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NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scientist had traveled from Germany to examine the ancient items that lay before him on the University of Pennsylvania laboratory table, and he was dazzled. Earrings with cascades of golden leaves. Brooches adorned with tightly coiled spirals. A necklace strung with hundreds of gold ringlets and beads. The jewelry bore a striking resemblance to objects from one of the world's great collections - a controversial treasure unearthed long ago from the fabled city of Troy. Were the objects on the lab table also from the city that inspired Homer's epic poem of war?
NEWS
April 3, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Peter D. Harrison was writing the last chapter of his latest book, he was sitting near a hotel swimming pool on the edge of the ancient Mayan city of Tikal. "And there were howler monkeys in the trees," the New Mexico anthropologist, 62, said in an interview, "and they didn't stop all afternoon. " And all night. While the monkeys threaten visitors, he said, the 35,000 tourists at Tikal, Guatemala, each year threaten the ecological balance in the city that was hidden by jungle for almost 1,000 years.
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scientist had traveled from Germany to examine the ancient items that lay before him on the University of Pennsylvania laboratory table, and he was dazzled. Earrings with cascades of golden leaves. Brooches adorned with tightly coiled spirals. A necklace strung with hundreds of gold ringlets and beads. The jewelry bore a striking resemblance to objects from one of the world's great collections - a controversial treasure unearthed long ago from the fabled city of Troy. Were the objects on the lab table also from the city that inspired Homer's epic poem of war?
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
PETRA, Jordan - President Obama set aside the Middle East's tricky politics Saturday to marvel at the beauty of one of the region's most stunning sites, the fabled ancient city of Petra. "This is pretty spectacular," he said, craning his neck to gaze up at the rock faces after emerging from a narrow pathway into a sun-splashed plaza in front of the grand Treasury. The soaring facade is considered the masterpiece of the ancient city carved into the rose-red stone by the Nabataeans more than 2,000 years ago. Obama's turn as tourist capped a four-day visit to the Middle East that included stops in Israel and the West Bank, as well Jordan.
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
VALENCIA, Spain - This ancient city on Spain's Mediterranean coast has long drawn visitors to its UNESCO-cited, late Gothic silk exchange; its restored modernist central market; its plenitude of paella restaurants; and its old-fashioned cafes serving horchata , or chilled tiger-nut milk, a smooth and refreshing local specialty. But in recent years, it's a futuristic attraction more so than the historical and culinary ones that has landed Valencia on various travel publications' must-see lists.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the casualties of Syria's civil war is history. Five of the country's six World Heritage sites have "significant damage" and some buildings have been "reduced to rubble," according to a new report that includes work by University of Pennsylvania experts. The report, which was released this week, relied on high-resolution satellite photos to chronicle damage to mosques, Roman buildings, and a Byzantine castle. The Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project of the American Association for the Advancement of Science wrote the assessment with help from the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Syrian Heritage Task Force.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Maggie Michael and Haggag Salama, Associated Press
LUXOR, Egypt - Angry tourism workers and activists in Luxor threatened Monday to block a newly appointed Islamist governor from his office because of his links to a former militant group that killed scores of people in a 1997 attack in the ancient city and devastated Egypt's sightseeing industry. Adel el-Khayat was named to the provincial governor's post Sunday by President Mohammed Morsi, causing the outrage. Khayat is a member of the Construction and Development party, the political arm of Gamaa Islamiya, which waged an armed insurgency against the state starting in 1992 and attacked police, Coptic Christians, and tourists.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By JOHN R. COHN
THIS MONTH, Berlin will mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the city's infamous wall. Made of stark concrete and barbed wire, and dotted with watchtowers, it divided the heart of Berlin into eastern and western sectors. Hundreds died there trying to cross into freedom. Berlin became a city early in the 14th century, when two feudal villages merged. Unified for hundreds of years, its division into eastern Soviet and western Allied zones grew out of the devastation of World War II. Berlin was divided for just over 44 years, until the collapse of East Germany (another arbitrary relic of the cold war)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Interested in diving for fun and nonprofit? A small exhibition at the University Museum offers a quick overview of the field of marine archaeology, a summary of its insights into an ancient Middle Eastern seaport - and an invitation to prospective archaeological volunteers. The traveling show,"Secrets from an Ancient Sea: Marine Archaeology at Caesarea Maritima, Israel," is a concise, lucid presentation of research conducted by a team led by Robert L. Hohlfelder, chairman of the History Department at the University of Colorado in Boulder.
NEWS
December 28, 2003 | By Eva R. Priestley FOR THE INQUIRER
Turkey! Never, ever, had I thought of having a chance to take a trip to that part of the world. And then, out of the blue, came my sister's phone call. "How about a vacation in Turkey?" she asked. "I'll pay. " I couldn't refuse. Still, I approached the visit with mixed feelings. After our arrival at the Izmir airport, I was appalled by the brazenness of the porters, who grabbed passengers' luggage without seeking permission first. And on the road from the airport, I was saddened by the obvious poverty of the farmers, whose crude, dilapidated dwellings sat among parched, almost barren fields.
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NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the casualties of Syria's civil war is history. Five of the country's six World Heritage sites have "significant damage" and some buildings have been "reduced to rubble," according to a new report that includes work by University of Pennsylvania experts. The report, which was released this week, relied on high-resolution satellite photos to chronicle damage to mosques, Roman buildings, and a Byzantine castle. The Geospatial Technologies and Human Rights Project of the American Association for the Advancement of Science wrote the assessment with help from the Penn Cultural Heritage Center at Penn's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Syrian Heritage Task Force.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Maggie Michael and Haggag Salama, Associated Press
LUXOR, Egypt - Angry tourism workers and activists in Luxor threatened Monday to block a newly appointed Islamist governor from his office because of his links to a former militant group that killed scores of people in a 1997 attack in the ancient city and devastated Egypt's sightseeing industry. Adel el-Khayat was named to the provincial governor's post Sunday by President Mohammed Morsi, causing the outrage. Khayat is a member of the Construction and Development party, the political arm of Gamaa Islamiya, which waged an armed insurgency against the state starting in 1992 and attacked police, Coptic Christians, and tourists.
NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
PETRA, Jordan - President Obama set aside the Middle East's tricky politics Saturday to marvel at the beauty of one of the region's most stunning sites, the fabled ancient city of Petra. "This is pretty spectacular," he said, craning his neck to gaze up at the rock faces after emerging from a narrow pathway into a sun-splashed plaza in front of the grand Treasury. The soaring facade is considered the masterpiece of the ancient city carved into the rose-red stone by the Nabataeans more than 2,000 years ago. Obama's turn as tourist capped a four-day visit to the Middle East that included stops in Israel and the West Bank, as well Jordan.
NEWS
July 15, 2012 | By Karin Laub, Associated Press
BABYLON, Iraq - Nowadays it seems that Babylon just can't catch a break. Once the center of the ancient world, it has been despoiled in modern times by Saddam Hussein's fantasies of grandeur, invading armies, and village sprawl. Now come two more setbacks for the city famous for its Hanging Gardens and Tower of Babel: Parts of its grounds have been torn up for an oil pipeline, and a diplomatic spat is hampering its bid for coveted UNESCO heritage status. The pipeline was laid in March by Iraq's Oil Ministry, overriding outraged Iraqi archaeologists and drawing a rebuke from UNESCO, the global guardian of cultural heritage.
TRAVEL
February 5, 2012 | By Paula Fuchsberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
VALENCIA, Spain - This ancient city on Spain's Mediterranean coast has long drawn visitors to its UNESCO-cited, late Gothic silk exchange; its restored modernist central market; its plenitude of paella restaurants; and its old-fashioned cafes serving horchata , or chilled tiger-nut milk, a smooth and refreshing local specialty. But in recent years, it's a futuristic attraction more so than the historical and culinary ones that has landed Valencia on various travel publications' must-see lists.
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The scientist had traveled from Germany to examine the ancient items that lay before him on the University of Pennsylvania laboratory table, and he was dazzled. Earrings with cascades of golden leaves. Brooches adorned with tightly coiled spirals. A necklace strung with hundreds of gold ringlets and beads. The jewelry bore a striking resemblance to objects from one of the world's great collections - a controversial treasure unearthed long ago from the fabled city of Troy. Were the objects on the lab table also from the city that inspired Homer's epic poem of war?
NEWS
January 31, 2010 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The scientist had traveled from Germany to examine the ancient items that lay before him on the University of Pennsylvania laboratory table, and he was dazzled. Earrings with cascades of golden leaves. Brooches adorned with tightly coiled spirals. A necklace strung with hundreds of gold ringlets and beads. The jewelry bore a striking resemblance to objects from one of the world's great collections - a controversial treasure unearthed long ago from the fabled city of Troy. Were the objects on the lab table also from the city that inspired Homer's epic poem of war?
NEWS
November 23, 2009 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The writings and illustrations of the ancient Maya civilization have told us primarily about the elite classes and religion, with rich depictions of headdress-wearing kings and mystical jaguars and bats. Scenes of everyday life from the Central American people, on the other hand, are largely unknown - until now. A University of Pennsylvania scholar is part of a team that is deciphering newly discovered murals in Mexico, with images of commoners handling maize, clay vessels, and salt.
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By JOHN R. COHN
THIS MONTH, Berlin will mark the 20th anniversary of the fall of the city's infamous wall. Made of stark concrete and barbed wire, and dotted with watchtowers, it divided the heart of Berlin into eastern and western sectors. Hundreds died there trying to cross into freedom. Berlin became a city early in the 14th century, when two feudal villages merged. Unified for hundreds of years, its division into eastern Soviet and western Allied zones grew out of the devastation of World War II. Berlin was divided for just over 44 years, until the collapse of East Germany (another arbitrary relic of the cold war)
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Elliott Hester FOR THE INQUIRER
Because the city is home to numerous bands and live-concert venues, Time magazine called it "Europe's secret capital of music. " It boasts hip new restaurants, a thriving arts scene, stunning Victorian architecture, and enough rollicking pubs and clubs to satisfy party-hungry appetites. Oh, yeah, and the men like to dress up in skirts. Kilt-wearing blokes notwithstanding, Glasgow is a must-see destination. A onetime haven for shipbuilders and textile workers, this town of 600,000 has blossomed into a stylish city that even a hipster could love.
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