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Amy Carter

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NEWS
April 18, 1987
So Amy Carter and aging yippie Abbie Hoffman have beat the rap in the Berkshires. They claimed it was the CIA that was the lawbreaker, not the protesters - a feisty bunch who got in the way of the CIA's campus recruiting at the University of Massachusetts. Lord knows, campus recruiting is the least of the CIA's sins, and you'll get no argument here that the intelligence agency should be barred from scouring academe for all the talent it can sign up. And the acquittal for Amy and Abbie and their fellows may well have hinged less on their act of conscience than the jury's belief that they really weren't trespassing since their protest took place in public areas.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
For her, this is a cause. And because of it, she endures the camera flashes that threaten to blind, the television microphones that seem to swoop down every time she and her compatriots confer with their attorneys. "I hate dealing with the press," she said. "But I think it is a necessary evil. " Amy Carter may well be the first president's daughter ever to face trial and the threat of jail because of crimes against the state. Yesterday, in mini-skirt and flannel lumberman's jacket, she leaned against the century-old courthouse where her case is being tried and contemplated why. "I'd say I've always been aware of issues, living in my house," said the youngest child of Jimmy Carter, who made human rights the issue of his presidency.
NEWS
April 5, 1987 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not every day does a former president's daughter get arrested with a 1960s- era activist 31 years her senior, vow to turn their misdemeanor charges into a trial against the state and find former intelligence agents and foreign revolutionaries who will help. Such is the stuff of high drama, and tomorrow that drama - with Amy Carter and Abbie Hoffman at its center - will come to a century-old courthouse on the picturesque edge of the Berkshire hills in western Massachusetts. For the Hampshire County prosecutor, it's a simple case of trespassing and disorderly conduct: Protesting students enter building at University of Massachusetts.
LIVING
September 16, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains material contributed by the Associated Press, the New York Post, the New York Times, the Washington Post and USA Today
Former first daughter Amy Carter will marry Michael Antonucci, 27, of Atlanta, next summer. No other details available accept that her parents, Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, in Washington for the Mideast peace agreement signing, were telling friends that their daughter intends to make her wedding dress. Carter, 25, who attended Brown University and the Memphis College of Art, has consistently refused all media requests for interviews. COUPLES II Geena Davis and Cliffhanger director Renny Harlin will wed Saturday, says Variety.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this report.)
Amy Carter returned to the state of the crime yesterday when she joined about 100 demonstrators protesting CIA recruiting at a federal building in Springfield, Mass. Some of the protesters were with the ex-president's daughter when she was arrested with 14 others last Nov. 24 at another CIA protest in nearby Amherst. Twenty-two protesters were arrested yesterday, but Carter wasn't among them. She refused to talk about her involvement, saying she was just visiting. "It's not my place; it's not my protest," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1987 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
What is it about Amy Carter that makes people pick on her? Not even that glorified Boy Scout, Roger Staubach, could resist spitballing her on national television ("My daughter, Amy, knows as much about football as Amy Carter does about nuclear proliferation. ") Of course that quote, like all the other abuse, was meant for her father. That's no excuse either. One recalls, for instance, the 1980 Democratic convention. No Democrat had worse feelings towards then-president Carter than U.S. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D., Mass.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | BY MARY MCGRORY
Some people look at Amy Carter, the presidential daughter at the barricades, and say, "showoff. " But others who have been following her progress in a Northampton, Mass., courtroom, where she has been acquitted on charges of disorderly conduct and trespassing, say, "At last, a committed college student. " Amy Carter, a 19-year-old Brown University sophomore, was arrested in last November for her part in an anti-CIA sit-in and demonstration on the campus of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
THE LITTLE BABY SNOOGLE-FLEEJER Jimmy Carter - Illustrated by Amy Carter (Random House / $17) Some found Jimmy Carter tough to like as a president, but it's hard not to love the guy in his post-White House roles as diplomat, humanitarian and Habitat homebuilder. Carter further endears himself with the public with his 10th book, which is his first children's effort. Carter collaborates with youngest child Amy on the overpriced but delightful "The Little Baby Snoogle-Fleejer.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
It's tough being 12 years old, tougher still when everyone's watching. Chelsea Clinton, welcome to the world of being First Kid. You haven't even got the title yet, but already you're the subject of national scrutiny. Until the Democratic National Convention, we rarely saw you on the campaign trail. Then, suddenly, you're on the podium. On the cover of People. Being photographed at Planet Hollywood with Arnold Schwarzenegger, a well-known Republican. You're spotted at "The Secret Garden" and "Phantom of the Opera.
NEWS
December 17, 1986 | By Richard Cohen
In 1968, students at Columbia University demonstrated against the presence of Marine recruiters on campus, ultimately forcing the Marines to beat one of their rare retreats. As a student, I watched the demonstration until the bile rose within me. Then, in fury, I denounced the demonstrators to a friend until I was told that my position was politically incorrect. I was, after all, opposed to the Vietnam War. Oh. But my position was not politically incorrect and now, almost 20 years later, I have the opportunity to restate it. The occasion is the arrest of Amy Carter among others for a University of Massachusetts sit-in to protest Central Intelligence Agency recruiting.
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LIVING
July 31, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amy Carter has given birth to a baby boy, the 10th grandchild of former President Jimmy Carter, 74, and his wife Rosalynn. Hugo James Wentzel was born Thursday about 9 p.m., weighing 7 pounds 13 ounces and measuring 20 inches. Both mother and child were doing fine, Carrie Harmon, a spokeswoman for the Carter Center, said yesterday. Carter, 31, and her husband of three years, James Wentzel, live in Atlanta near the Carter Center, where she was elected to the board of councilors in March 1998.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The students took the stage at Pickering Manor Home, in Newtown, looked down at the rows of residents in wheelchairs, and momentarily forgot their instructions to smile. Shy grins replaced their concerned and nervous looks, though, when someone in the audience of elderly residents called out: "Sure a good-looking bunch. " The students from Makefield Elementary School then launched into a 15-minute program of Christmas and Hanukkah songs, interrupted by soft applause. When the students were finished and walked in to the audience to mingle, the 30 or so residents brightened.
LIVING
August 30, 1996 | By W. Speers Inquirer staff writer Michael Klein contributed to this article. The article also contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, the Washington Post and USA Today
Roger Moore, addressing the first World Congress Against Commercial Sexual Exploi-tation of Children yesterday in Stockholm, told of how a pedophile came on to him at a Cub Scouts trip when he was 8. "He sort of said I had nice knees, which I thought was a bit peculiar," the actor said. "I left the tent and I was sitting on a branch, and after a couple of minutes he came out and he made another suggestive remark about my anatomy. . . . He made a grab and I just rolled backwards over the branch and ran off. " Speaking as a UNICEF goodwill ambassador, Moore, 68, said the incident influenced his decision to work for children's rights.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | by Yvonne Dennis, Daily News Staff Writer
THE LITTLE BABY SNOOGLE-FLEEJER Jimmy Carter - Illustrated by Amy Carter (Random House / $17) Some found Jimmy Carter tough to like as a president, but it's hard not to love the guy in his post-White House roles as diplomat, humanitarian and Habitat homebuilder. Carter further endears himself with the public with his 10th book, which is his first children's effort. Carter collaborates with youngest child Amy on the overpriced but delightful "The Little Baby Snoogle-Fleejer.
LIVING
March 29, 1994 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, New York Post, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times and USA Today
Tickets to Barbra Streisand's three June dates at Madison Square Garden sold out in 20 minutes Sunday. Two more dates were added. Those tickets were gone 30 minutes later. People had been lined up outside the Garden since Thursday. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the ducats were sold there. The huge majority were sold through Ticketmaster. Top price was $350 each, but soon after the sellout was declared they were being scalped for twice that. Indeed, the quarter-million tickets to all 18 of Streisand's gigs this spring in four U.S. cities were gone in less than an hour.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer The San Francisco Chronicle, Washington Post, New York Times and Penthouse magazine contributed to this report
"What we have here is a serious problem with handling anger. " - Howard Markman, author of "We Can Work It Out: Making Sense of Marital Conflict," commenting on the Bobbitt case. WOMEN WHO DIDN'T MEASURE UP McCall's magazine, not content with fattening us up for the holidays and trimming us down in January, has compiled a list of "Five Women Who've Let Us Down:" Marilyn Quayle for touting the "essential nature" of a woman's desire to stay home with the kids, but returning to work full time soon as she left the limelight.
LIVING
September 16, 1993 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains material contributed by the Associated Press, the New York Post, the New York Times, the Washington Post and USA Today
Former first daughter Amy Carter will marry Michael Antonucci, 27, of Atlanta, next summer. No other details available accept that her parents, Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter, in Washington for the Mideast peace agreement signing, were telling friends that their daughter intends to make her wedding dress. Carter, 25, who attended Brown University and the Memphis College of Art, has consistently refused all media requests for interviews. COUPLES II Geena Davis and Cliffhanger director Renny Harlin will wed Saturday, says Variety.
NEWS
May 10, 1993 | By MOLLY IVINS
Once upon a midnight dreary, as I staggered weak and weary, out from under 27 pounds of analysis of Bill Clinton's first 100 days, it occurred to me that I actually had read something new in there. I raced back to Time magazine's exegesis of Hillary Rodham Clinton's first 100 days and sure enough, there it was: A Republican consultant told a network newscaster that his job was to make sure Hillary Clinton is discredited before the 1996 campaign. Each day, anti- Hillary talking points go out to talk-show hosts.
NEWS
November 18, 1992 | by Samantha Meinetz Shapiro, From the New York Times
I am feeling a little post-election smugness because I endorsed Clinton early on. When I say Clinton, I mean it in the loosest way. Actually, I mean Chelsea, and her father only in the sense that if he raised her he's got something good going on there. It doesn't matter whom I endorsed, of course, because I'm too young to vote. Because of this minor hindrance, it's dubious that any president will directly champion my interests or even understand what they are. Politicians' ideas of youth are limited to an amorphous rhetorical device, a first cousin of "the future," if you will.
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