CollectionsAmtrak
IN THE NEWS

Amtrak

BUSINESS
May 20, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Four Amtrak passengers sued the railroad company Monday in federal court in Philadelphia for injuries suffered in Tuesday's crash of Train 188, alleging the rail line failed to install an automatic-braking system on a dangerous curve where the train derailed. One of the passengers, Felicidad Redondo Iban, a Spanish tourist, was pinned under a car and since has had multiple surgeries to save a nearly severed right arm from amputation. "It is utterly inexplicable to me that someone would accelerate into a sharp curve, unless they were not paying attention or that they believed they had already gone through the curve and were accelerating into a straightaway," said personal injury lawyer, Robert Mongeluzzi, who filed the suit.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
PERHAPS the passengers who board Amtrak's trains today and travel along the Northeast Corridor won't look out the window as they pass the curve in Frankford where Train 188 derailed Tuesday, killing eight passengers. Maybe they'll be on their phones. Or with their heads buried in work. Life is busy. Life moves on. But Philadelphia will always see the spot where Train 188 derailed as hallowed ground, and people here won't forget the lives lost and the courage shown when we looked out our windows and saw a national tragedy in our back yard.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Laura Finamore, Jim Gaines, Abid Gilani, Robert Gildersleeve, Derrick E. Griffith, Rachel Jacobs, Giuseppe Piras, Justin Zemser. As each name was read, a bell rang out and white dove of peace was released into the afternoon sky. Dozens of first responders, volunteers, neighbors as well as city, state, and federal officials gathered Sunday near the site of Tuesday's Amtrak derailment for a service of remembrance and reflection for those who...
NEWS
May 19, 2015
City, state and federal leaders will gather at Frankford Junction, the site of the derailment of Amtrak Train 188, for a service of reflection at 5 p.m. Sunday. Gov. Tom Wolf, Mayor Nutter and U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx will be joined by U.S. Rep. Bob Brady and by Sen. Tom Carper of Delaware, in remembering the eight people who were killed in the May 12 crash at Frankford Avenue and Wheatsheaf Lane in Port Richmond. Amtrak chief executive Joseph Boardman and Renee Cardwell Hughes, chief executive of the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania, will also be in attendance.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amtrak service on the Northeast Corridor will resume Monday morning, according to a statement from the railroad. "Effective with departures from Philadelphia at 5:53 a.m. (Train 110) and New York City at 5:30 a.m. (Train 111), all Amtrak Acela Express, Northeast Regional and other services resume," the statement read. SEPTA's Trenton regional rail service, which operates on Amtrak rails, will also resume on Monday, SEPTA officials announced.. "Due to an anticipated reduction in the number of operating tracks, inbound trains (to Center City)
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Mabin Sr. has worked on railroad equipment for four decades. He's never fulfilled an order like the one he received Thursday. Following the crash of Amtrak Train 188, the agency needed two new catenary portal structures at Frankford Junction to get its Northeast Corridor service operational again. The tall steel structures hold the overhead wires above rail lines. Each one requires about 15 tons of metal. Typically, they take at least six weeks to create. Amtrak asked Mabin if his company could build two in three days.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed and Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writers
The National Transportation Safety Board says the engineer of the doomed Amtrak Train 188 apparently did not radio his dispatchers that his train had been hit by a projectile just before it careened off the tracks at the Frankford curve in Port Richmond. A review of taped conversations by the engineer, Brandon Bostian, to dispatchers shows no mention of anything hitting his train, as one of his assistant conductors has reported. NTSB's Robert Sumwalt, the lead investigator of the fatal derailment, said the Amtrak dispatchers were also interviewed about a possible report of a projectile impact.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Paul Nussbaum, and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The Federal Railroad Administration ordered Amtrak on Saturday to immediately install an electronic braking system at the Frankford curve that - if it had been in place last week - likely would have prevented the train derailment that killed eight people and injured more than 200. Amtrak officials said the system would be in place by the time the damaged line is reopened, perhaps as early as Tuesday, and "most certainly will be safer. " Service between Philadelphia and New York remains suspended through Monday, affecting thousands of commuters.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | BECKY BATCHA
FOLLOWING A house fire, a hurricane, a catastrophic train wreck, volunteers and staff from the Red Cross materialize - seemingly out of thin air - to help victims back on their feet. "We address all those human needs that restore your dignity to you," says judge Renee Cardwell Hughes, CEO at the American Red Cross of Eastern Pennsylvania. Within hours after Tuesday night's Amtrak derailment, her people had manned two help centers for passengers and their worried families, one at 30th Street Station and another at Webster Elementary on Frankford Avenue.
NEWS
May 16, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ER was already busy, close to full - gunshots, car wrecks, strokes - when the "get ready" call came in at 9:45 p.m. By 10:30, they began arriving by police car, ambulance, anything. By midnight, 54 had made it to Temple University Hospital, which treated more passengers from Amtrak's Tuesday night disaster than any other emergency room. The most critical patients were rushed into one of the three trauma bays just inside the ER door. Teams of doctors and nurses were assigned to each bay, responsible for stabilizing patients and moving them through with skill and speed, making room for the next.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|