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NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has Amtrak abandoned its vision of 220-mile-per-hour bullet trains speeding up and down the Northeast Corridor? The railroad recently issued draft specifications for new trains to replace its existing Acelas that call for 160 m.p.h. trains, not the 220 m.p.h. versions Amtrak said in January that it was seeking. Amtrak and the California High-Speed Rail Authority in January announced they were jointly seeking proposals for trains that could run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and the East Coast.
NEWS
March 19, 2011
Amtrak said Saturday afternoon that it had resumed service in the Northeast Corridor -- and on its Keystone Service, across Pennsylvania -- after a temporary suspension because of earlier power outages. "Passengers should expect residual delays along these routes," Amtrak said. SEPTA reported at 11:45 a.m. Saturday that delays on its regional rail lines were gradually coming to an end. It said it was resuming regular train service after earlier disruptions caused by Amtrak power problems.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
The Amtrak police force abides by local procedures for handling cases in which an individual appears to be a threat to himself or others. At 30th Street Station, we would abide by the Philadelphia police force's procedures. Rick Remington Amtrak spokesperson
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amtrak's board of directors has selected Anthony R. Coscia as its new chairman. Coscia, 53, of North Caldwell, N.J., is a real estate finance attorney who previously served as chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Coscia, appointed to the nine-member Amtrak board by President Obama in 2010, replaces fellow Democrat Thomas C. Carper, of Illinois, whose term expired Saturday.  
NEWS
December 24, 1986
Here we go again. Just a few months ago, the Congress rejected President Reagan's proposal to eliminate Amtrak, and he is back with the same idea. For whatever reason, the President seems obsessed with the desire to abolish Amtrak. The Inquirer's Dec. 16 editorial calling the selling of Amtrak a "fiscal fantasy" is right. Amtrak provides a vital service to our country, and by all means it should be continued in its present form. Amtrak and its employees have, since its inception, continuously improved service and productivity.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak wants a federal judge to invalidate the 39-m.p.h. speed limit set by Pennsauken on trains passing through the township. The National Railroad Passenger Corp., which operates Amtrak, sued the township Friday, arguing that federal regulations regarding train speeds supersede any state or local laws. Concerned about public safety in the wake of plans to build the so-called Gamblers' Express train line between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, Pennsauken passed an ordinance on Oct. 27, 1986, imposing the 39-m.
NEWS
June 12, 2008 | By Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With highways clogged and gas prices soaring, U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D., Pa.) sees Amtrak as a commuting option for his Bucks County constituents who work in New York. Amtrak, however, does not share Murphy's view. The financially strapped national railroad sees its limited Northeast Corridor seats as best utilized by full-fare spot travelers, not daily commuters paying discounted monthly rates. Yesterday, those philosophies were set on a possible collision course when Murphy amended a funding bill to force Amtrak to consider increasing stops and lowering fares for riders using Bucks County's only Amtrak station.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA has put on hold the emergency alternative service plan it had developed in anticipation of a strike Wednesday against Amtrak by the Brotherhood of Maintenance & Way Employes. "With Amtrak and the BMWE agreeing yesterday to a one-week extension of the Wednesday 12:01 a.m. strike deadline, we have suspended for the time being implementation of the plan," said Stephan Rosenfeld, SEPTA assistant general manager of public affairs. Plans to begin passing out pamphlets this morning at SEPTA regional rail stations to commuters on the R1 Airport, R2 Newark/ Wilmington, R5 Downingtown/Paoli, R6 Cynwyd, R7 Trenton and R8 Chestnut Hill lines have been suspended as well.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | By NORMAN Y. MINETA
SOMETIMES in government, it takes more than words to bring about change. Earlier this month, President Bush, frustrated that Congress had not moved on his proposed reforms to the passenger rail system, said that subsidies for Amtrak should be eliminated starting Oct. 1. Since then, something interesting has happened: lawmakers, journalists and citizens are starting to talk seriously about the future of passenger trains in America. Many have been critical of the changes the president and I have proposed.
NEWS
October 11, 2012
Amtrak set another ridership record for the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, carrying 31.2 million passengers. Ridership was up 3.5 percent from the previous year, while ticket revenue grew by 6.8 percent to a record $2.02 billion. The ridership record was the ninth in the last 10 years. The national railroad, created in 1971 after private railroads went bankrupt, required a federal subsidy of $1.42 billion for operating costs, capital expenses and debt-service. That was down from $1.48 billion in 2011 and $1.57 billion in 2010.
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NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plans for expanded parking, higher platforms, improved waiting areas, and other upgrades at train stations along the 104-mile Keystone Corridor will move forward within the next few years, a Pennsylvania transportation representative said Friday. Five of the 12 train stations on the Keystone Corridor, which stretches from Harrisburg to Philadelphia, are in Chester County. "A lot of these stations, nothing has been done with them since my grandfather came home from World War II," said Jennie Granger, director of aviation at the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.
NEWS
October 13, 2014
If I hadn't been looking for "psychylustro" through the tinted windows of the Chestnut Hill West train, I would not have seen the helium balloon bucking at its tethers above the Philadelphia Zoo. I wouldn't have wondered about the skinny, leafless trees (like tinder, like wishbones) or imagined 19th-century factory girls behind the smashed windows of abandoned manufactories or reflected on Philadelphia's history as a generative incubator of modern graffiti. I wouldn't have thought about rail yard grass, either, or about how, despite every zooming, spewing, speeding thing, it grows.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Storm damage to Amtrak passenger-rail tunnels to New York City will cost more than $700 million to repair and force year-long closures of busy rail lines beneath the Hudson and East Rivers, according to an engineering report released Thursday. Repair work could force delays in passenger service along the entire Northeast Corridor between Boston and Washington. Water and salt damage caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 will require massive overhauls of the 104-year-old New York City tunnels, the report said.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
House leaders in Washington on Thursday introduced legislation to allow Amtrak to reinvest Northeast Corridor profits on improvements to the corridor, rather than to use that money to subsidize money-losing, long-distance routes in other parts of the country. The bill proposes many changes in how the national railroad is funded and how it operates. It was sponsored by top Republican and Democratic members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, giving it instant bipartisan support.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
ISSUE | 30TH STREET STATION Politicians shouldn't change station's name In reference to Karen Heller's column ("Gray Station not such a bright idea," Aug. 10), the controversy over Congress' high handed attempt to rename our city's iconic main railroad station continues unabated even though Congress itself escaped the heat of Washington immediately after passing this legislation. The interesting underlying fact is that the station is privately owned by a limited partnership created in the 1980s to take advantage of the generous tax credits that funded the restoration undertaken at that time.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak is investigating how an Acela Express train to Philadelphia and Washington left New York City's Penn Station without 85 passengers. The New York Daily News quoted one passenger as saying ticket holders were sent to the wrong platform, but Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz described the problem only as an apparent miscommunication "between the train crew and the station staff, which resulted in the train departing before all passengers could board....
BUSINESS
August 1, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak trains have been late nearly 30 percent of the time in the last 12 months, considerably worse than the year before. Part of the problem, Amtrak says, is that most of its routes operate on tracks owned and controlled by freight railroads. And a federal-court decision last year - which is now headed to the U.S. Supreme Court - undercut Amtrak's ability to compel freight operators to give priority to passenger trains. In the 12 months ending in June, only two of 33 Amtrak routes met the railroad's nationwide goal of 85.5 percent on-time performance.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Philadelphia's 30th Street Station is on its way to getting a new name. The city's rail hub would be renamed "William H. Gray III 30th Street Station" under a bill that passed the House on Monday in a voice vote. The plan would honor the late congressman, who long represented Philadelphia, secured millions of dollars in the 1980s to help renovate the station, and broke barriers as an African American. U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.), who succeeded Gray in Congress and sponsored the plan to change the name, said he hoped the Senate would pass the same bill this week, before lawmakers break for their summer recess.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak and California have ended their effort to jointly buy high-speed trains for the West Coast and the Northeast Corridor. A meeting with train manufacturers in Philadelphia this month convinced officials that the needs of the Northeast and California - including top speeds and route configurations - were just too different. The California High-Speed Rail Authority is planning to operate 220 m.p.h. trains on a newly built corridor between San Francisco and Los Angeles by 2029.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even as grand plans proceed for development around 30th Street Station, the iconic station will remain wrapped in scaffolding and netting for lack of funds for repairs, a top Amtrak official said Friday. A $60 million restoration project, to repair the 81-year-old station's limestone, clean its facade, and waterproof the exterior, is included in Amtrak's nationwide five-year plan for construction and repairs. But Congress has not authorized the money, and there is no indication when - or if - it will, Amtrak's chief of Northeast Corridor planning and performance, Drew Galloway, said Friday.
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