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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Murphy Guyer has a terrific ear. In Rendezvous With Reality, his new comedy at the Wilma Theater, he unerringly reproduces both the naive jargon of New Age idealism and the defensive ranting of right-wing extremism. If mimicry were all there were to playwriting, he'd be home free. It isn't and he's not, but there's still a lot to like before the moment of reckoning arrives. The play proceeds from a simple what-if: What if a pair of human-potential nuts were to crash-land their Cessna in the Idaho wilderness and stumble into a den of yahoos led by a dangerous anarchist?
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Massages were available upstairs, training for police confrontations on the ground floor. Tacos for 4,000 were being prepared in the courtyard. The media guy for the anarchists was out front, explaining why anarchists can have a media guy and still be anarchists. And there was the resident beat poet, Diamond Dave Whitaker, 66, who was holding court in a circle of chairs behind some police tape wrapped around trees, talking about the good old days with Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | By Trudy Rubin
A new kind of terrorism is threatening the West. Freelance terrorism. Terrorists have become more individualistic, more amorphous, harder to pin down. No longer does the biggest danger come from a network of nationalist guerrilla movements and far-left gangs trained and funded by communist states and their Mideast allies. In the postcommunist era, terrorism has been privatized. Those who exploded a bomb in Atlanta and (probably) on TWA Flight 800 represent this unnerving trend.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Five men suspected of plotting to bomb an Ohio bridge were indicted Thursday on three counts each, including a new charge of attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction to destroy property in interstate commerce. The indictment was announced by U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach, who said the men also were charged with conspiracy and attempted use of an explosive device to destroy property in interstate commerce. The men could face life in prison if convicted of trying to bomb the soaring bridge over the Cuyahoga Valley National Park at Brecksville, south of Cleveland.
NEWS
July 24, 2000 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sean Damon is a soldier in the anticapitalist revolution. A self-proclaimed anarchist from West Philadelphia, he believes in free thought, personal autonomy and direct democracy - not chaos. He favors dark-colored T-shirts with slogans - not a shaved head, pierced body parts or a bad attitude. And yet, Damon concedes in his mild-mannered way, that is how outsiders perceive those, like him, who are part of what he calls "the revolution. " As "the revolution" prepares to hit the streets of Philadelphia in the form of protests and demonstrations during the Republican National Convention next week, local anarchists who plan to participate say their movement has been misrepresented and their views misunderstood.
NEWS
May 28, 1995 | By Claudio G. Segre
What's so nerve-racking about the Oklahoma City bombers is that they don't fit, they're outside the game, and the "message" that cost the lives of so many innocents remains hopelessly garbled. Most newspapers and commentators describe the alleged bombers as members of the "far right. " Far aright of what? I say. Does that make them anarchists? Or fascists? In whose tradition? In what context? For example, the bombers appear to be anti-government, so are they anarchists? Do they, as some commentators have suggested, fit into that old and recognizable American and European tradition that stretches back into the 19th century?
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clarence Knepp stood and stared, stunned. Sixty yards away, a lithe young woman danced in front of the Friends Select School, twirling flags and almost defying gravity. She pivoted on trained toes, spinning like an angel and screaming like a demon. We must be freeeeeeeee! Or we will perish! The shriek banged around buildings at 17th Street and the Parkway. It reached Knepp, who almost winced. "She must be freaking out," Knepp said yesterday. A Montgomery, Ind., visitor, Knepp shook his head.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The anarchists marched on City Hall again Monday, led by a young puppet builder who got busted at the Republican National Convention. This time they took to the streets for the 2001 Mummers Parade. Nobody got arrested, but the troupe was disqualified for commercialization. The group's skit protested a new McDonald's at 43rd and Market streets which has drawn neighborhood ire. Ironically, they used the logo they equate with corporate greed - a no-no in the Mummers rulebook.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Cynthia Burton and Toni Locy contributed to this report.)
All day long, the people climbed the steps to America's Soapbox. They pounded the pine podium, thrust their fists into the air, opened their mouths angrily - and stood frozen in silence while friends took their snapshots. The soapbox scene at the Visitors Center in Independence National Historical Park characterized a lack of unified protest amid the official celebrations yesterday. The thousands thronging the historic district seemed too busy cheering and cavorting to question the health of the guest of honor, the U.S. Constitution.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Occupy National Gathering's information desk, where someone might go to ask why a meeting scheduled for 5 p.m. had not yet started at 7, a sign read, "Whenever it starts is the right time. " Among the roughly 200 protesters who gathered from Occupy sites nationwide, no one seemed bothered by the delay in the final meeting Wednesday, where they were to hear the completed vision list drafted in small groups that day. The protesters spent most of the holiday in Franklin Square debating items to include on the list, leaving them largely out of the sight of tourists traipsing Independence Mall.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Five men suspected of plotting to bomb an Ohio bridge were indicted Thursday on three counts each, including a new charge of attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction to destroy property in interstate commerce. The indictment was announced by U.S. Attorney Steven Dettelbach, who said the men also were charged with conspiracy and attempted use of an explosive device to destroy property in interstate commerce. The men could face life in prison if convicted of trying to bomb the soaring bridge over the Cuyahoga Valley National Park at Brecksville, south of Cleveland.
NEWS
November 28, 2011 | BY WILL BUNCH & JULIE SHAW, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
EIGHT WEEKS AGO tonight, more than 1,000 Philadelphians packed a church on North Broad Street with this crazy idealistic notion that an open-ended campout at City Hall could mark the beginning of the end for rampant income inequality and corporate greed. They were schoolteachers and the hopelessly unemployed, Quakers and anarchists - all agreeing with 69-year-old Carol Finkle, who told a reporter: "This is the first time in my adult life I feel there's some hope. " Last night, on an unseasonably balmy evening that recalled those first hopeful nights of an American Autumn at 15th and Market, hundreds from Occupy Philly rallied one more time - this time ringed by police officers and a police wagon that signaled the imminent end of their fall encampment.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By WILLIAM C. KASHATUS
ON THE EVE of the American Revolution, Britain's North American colonists were divided over the issue of independence. A third favored separation from England. Another third opposed it, and yet another third was indifferent, believing that the issue didn't affect them. That changed in January 1776 with the publication of Thomas Paine's "Common Sense. " The 47-page pamphlet served as a lightning rod for American independence by mobilizing the masses for revolution. But Paine's volatile rhetoric and his controversial background prevented historians from recognizing his significant contribution as a Founding Father until two centuries later.
NEWS
January 6, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
To those who haven't been properly introduced, or who've only seen it on the fly, the stretch of Baltimore Avenue that approaches 50th Street in West Philadelphia is not quick to reveal its quirky charm. Rosemarie Certo admits to being guilty on both counts. Offered space to open a brewpub at this western edge of Cedar Park, she balked: "It was too far. " Too far from what? "Too far from 46th and Baltimore," which was about as far as she saw commercial possibility. She has come to adjust her view since, saying she has discovered profound value in the racial mix, arts scene, and political consciousness (ranging from prisoner-advocate vegan anarchists to establishmentarian Penn profs)
NEWS
March 18, 2005 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The title characters of the kidcom The Suite Life of Zack & Cody, which debuts at 7 tonight on the Disney Channel, are a rambunctious pair of 11-year-olds who live in Boston's swankiest hotel. What a life. Finger sandwiches in the lobby, hot- and cold-running everything, ice cream served poolside every afternoon punctually at 4. What did these rapscallions, played by unspeakably cute twins Dylan and Cole Sprouse, do to deserve this luxe existence? Their mom (Kim Rhodes) is the musical headliner at the joint.
NEWS
August 31, 2004 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Massages were available upstairs, training for police confrontations on the ground floor. Tacos for 4,000 were being prepared in the courtyard. The media guy for the anarchists was out front, explaining why anarchists can have a media guy and still be anarchists. And there was the resident beat poet, Diamond Dave Whitaker, 66, who was holding court in a circle of chairs behind some police tape wrapped around trees, talking about the good old days with Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan.
NEWS
August 26, 2004 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER NATIONAL STAFF
Bracing for the twin threats of violent street protests and terrorism, a massive, heavily armed police force is moving into place in New York to protect the Republican convention set to open Monday. Officials promise the lockdown won't prevent large crowds of demonstrators from having their say. Activists aren't so sure. Already, antiwar groups have been barred from Central Park because the city says they would ruin the grass. Even by New York's super-sized standards, the number of demonstrators is expected to be large, fueled in particular by passions over the war in Iraq.
NEWS
February 4, 2002 | MICHELLE MALKIN
AS IF New Yorkers don't already have enough to deal with, they have been forced to endure the presence of the pie-throwing, critter-liberating, bomb-building, arson-setting, spell-casting, utensil-stealing cop-haters wearing puppet heads. This disruptive freak show was part of something called the "Anti-Capitalist Convergence. " New York City police were forced to contend with the threat of these protesters as they descended on the global economic forum that ended yesterday. In the wake of the 1999 Seattle World Trade Organization riots and under the shadow of the Sept.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | By Monica Yant Kinney, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like patriotic postal carriers, Tim and Kelley Flannery made their pledge: Neither rain nor sleet nor snow - not even pesky protesters - would keep them from watching the inaugural parade yesterday. After all, the Flannerys came all the way from Houston, where Tim works at NASA and happens to be a political appointee of a certain former governor named Bush. The Flannerys weren't going to let a little thing like finger-freezing temperatures, wicked wind, and bone-soaking rain keep them from hollering a Texas-size howdy to the nation's new president.
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