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Andrea Doria

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NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
History came alive for fourth and fifth graders at the three Hatboro- Horsham schools last week when they traveled by video to the wreck of the Andrea Doria. Diver Ed Suarez went to the Pennypack, Hallowell and Crooked Billet schools last week to show the students what it is like to travel far out to sea, 245 feet down, and back in time 33 years. The Italian luxury liner collided with the Swedish vessel Stockholm on July 26, 1956, in a fog bank 50 miles off the coast of Nantucket Island, killing 51 of the 1,709 passengers aboard.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 200 feet beneath the Atlantic Ocean, diver John Moyer swam into the wreck of the famed ocean liner, the Andrea Doria, past barnicle-encrusted light fixtures and through silt-filled corridors and dark, corroded stairways. With air bubbles streaming behind him, he glided into the first-class "Wintergarden" lounge and looked down at a huge mosaic frieze that he remembered seeing in old photographs, before the ship sank in 1956 after colliding with another liner. Carefully, Moyer retrieved the Italian mosaic and sent it to the surface, where the crew of his salvage vessel broke out in cheers.
NEWS
July 18, 2006 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scattered like marbles on a wax-shined dance floor, passengers aboard the 29,000-ton luxury ocean liner Andrea Doria panicked and prayed, some of them screaming "Titanic!" and "iceberg!" The SS Stockholm, a smaller passenger liner, had rammed and cracked open the Andrea Doria in open ocean 45 miles south of Nantucket Island, Mass., at 11:10 p.m., July 25, 1956. At the time, passengers didn't know what had caused the thunderous noise and fireworks-like explosions that would sink the vessel.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The weather on the Atlantic was calm during the diving expedition, and the crew on the chartered boat Wahoo stared into the placid sea waiting for the second of two 700-pound mosaics to reach the surface. Then, just as the yellow air bags lifting the artwork from the sunken Andrea Doria burst above the waters, the winds picked up and the sea got angry. "It was like the wreck didn't want to give them up," said Gene Peterson, 37, of Seaville, a professional diver. But after three hours of struggling to pull the mosaics onto the Wahoo, the 11 divers and seven crew members finally recovered their treasure, once buried 250 feet below the sea inside the Italian liner.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Question: I have a ceramic pitcher and bowl, cream colored with dark blue and peach flowers and butterflies. The rims are trimmed with gold and the bottoms marked: "Indian, S.F. & Co. " What can you tell me about them? Answer: Your earthenware pitcher and wash basin were manufactured by S. Fielding & Co., one of many potteries located in the Staffordshire region of England during the late 19th century. The set's "Indian" pattern derives from Indian chintz fabric. The set would retail for $350 to $500, assuming it is in perfect condition; chips and repairs will greatly reduce its value.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is the Mount Everest of deep-sea diving - a daring, dangerous adventure that lures divers from around the world to test their skills and try their luck. It is not a walk in the park. The diving target rests in about 240 feet of water, deep enough for divers to experience decompression sickness and its painful effects while returning to the surface if they're not careful. The currents are strong, the water is cold. And, there is a good possibility divers will see at least one shark.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK Designer makes waves with 'Titanic' doll Move over, Barbie. The even more shapely Rose DeWitt Bukater is riding Titanic's wave of popularity right into FAO Schwarz. "Rose has much more realistic proportions than some other fashion dolls, although she is probably a bit thinner than actress Kate Winslet," said Robert Tonner, who sculpted the doll and designed its elaborate period costumes for the limited-issue collection to be released by 20th Century Fox and the upscale toy store in November.
NEWS
July 26, 2009 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was June 1967, and the 22-year-old woman with a toothy smile from West Chester was aboard a smelly fishing boat with 11 men eager to dive the offshore wreck of the famed Andrea Doria, 220 feet below the Atlantic. Evelyn Bartram Dudas didn't recover the best artifact - the ship's compass, which went to her future husband, John Dudas - but she returned from the trip a hero as the first woman to reach what is considered the Mount Everest of shipwrecks. It was a defining moment in the life of the now 64-year-old scuba entrepreneur, who owns a well-known Westtown dive shop, teaches, and leads diving trips around the world, and it landed her a spot as a contestant on TV's To Tell the Truth.
NEWS
September 1, 1987 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Summer's end, and we are having an outbreak of warm and clammy sentiment. How else to explain the preoccupation of otherwise busy American congressmen with the sanctity of a wreck at the bottom of the North Atlantic? The French are trying to raise the Titanic, or rather, pieces of it. Worse, they plan to open one of its strongboxes in Monte Carlo on television. Telly Savalas will officiate. Americans, who recently opened the Andrea Doria safe on camera, are shocked at the sacrilege.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among East Coast wreck divers, Michael A. deCamp already was a legend when, in June 1966, he got together a dozen buddies to charter a fishing boat and headed for the wild waters south of Nantucket, to the resting place of the Andrea Doria. The Italian luxury liner had lain there, 250 feet down on her starboard side, since July 26, 1956, after colliding on a foggy night with the Swedish passenger ship Stockholm. The Doria had been visited by well-heeled explorers, notably department-store scion Peter Gimbel, with an eye to salvaging its riches.
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NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Tinney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among East Coast wreck divers, Michael A. deCamp already was a legend when, in June 1966, he got together a dozen buddies to charter a fishing boat and headed for the wild waters south of Nantucket, to the resting place of the Andrea Doria. The Italian luxury liner had lain there, 250 feet down on her starboard side, since July 26, 1956, after colliding on a foggy night with the Swedish passenger ship Stockholm. The Doria had been visited by well-heeled explorers, notably department-store scion Peter Gimbel, with an eye to salvaging its riches.
NEWS
July 26, 2009 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was June 1967, and the 22-year-old woman with a toothy smile from West Chester was aboard a smelly fishing boat with 11 men eager to dive the offshore wreck of the famed Andrea Doria, 220 feet below the Atlantic. Evelyn Bartram Dudas didn't recover the best artifact - the ship's compass, which went to her future husband, John Dudas - but she returned from the trip a hero as the first woman to reach what is considered the Mount Everest of shipwrecks. It was a defining moment in the life of the now 64-year-old scuba entrepreneur, who owns a well-known Westtown dive shop, teaches, and leads diving trips around the world, and it landed her a spot as a contestant on TV's To Tell the Truth.
NEWS
July 18, 2006 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scattered like marbles on a wax-shined dance floor, passengers aboard the 29,000-ton luxury ocean liner Andrea Doria panicked and prayed, some of them screaming "Titanic!" and "iceberg!" The SS Stockholm, a smaller passenger liner, had rammed and cracked open the Andrea Doria in open ocean 45 miles south of Nantucket Island, Mass., at 11:10 p.m., July 25, 1956. At the time, passengers didn't know what had caused the thunderous noise and fireworks-like explosions that would sink the vessel.
NEWS
September 17, 2005 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Directly ahead and slightly below, a mysterious structure slowly took form amid the underwater blur. The thing was solid, sharp-cornered, encrusted with mollusks. Not a shipwreck. It was a wrecked fire truck, parked on the reservoir's silty bottom, under 25 feet of water. The novice scuba diver poked gingerly at a rusted cabinet door. Struggling to maintain neutral buoyancy - neither shooting to the surface nor dropping to the floor - he maneuvered up and over to the cab, its roof removed, and entered upside down.
NEWS
July 1, 2004 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1991, a dozen deep-sea divers went searching for a mysterious wreck 60 miles from Barnegat Light off the New Jersey coast. At least, they thought it was a wreck. All they knew for sure was that something big was down there on the ocean floor, 230 feet below the surface. It was probably just a garbage barge or maybe even just a pile of rocks, but maybe, if they were lucky, it might be an undiscovered hulk filled with treasures. What they found was more surprising and intriguing than a ship full of gold: a World War II German U-boat, with the remains of its crew still inside the labyrinth of twisted metal and wires.
NEWS
November 20, 1998 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After spending more than $100,000 and countless hours in court, local divers who salvaged many of the treasures of the famous shipwreck Andrea Doria are finally ready to put them on display. "Andrea Doria, the Moyer Exhibition" will be the centerpiece of the Northeast Dive Association's Ocean Expo in Fort Washington this weekend. The Andrea Doria, an Italian ocean liner that sank about 50 miles off Nantucket on July 26, 1956, was known throughout the world as a "floating art gallery.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK Designer makes waves with 'Titanic' doll Move over, Barbie. The even more shapely Rose DeWitt Bukater is riding Titanic's wave of popularity right into FAO Schwarz. "Rose has much more realistic proportions than some other fashion dolls, although she is probably a bit thinner than actress Kate Winslet," said Robert Tonner, who sculpted the doll and designed its elaborate period costumes for the limited-issue collection to be released by 20th Century Fox and the upscale toy store in November.
NEWS
December 7, 1996 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey federal judge whose immigrant father survived the Black Sunday 1918 sinking of the passenger ship Carolina off Atlantic City by a German U-boat plunged into his own past yesterday as he granted salvage rights to the wreck to a commercial diver. The judge granted the rights to the long-lost shipwreck to John B. Chatterton of Essex County, who has located it in 240 feet of water 70 miles off the Jersey coast. Chatterton said he plans to use inflated airbags to bring up the purser's storage compartment.
NEWS
November 26, 1993 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 200 feet beneath the Atlantic Ocean, diver John Moyer swam into the wreck of the famed ocean liner, the Andrea Doria, past barnicle-encrusted light fixtures and through silt-filled corridors and dark, corroded stairways. With air bubbles streaming behind him, he glided into the first-class "Wintergarden" lounge and looked down at a huge mosaic frieze that he remembered seeing in old photographs, before the ship sank in 1956 after colliding with another liner. Carefully, Moyer retrieved the Italian mosaic and sent it to the surface, where the crew of his salvage vessel broke out in cheers.
NEWS
July 16, 1993 | By Sonia R. Lelii, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The weather on the Atlantic was calm during the diving expedition, and the crew on the chartered boat Wahoo stared into the placid sea waiting for the second of two 700-pound mosaics to reach the surface. Then, just as the yellow air bags lifting the artwork from the sunken Andrea Doria burst above the waters, the winds picked up and the sea got angry. "It was like the wreck didn't want to give them up," said Gene Peterson, 37, of Seaville, a professional diver. But after three hours of struggling to pull the mosaics onto the Wahoo, the 11 divers and seven crew members finally recovered their treasure, once buried 250 feet below the sea inside the Italian liner.
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