FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Top Amtrak officials collect salaries of $200,000 or more, according to records made public in response to Freedom of Information Act requests by The Inquirer. Amtrak, the taxpayer-subsidized national railroad, routinely refuses to divulge officials' salaries when it announces their hiring. Amtrak received about $1.3 billion in public money last year, including about $400 million for operating costs. These are the salaries of some officials hired in recent months, Amtrak disclosed in response to the newspaper's freedom-of-information requests: Gerald Sokol Jr., chief financial officer, $300,000.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Boardman, chief executive of Amtrak, defended Amtrak's safety record Thursday, even as he lamented that Tuesday's deadly derailment may "have destroyed the confidence of people" who ride the railroad. He also said Amtrak has been underfunded for decades and must have more money to rebuild the century-old underpinnings of the Northeast Corridor, the nation's busiest rail route. He said Amtrak officials have not interviewed the engineer of Train 188, who apparently was operating the train at twice the 50-mile-per-hour speed limit entering a sharp curve in Port Richmond.
NEWS
March 19, 2011
Amtrak said Saturday afternoon that it had resumed service in the Northeast Corridor -- and on its Keystone Service, across Pennsylvania -- after a temporary suspension because of earlier power outages. "Passengers should expect residual delays along these routes," Amtrak said. SEPTA reported at 11:45 a.m. Saturday that delays on its regional rail lines were gradually coming to an end. It said it was resuming regular train service after earlier disruptions caused by Amtrak power problems.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
The Amtrak police force abides by local procedures for handling cases in which an individual appears to be a threat to himself or others. At 30th Street Station, we would abide by the Philadelphia police force's procedures. Rick Remington Amtrak spokesperson
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak's board of directors has selected Anthony R. Coscia as its new chairman. Coscia, 53, of North Caldwell, N.J., is a real estate finance attorney who previously served as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Coscia, appointed to the nine-member Amtrak board by President Obama in 2010, replaces fellow Democrat Thomas C. Carper, of Illinois, whose term expired Saturday.  
NEWS
December 24, 1986
Here we go again. Just a few months ago, the Congress rejected President Reagan's proposal to eliminate Amtrak, and he is back with the same idea. For whatever reason, the President seems obsessed with the desire to abolish Amtrak. The Inquirer's Dec. 16 editorial calling the selling of Amtrak a "fiscal fantasy" is right. Amtrak provides a vital service to our country, and by all means it should be continued in its present form. Amtrak and its employees have, since its inception, continuously improved service and productivity.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak wants a federal judge to invalidate the 39-m.p.h. speed limit set by Pennsauken on trains passing through the township. The National Railroad Passenger Corp., which operates Amtrak, sued the township Friday, arguing that federal regulations regarding train speeds supersede any state or local laws. Concerned about public safety in the wake of plans to build the so-called Gamblers' Express train line between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, Pennsauken passed an ordinance on Oct. 27, 1986, imposing the 39-m.
NEWS
June 12, 2008 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With highways clogged and gas prices soaring, U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D., Pa.) sees Amtrak as a commuting option for his Bucks County constituents who work in New York. Amtrak, however, does not share Murphy's view. The financially strapped national railroad sees its limited Northeast Corridor seats as best utilized by full-fare spot travelers, not daily commuters paying discounted monthly rates. Yesterday, those philosophies were set on a possible collision course when Murphy amended a funding bill to force Amtrak to consider increasing stops and lowering fares for riders using Bucks County's only Amtrak station.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has put on hold the emergency alternative service plan it had developed in anticipation of a strike Wednesday against Amtrak by the Brotherhood of Maintenance & Way Employes. "With Amtrak and the BMWE agreeing yesterday to a one-week extension of the Wednesday 12:01 a.m. strike deadline, we have suspended for the time being implementation of the plan," said Stephan Rosenfeld, SEPTA assistant general manager of public affairs. Plans to begin passing out pamphlets this morning at SEPTA regional rail stations to commuters on the R1 Airport, R2 Newark/ Wilmington, R5 Downingtown/Paoli, R6 Cynwyd, R7 Trenton and R8 Chestnut Hill lines have been suspended as well.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | By NORMAN Y. MINETA
SOMETIMES in government, it takes more than words to bring about change. Earlier this month, President Bush, frustrated that Congress had not moved on his proposed reforms to the passenger rail system, said that subsidies for Amtrak should be eliminated starting Oct. 1. Since then, something interesting has happened: lawmakers, journalists and citizens are starting to talk seriously about the future of passenger trains in America. Many have been critical of the changes the president and I have proposed.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
In the aftermath of Amtrak Train 188's derailment, the crew members staggered to their feet, or regained consciousness, to find a world turned upside down. "Stuff was on top of them," said Akida Henry, 38, an assistant conductor. "People were bleeding. One person was pinned down in a table, like, crushed. Somebody was, like, upside - it was - they were everywhere. " Another assistant conductor, Thomas O'Brien, 34, himself uninjured, was shocked at the devastation. "I just thought, 'How are we all bleeding so much already?
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
National Transportation Safety Board documents released Monday include transcripts of interviews with Amtrak crew members and emergency personnel who responded to the May 12, 2015, derailment of Train 188 at Frankford Junction: Akida Henry, assistant conductor for Train 188: "He [the engineer] was laying on the horn. The next thing, you see something flash and the train is shaking so violently. It's just shaking and shaking and it seemed like forever. Finally, we kind of - I don't know if we flipped or what, but we rolled and slid.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Dana DiFilippo, Staff Writer
A New York-bound Amtrak high-speed Acela train traveling through Bridesburg just before 7 p.m. Sunday was hit by something that smashed a coach window. The incident came the day before the federal investigators are slated to release hundreds of pages of documents in their probe of the crash of an Amtrak train in May in nearby Frankford that claimed the lives of eight people. After the object slammed into the window Sunday night, one startled passenger tweeted that a bullet hit the train, but Amtrak officials said Monday morning they haven't determined what the object was. Taylor Lorenz, 30, a freelance editor from the Park Slope section of Brooklyn, was on the train, a few seats from the broken window.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Brandon Bostian, the engineer on the ill-fated Amtraktrain that crashed May 12, gave investigators sharply differing accounts of what he recalls of the moments before the crash, raising questions about his credibility, two prominent plaintiffs said Monday. Tom Kline and Robert Mongelluzzi said at a press conference that inconsistencies in Bostian's story underscore the need for Bostian to be deposed under oath. Mongeluzzi's firm represents 17 passengers who have filed claims, while Kline & Specter represents 12 victims, including two death claims.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, WASHINGTON BUREAU
WASHINGTON - Federal investigators will open a new window into the deadly Amtrak Train 188 derailment in Philadelphia when they release a trove of documents Monday, including interview transcripts with the engineer. Those interviews could provide the most detailed view yet of Brandon Bostian, the engineer running the train in May when it sped to 106 m.p.h. - more than twice the speed limit for an approaching curve - before hurtling off the tracks in Frankford Junction, killing eight and injuring more than 200. Bostian's lawyer has said the engineer does not remember the crash.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Update Tuesday 8 a.m.: 18 SEPTA bus routes remain out of service.   Almost two days after the last snowflakes fell, about one-fifth of Philadelphia's 122 bus routes remained suspended. By Monday afternoon, 26 routes were still out of service, largely due to unplowed streets, SEPTA officials said. "These operate in neighborhood areas, and to be able to bring a 40-foot bus down a street requires the street to be relatively cleared," said Manuel Smith, spokesman for the transportation authority.
NEWS
December 27, 2015
Train kills 1 in Malvern A person was struck and killed by a train yesterday morning in Malvern, Chester County, disrupting service on Amtrak and SEPTA. Someone trespassing on the tracks was hit about 9:15 a.m. by a Keystone Service train westbound from Philadelphia to Harrisburg, Amtrak said. The train had 100 people on board at the time, Amtrak said. No riders or crew members were injured. The incident prompted SEPTA to suspend service on a section of the Paoli/Thorndale Linefor about three hours.
NEWS
December 22, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A key train safety system is now active on Amtrak rails from Washington to New York. And SEPTA's Regional Rail system is not far behind in activating its own version of the technology, officials have said. Amtrak activated Positive Train Control, which can automatically slow or stop a speeding train, between Philadelphia and New York this past weekend. The system went online from Philadelphia to Washington a week ago, spokeswoman Christina Leeds said Sunday night. The system was already operational on Amtrak rails from New Haven, Conn., to Boston, she said.
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Senate and House approved a sweeping transportation bill Thursday that could help increase the compensation to victims of the May 12 Amtrak crash in Philadelphia and boost funding for rail safety - both steps coming in response to the derailment that killed eight people. The five-year, $305 billion bill includes policy provisions related to highway safety, railroads, and road programs. Several policy riders, though, including one to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, drew criticism, and some faulted the bill for being funded with gimmicks.
NEWS
December 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - More money could become available to compensate victims of the May 12 Amtrak derailment in Philadelphia and fund rail safety upgrades under a bipartisan transportation bill, introduced Tuesday and expected to race to passage in Congress this week. Both provisions are small parts of a 1,300-page, five-year, roughly $300 billion package that touches on highway safety, railroad law, and road programs nationwide. The measure, agreed to by House and Senate negotiators to reconcile competing transportation bills, would raise the accident liability cap for railroads to $295 million, up from a $200 million cap first set in 1997.
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