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NEWS
July 14, 1996 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When the region north and west of Philadelphia was considered a frontier and its streams were pristine, it was not uncommon for those streams to be used for the sacrament of adult baptism. On the banks of fast-flowing creeks such as the Indian or the Wissahickon, small groups of the plain-clothed, German-speaking Ana-baptist sect would totally immerse one of their adult members into the Kingdom of God. Members of the sect were formally called the Brethren. But because of their beliefs in immersion for baptism, they were popularly called Dunkers, a term of derision that they embraced.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County judge yesterday wanted to lock up a convicted sex offender with ties to the Amish community and hide the key. But President Judge Howard F. Riley Jr. found himself constrained by the very people he wanted to protect. Mindful that the Amish take pains to avoid the court system, and that the victims in the case did not want to testify, Riley sentenced 68-year-old John Benjamin Fisher of Morgantown to 18 to 36 months in state prison, accepting the terms of a plea agreement.
NEWS
October 3, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amish schools, like most aspects of Amish life, remain today as they have been for generations. Even the school shootings around the country have had little effect. School doors are commonly unlocked during the school day, said Stephen Scott, research assistant at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College. The schools themselves are one-room affairs with outdoor bathrooms, and have many windows to let in the sunlight, since there is no electricity.
NEWS
October 3, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With its rolling dairy farms and slow-moving buggies, Bart Township typifies Amish country. "We're just a quiet little village area getting national attention we don't want," Val Keene, the secretary-treasurer of Bart Township, said yesterday, weary of calls from across the nation and even one from England seeking information about the shooting of 11 girls, three fatally, at a school in the rural community. Earlier, she had appeared as a guest on a London talk show, she said. "We're a very conservative community," Keene said.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1993 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Wearing brightly colored, African-style dashikis, kente cloth caps and high-heeled pumps, they hardly looked like what most people think of when they think of Mennonites. But there they sat yesterday, in the front row of the general meeting of the Mennonite Church convention at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The event, which ends Sunday, officially got under way yesterday. To many outsiders, Mennonites conjure up images of white women in plain dresses and wearing small white caps.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Mennonite-owned cabinetmaker has filed a federal suit charging that the Affordable Care Act's mandate on contraception coverage violates its constitutional rights. Conestoga Wood Specialties, citing the principles of religious freedom on which William Penn founded Pennsylvania, says in its suit, filed in U.S. District Court, that to accord to its Mennonite beliefs, it would be "sinful and immoral for the company to participate in, pay for, facilitate or otherwise support any contraception" that would have the effect of an abortion.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two hundred seventy-five years. Pastor Jay Garber cast his eyes out across his congregation, and, in the humble way characteristic of his faith, attempted to put it all in perspective. Yes, they were meeting in a church built by many of their forebears. Yes, they were worshiping on land in this rural Lancaster County community donated by their ancestors for that very purpose long before much of the country was even settled. And yes, many of the classic, popular old hymns they were singing - "Oh Worship the King," written in 1833, for instance - came along well after the congregation itself was established.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the year after the Year of the Woman, Donella M. Clemens is easing her way into the role of historic symbol. No fanfare. No bold pronouncements. No radical agenda to make the establishment quake. Just Donella Clemens of Souderton, homemaker, mother of three, all-purpose volunteer. And - now that you mention it - the first woman ever to be elected moderator of the Mennonite Church. No burden there, Clemens said. "I'd worked through that when I told the nominating committee that I'd be available for the position," said Clemens, who is an elder at Souderton Mennonite Church and who was chosen for the two-year denominational leadership post at the recent biennial meeting in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the early part of the 20th century, Ann J. Allebach became the first woman to be ordained a Mennonite minister. She brought to her calling the Mennonite tradition of education and social work, but her achievements were outside her native area. After Allebach's death, the local Mennonite community "did not quite know what to make of this woman so unlike her kind. " The files of the Mennonite Heritage Center in Harleysville report that Allebach was born in Green Lane in 1874 to Jacob and Sarah Markley Allebach.
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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Mennonite-owned cabinetmaker has filed a federal suit charging that the Affordable Care Act's mandate on contraception coverage violates its constitutional rights. Conestoga Wood Specialties, citing the principles of religious freedom on which William Penn founded Pennsylvania, says in its suit, filed in U.S. District Court, that to accord to its Mennonite beliefs, it would be "sinful and immoral for the company to participate in, pay for, facilitate or otherwise support any contraception" that would have the effect of an abortion.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
* BREAKING AMISH. 10 p.m. Sunday, TLC. ANYONE WHO THINKS a TV-free household is the answer to keeping kids from following in Snooki's shaky footsteps might want to take a lesson from the Amish, for whom "reality" television's become a plague their Anabaptist ancestors couldn't anticipate. Turns out it's not all that easy to keep some of them, at least, down on the farm once there's a video camera in their faces. On Sunday, TLC's "Breaking Amish" becomes the latest show to try to document what happens when a small group of young people brought up for the most part without electricity - or even zippers - moves to the big city.
NEWS
October 3, 2006 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With its rolling dairy farms and slow-moving buggies, Bart Township typifies Amish country. "We're just a quiet little village area getting national attention we don't want," Val Keene, the secretary-treasurer of Bart Township, said yesterday, weary of calls from across the nation and even one from England seeking information about the shooting of 11 girls, three fatally, at a school in the rural community. Earlier, she had appeared as a guest on a London talk show, she said. "We're a very conservative community," Keene said.
NEWS
October 3, 2006 | By Kellie Patrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Amish schools, like most aspects of Amish life, remain today as they have been for generations. Even the school shootings around the country have had little effect. School doors are commonly unlocked during the school day, said Stephen Scott, research assistant at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College. The schools themselves are one-room affairs with outdoor bathrooms, and have many windows to let in the sunlight, since there is no electricity.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | By Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 3:15 a.m., the only light comes from a window in the barn. Chris Powell, with big shoulders, is loading the last of the vegetable and fruit boxes onto the truck. The market will open at six. No time to waste. This morning, he's got the first strawberries of the season. It's only the third Saturday in May, but his fields near Strasburg in Lancaster County are exploding with spinach, rhubarb, asparagus, sugar peas, radishes, lettuce, green onions, herbs and Swiss chard. The crunch of car wheels on gravel announces the arrival of helpers.
NEWS
December 5, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Chester County judge yesterday wanted to lock up a convicted sex offender with ties to the Amish community and hide the key. But President Judge Howard F. Riley Jr. found himself constrained by the very people he wanted to protect. Mindful that the Amish take pains to avoid the court system, and that the victims in the case did not want to testify, Riley sentenced 68-year-old John Benjamin Fisher of Morgantown to 18 to 36 months in state prison, accepting the terms of a plea agreement.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
From back in the late 1880s, there are eyewitness reports of a line of horses and wagons stretching out for a half-mile before converging on the Indian Creek Brethren Meetinghouse. In those conveyances were members of Church of the Brethren congregations in Montgomery, Bucks, Berks and Lancaster Counties. According to the reports, collected in an oral history compiled by local historian Clarence Kulp, the travelers were on their way to Indian Creek to celebrate a weekend Love Feast.
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stroking his snowy stalactite of a beard, Clarence Schrock narrowed his eyes under his broad-brimmed hat, studied the yellow disks scattered across the shuffleboard court, then succumbed to an athletic impulse not even a good Amishman could resist: trash talk. "Oh, I'm going to raise Cain on my last shot," he announced to no one in particular, with a smile and the tug of a suspender. "Just you watch. " And one would watch - if one were not so busy staring open-mouthed at the boy out in the road, in dark pants and suspenders, pedaling his bicycle barefoot under the palm trees.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In the early part of the 20th century, Ann J. Allebach became the first woman to be ordained a Mennonite minister. She brought to her calling the Mennonite tradition of education and social work, but her achievements were outside her native area. After Allebach's death, the local Mennonite community "did not quite know what to make of this woman so unlike her kind. " The files of the Mennonite Heritage Center in Harleysville report that Allebach was born in Green Lane in 1874 to Jacob and Sarah Markley Allebach.
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