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BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Design consultants from around the world have been meeting with chiefs at Drexel University, Amtrak, Brandywine Realty Trust , and other local powers over the last couple of weeks to pitch competing development proposals they hope will help grow the neighborhood around 30th Street Station into a forest of high-rise towers and busy spaces. "We are in the process of determining and selecting a winning bid," Amtrak spokesman Craig Schulz told me. "My understanding is, we should have that process wrapped up in the next several weeks.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vice President Biden used a trip to 30th Street Station on Thursday to tout Amtrak's newest locomotive as an engine of the economy and a savior of middle-class jobs. The first of 70 new electric locomotives will begin revenue service Friday in Boston, pulling Amtrak coaches on the Northeast Corridor. Amtrak is spending $466 million on the new 125-m.p.h. locomotives, being built by the rail systems division of Siemens Industry Inc. in Sacramento, Calif. The new "Cities Sprinter" locomotives will replace models that are 25 to 35 years old. They eventually will power all Northeast Regional trains between Boston and Washington, and also will operate on the Keystone Corridor between Harrisburg, Philadelphia and New York.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
VICE PRESIDENT Joe Biden, a self-confessed railroad geek, strode to the podium at 30th Street Station yesterday to sing the praises of Amtrak's smart new electric locomotive - and quickly noticed that U.S. Rep. Bob Brady, Philly's Democratic Party chairman, was missing. "I don't know where the hell Brady is," Biden told the crowd in mock shock-and-awe. "Tell him I marked him 'absent.' " Then Biden, who U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx introduced as "president of the Amtrak fan club," launched into a riding-the-rails rap with the fervor of a man who made 7,000 round-trips between Washington and his Wilmington home during his 36 years in the Senate.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Top Amtrak officials collect salaries of $200,000 or more, according to records made public in response to Freedom of Information Act requests by The Inquirer. Amtrak, the taxpayer-subsidized national railroad, routinely refuses to divulge officials' salaries when it announces their hiring. Amtrak received about $1.3 billion in public money last year, including about $400 million for operating costs. These are the salaries of some officials hired in recent months, Amtrak disclosed in response to the newspaper's freedom-of-information requests: Gerald Sokol Jr., chief financial officer, $300,000.
NEWS
January 8, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Amtrak service between Philadelphia and Washington was disrupted Monday evening because of power-line problems in Wilmington that started around 6:15 p.m. and were continuing. Also, Amtrak announced it will reduce its Tuesday schedule between Washington and Boston because of the extreme cold moving into the region. Service finally resumed between Philadelphia and Washington around 11:30 p.m., though residual delays were expected, Amtrak announced via Twitter. The stoppage originally was between Philadelphia and Baltimore, but was extended to Washington because of the service backup.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Has Amtrak abandoned its vision of 220-mile-per-hour bullet trains speeding up and down the Northeast Corridor? The railroad recently issued draft specifications for new trains to replace its existing Acelas that call for 160 m.p.h. trains, not the 220 m.p.h. versions Amtrak said in January that it was seeking. Amtrak and the California High-Speed Rail Authority in January announced they were jointly seeking proposals for trains that could run at 220 miles an hour on the West Coast and the East Coast.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last of two articles. High-speed rail in the United States is closest to reality in California, but the nation's busiest rail route - the Northeast Corridor - is struggling just to keep the trains running as Amtrak pleads for money to eventually bring bullet trains to the Northeast. The 457-mile-long corridor between Washington and Boston carries 750,000 riders and 2,000 trains a day on an antiquated system prone to frequent failures and delays. And while California can largely start from scratch to build a high-speed line planned to connect Los Angeles and San Francisco by 2029 - though it must overcome legal and funding challenges, including a ruling this week stopping a bond sale - the corridor faces a daunting retrofit.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY HARRIS M. STEINBERG
THERE ARE 96 acres of prime real estate hiding in plain sight in the middle of our resurgent city. We scuttle past them every day by car or train. In a land-rich city like Philadelphia, it is often hard to see the treasures lying just beneath our feet. I'm talking about the rail yards at 30th Street. Bounded by the Schuylkill on the east, JFK Boulevard on the south, 32nd Street to the west and Spring Garden Street to the north, the rail yards are the most significant piece of real estate in the city.
BUSINESS
October 16, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak reported its highest-ever train ridership Monday: 31.6 million travelers took to the rails in the last 12 months, the 10th increase in 11 years. The previous record was 31.2 million riders in fiscal 2012. Ticket revenue rose to a record $2.1 billion from $2 billion the previous year. Ridership on Amtrak's busiest route, the Northeast Corridor - Washington to Boston through Philadelphia - was 11.4 million passengers, the second-best year ever, Amtrak said. Northeast Corridor traffic was strong in spite of serious service interruptions, including the flooding of tracks and tunnels caused by Sandy last October.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak is seeking redevelopment plans for 30th Street Station and the surrounding area, including the potentially lucrative air rights above the rail yards adjacent to the station. After several years of preparation, Amtrak announced Monday that it wants proposals for a master development plan delivered by Nov. 18. Amtrak is working with Drexel University and Brandywine Realty Trust to redevelop the 80-year-old station and its University City neighborhood. A coordinating committee of significant players, such as the University of Pennsylvania, SEPTA, and the city, also will be involved, Amtrak said.
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