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Ancient History

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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ancient History opens with Jack and Ruth, having just made love, lying in bed talking a blue streak and taking great delight in one another's company. "I don't know when I've been this happy," Ruth concludes. Their apparent happiness takes the form of bright, witty, bantering dialogue that goes on so long that the audience begins to wonder if this can possibly be a play about a sexually satisfied, truly happy couple who are never going to disagree or quarrel. It would be a pretty boring business if it were, even with two attractive, able performers such as Patrick O'Connell and Liz Larsen speaking the articulate dialogue of playwright David Ives in this production of the New Hope Performing Arts Festival.
SPORTS
February 18, 1994 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
The wooden sign marking the entrance to the Carpenter Complex has carried an inscription that became a mocking echo in recent years. This property, it noted, was used by baseball's 1980 world champions. When the onillies' pitchers and catchers report for their first official workout today, they might notice an addition, hanging from two small chains at the bottom: National League Champions 1993 If the players do notice, manager Jim Fregosi would prefer that they consider that ancient history.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Charlene Mires, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 2,500 years ago, around the time the Greeks were building the temple at Delphi and the philosopher Confucius was born in China, what do you suppose was happening in the Ohio Valley? The phrase "nothing much" may leap to mind. But that would be wrong. In the river valleys that reach north from the Ohio, where hillsides cradle farms and small towns today, the Adena and Hopewell Indian cultures thrived for more than a thousand years, beginning as far back as 800 B.C. Their mark on the land was lasting: great conical burial mounds, earthen fortresses on hilltops, animal effigies formed from tons of clay and rich Ohio topsoil.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
David MacDonald Felsen, principal of the upper school at Germantown Friends School, has been named headmaster of Friends Central School in Lower Merion, school officials have announced. In a news release describing the appointment, Peter Arfaa, chairman of the board of trustees at Friends Central, said Felsen would assume the post July 1. Joseph R. Ludwig, assistant headmaster at Friends Central and principal of the lower school, has been acting headmaster since Thomas A. Wood, the school's longtime head, left in June to become director of consulting for Independent Educational Services in Princeton.
NEWS
November 6, 1997 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Margaret Magee Wilde, 96, a retired Latin teacher who was active in church activities, died Sunday at Cairnwood Village in Bryn Athyn, Montgomery County. Born in Birmingham, England, Miss Wilde was 12 when her family moved to Canada, where she was educated in public schools. She went on to the Savage School in New York City, where she received training in education and physical education. She later moved to Flushing, N.Y., where she was affiliated with the New Church/New York Circle and did office work in New York City.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | By Suzanne Gordon, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Macdonald Felsen, an administrator at Germantown Friends School, has been named headmaster of Friends' Central School on City Avenue, effective July 1. He will replace Thomas A. Wood, who resigned effective Jan. 1 to become director of consulting for Independent Educational Services in Princeton after 17 years as head of Friends' Central. Joseph Ludwig, lower school principal, has been acting headmaster since then. Felsen, 43, who began his career at Germantown Friends in 1966, is currently principal of the upper school and dean of faculty at Germantown Friends in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2009
"We storm the ranch, or we die trying!" Who doesn't want to like a jokey road movie about a band of Star Wars nerds breaking into George Lucas' Skywalker Ranch to steal a print of Episode I ? Set in the fall of 1998 - six months before the release of the fabled Phantom Menace (seems like ancient history) - Kyle Newman's slapdash feature boasts cameos from Star Wars alums Carrie Fisher and Billy Dee Williams, along with Danny McBride, Seth Rogen (in dual roles as a Star Trek geek and a Las Vegas pimp)
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Most Americans are anxious about the Gulf War, but archaeologists who specialize in ancient Middle Eastern cultures have an added fear - the destruction of ancient treasures. In the minds of University of Pennsylvania archaeologist Dr. Richard Zettler and his colleagues, Iraq is "Mesopotamia," where nearly every spade of earth contains remnants of ancient history. "It's a very flat flood plain (between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers)," Zettler says. "The mounds are the highest points, and that's where the Iraqis have installed their anti-aircraft guns.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
THOSE TRASH citations are a joke. I've received a few in recent months, and all but one has been thrown out. I had one ticket placed on my door just before my son left for school. It said there was trash in front of my door. I saw no trash, I called as did the person in the article. I have yet to get a return call. This is simply a revenue-generator for the city. I have owned my house for 14 years in University City and always kept a trash can on the porch. It's only been lately that the city has started enforcing a statute that no one in my neighbor hood is aware of. The employees you speak to only want to settle before seeing the judge.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's said that fussy roses attract obsessives and garish tropicals speak mainly to men. What do we know, then, about the people and personalities who lust after peonies? It's a question Eleanor Tickner, veteran peony personality herself, answers without hesitation: 75 percent are female, older than 50, and sentimental about "Grandma's floppies. " Those are the old-fashioned red, white, and pink beauties beloved by earlier generations, even though their huge blooms went face first in the mud during spring rains.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2015 | By Michael D. Schaffer, For The Inquirer
Philadelphia and history go together like the Fourth of July and fireworks, like pretzels and mustard, like Hall and Oates. Philadelphia and American history, that is. World history? The connection isn't so obvious. But when DK Publishing and the Smithsonian Institution set out recently to tell the story of humankind through 1,000 objects, on the premise that humans define themselves by what they make, they turned to the Penn Museum for much of their material. More than 200 of the objects photographed for the book are from the Penn collection - and many of them are on display for you to see. The red-brick building, in the shadow of Franklin Field between 32d and 33d Streets, houses a world-class assemblage of about a million artifacts, from Egyptian mummies to Chinese statues to pottery fashioned in Central America 2,000 years before the arrival of Europeans.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2014 | By William Ecenbarger, For The Inquirer
ABOARD THE M/V VIKING IDI - Johann Strauss notwithstanding, the Danube is not blue - rather, a dull gray-green - but this chromatic error takes none of the romance and majesty away from Europe's greatest river as it winds through spectacular reminders of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance history. We - that, is my 168 fellow passengers and I - cruise past terraced vineyards that have been producing wine for a thousand years, red-roofed villages visited by Charlemagne and Napoleon, ruined castles built in the 13th century to repel Mongol invaders, and the remnants of Roman walls that resonate with centuries.
SPORTS
September 21, 2012 | By TIM GILBERT, gilbert@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - This is what Temple always looks forward to. It's the Owls' annual shot at Penn State, one they've had every year since 2006 but one they haven't capitalized on since 1941. Just don't mention it to Lions coach Bill O'Brien. "At no point in time do I ever address winning streaks. That has nothing to do with this game," O'Brien said with emphasis earlier this week. "Every year is different. I don't know what they were like in [1941], but in 2012, this is an excellent Temple team with a bunch of good players.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's said that fussy roses attract obsessives and garish tropicals speak mainly to men. What do we know, then, about the people and personalities who lust after peonies? It's a question Eleanor Tickner, veteran peony personality herself, answers without hesitation: 75 percent are female, older than 50, and sentimental about "Grandma's floppies. " Those are the old-fashioned red, white, and pink beauties beloved by earlier generations, even though their huge blooms went face first in the mud during spring rains.
SPORTS
October 14, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
MICHAEL VICK'S still-sore ribs likely will preclude what surely would have been one of the more interesting story lines this fall, maybe even on a par with Donovan McNabb's return to Lincoln Financial Field as a Washington Redskin or a potential Roy Halladay vs. Cliff Lee pitching matchup in the World Series. When the Eagles host the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday afternoon, Kevin Kolb is expected to get the start at quarterback in place of the injured Vick with a local kid, Matt Ryan, taking the snaps for the visitors.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
THOSE TRASH citations are a joke. I've received a few in recent months, and all but one has been thrown out. I had one ticket placed on my door just before my son left for school. It said there was trash in front of my door. I saw no trash, I called as did the person in the article. I have yet to get a return call. This is simply a revenue-generator for the city. I have owned my house for 14 years in University City and always kept a trash can on the porch. It's only been lately that the city has started enforcing a statute that no one in my neighbor hood is aware of. The employees you speak to only want to settle before seeing the judge.
NEWS
June 29, 2010 | By Larry King and John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Though all eyes will be on Tiger Woods, another African American of note will be at Aronimink Golf Club this week. Kenneth Hill plans to be in the gallery of the place where he quietly made history. As the PGA Tour brings its AT&T National event to the once all-white club, the towering black frame of Hill will be seen once more on the verdant slopes of Aronimink, a playing field he hopes he has subtly helped to level. "I can't deny that I honestly had some impact," said Hill, 72, an affable business executive who in 1998 became the first African American to be granted full-fledged membership by the venerable club.
NEWS
May 31, 2010 | By John J. Rooney
Before World War II, there were seven of us who palled around together. We met mostly in front of or inside Salvatore's family grocery store, on Fox Street below Hunting Park, fooling around and figuring out what to do for some fun that evening. During the war, like most guys our age, we joined up: Phil, Frank, Salvatore, and Joe with the Army, Jimmy and I with the Navy, and Bill with the Marines. After the war, I went back to college. The others returned to old jobs or found new ones.
NEWS
May 31, 2010
By John J. Rooney Before World War II, there were seven of us who palled around together. We met mostly in front of or inside Salvatore's family grocery store, on Fox Street below Hunting Park, fooling around and figuring out what to do for some fun that evening. During the war, like most guys our age, we joined up: Phil, Frank, Salvatore, and Joe with the Army, Jimmy and I with the Navy, and Bill with the Marines. After the war, I went back to college. The others returned to old jobs or found new ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2009
"We storm the ranch, or we die trying!" Who doesn't want to like a jokey road movie about a band of Star Wars nerds breaking into George Lucas' Skywalker Ranch to steal a print of Episode I ? Set in the fall of 1998 - six months before the release of the fabled Phantom Menace (seems like ancient history) - Kyle Newman's slapdash feature boasts cameos from Star Wars alums Carrie Fisher and Billy Dee Williams, along with Danny McBride, Seth Rogen (in dual roles as a Star Trek geek and a Las Vegas pimp)
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