypt's armed forces Saturday rejected accusations that the military is throwing its weight behind a candidate in next month's presidential elections a day after thousands of people demonstrated against the ruling generals. The statement came from Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, who leads the military council that has ruled Egypt since Hosni Mubarak's ouster last year. Protesters have accused the generals of trying to manipulate the May presidential vote.
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