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NEWS
June 10, 2015
ISSUE | EARLY LEARNING Role for mentors I worry when I hear about the city's efforts to expand early-childhood learning that we are heading toward a socialist state in which subsidized child care will remove poor children from their homes to get their mothers into the workforce and off the dole ("Nutter, Kenney trumpet early-childhood learning," June 3). If anything helps at-risk children living in poverty, it is good parenting and a sense of hope. Instead, we're told that the answer is more child learning centers, agencies, day cares, and pre-K.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday issued a preliminary report on the deadly crash of Amtrak 188, but did not reveal any new findings. The report does say that the crash - which killed eight passengers and injured more than 200 others - caused damages estimated by Amtrak in excess of $9.2 million. The NTSB, in releasing the report for a Tuesday hearing in Washington by the House transportation committee, reiterated the findings it reported earlier: - The seven-car train was traveling at 106 m.p.h.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Members of Congress pointedly questioned federal rail investigators Tuesday over why they still don't know whether the engineer operating Amtrak Train 188 was using his cellphone when it crashed in Philadelphia on May 12. Three weeks later, "I just don't understand what the holdup is," Rep. Barbara Comstock (R., Va.) said at the first congressional hearing into the derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Adding to lawmakers' frustration was that the National Transportation Safety Board has access to the engineer's cellphone and password, but has not nailed down an answer.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans plan to press Amtrak officials Tuesday on why the rail line did not move faster to install safety upgrades that could have stopped Train 188 before it derailed last month in Philadelphia. Among the key questions expected at a morning hearing on Capitol Hill - the first since the incident that killed eight passengers - are why Amtrak did not devote more resources to activate a new-age safety system, and why an older safety system was only in place on the southbound side of the curve in Port Richmond, and not the northbound side, where the train left the tracks.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The fatal derailment of Amtrak Train 188 in Philadelphia, which three weeks ago left eight people dead, has generated a lot of talk about more funding, reorganizing, or privatizing the nation's passenger rail service. But it's likely the talk will produce very little. Periodically, there is talk in Congress about privatizing at least the most successful portion of Amtrak - the 457-mile Northeast Corridor connecting Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston. But beyond loud speeches about Amtrak's many deficiencies, there is little movement to accomplish that goal.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188 in Philadelphia that left thousands of regional commuters scrambling for other transportation, airfares between New York and Washington seemed to skyrocket - coach fares between Washington Dulles and John F. Kennedy airports were going for $1,000 and more one way. A last-minute flight between Philadelphia International and New York LaGuardia airports was $537 each way for up to a week after the wreck...
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
AMTRAK PLANS to install internal cameras on its trains in the Northeast Corridor, allowing them to monitor train engineers, the corporation announced yesterday. The new safety measure follows the May 12 derailment of Amtrak Train 188, which left eight passengers dead and about 200 injured. An investigation led by the National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the train sped up from 70 to 102 mph as it approached a curve near Frankford Junction. A wide-angle camera will be added to each locomotive's cab, focusing on the engineer and the control console, Amtrak Spokesman Craig Schulz said.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scramble among personal-injury lawyers for clients in the catastrophic Amtrak crash is on. Law firms have held news conferences, advertised on the Internet, and issued news releases. Others with long records of representing clients in train and car wrecks instead are relying on networks of lawyers who refer clients or simply waiting for clients to find them on their own. "There is a lot of competition," said Nancy Winkler, of Eisenberg Rothweiler Winkler Eisenberg & Jeck P.C., and a past president of the Philadelphia Trial Lawyers Association.
NEWS
May 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to last week's deadly wreck of Amtrak Train 188, the Federal Railroad Administration on Thursday ordered Amtrak to improve safety on the Northeast Corridor's dangerous curves. The FRA's emergency order requires Amtrak to identify within five days all curves on the Boston-to-Washington corridor where there is a drop of more than 20 m.p.h. in the speed limit from the approaching straightaway. Then Amtrak must install an automatic control system that would slow speeding trains at the identified curves, or come up with an acceptable alternative.
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