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Andrei Tarkovsky

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NEWS
November 30, 2012
Boris N. Strugatsky, 79, a prolific writer who used the genre of science fiction to voice criticisms of Soviet life that would have been unthinkable in other literary forms, died Nov. 19 in St. Petersburg. The cause was heart failure, his biographer, Boris Vishnevsky, said. Employed as an astronomer at a state observatory, Mr. Strugatsky began collaborating on science fiction with his older brother, Arkady, in 1956. Together they produced rich, often bleak allegorical landscapes that ranged from a dysfunctional institute for the research of magic in Mondays Begin on Saturday to a postapocalyptic "zone" littered with deadly extraterrestrial objects in Roadside Picnic , adapted for Stalker, Andrei Tarkovsky's revered 1979 film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Sacrifice," a drama starring Erland Josephson and Susan Fleetwood. Written and directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. Running time: 149 minutes. In Swedish, with English subtitles. An Orion release. At the Ritz Five. If I had to pick one word to describe "The Sacrifice," it would come down to a choice between "boring" and "strange. " Boring would win. "The Sacrifice," which was the last film of the expatriate Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky, who died in December, is like the worst kind of bore, the person who not only demands your attention but mercilessly prolongs what he has to say with irrelevant details, extensive pauses and frequent throat-clearing.
NEWS
December 30, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Andrei Tarkovsky, the Soviet director who died of cancer yesterday in Paris at age 54, was less a filmmaker than a most original film poet and artist. In his 25-year career, he made only seven full-length features, laboring over each with the eye of an Old Master working in a surrealist's idiom. He had no real counterpart in the West, though it might be said that the most restrained of Tarkovsky's images resemble those of Martin Scorsese at his most delirious. Tarkovsky was never recognized as an artist of the first rank in his native country.
NEWS
February 4, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The late Andrei Tarkovsky died of cancer in December at the age of 54. To call the Soviet expatriate a film director would be as gross a misnomer as identifying Leonardo as a cartoonist. Tarkovsky was a master whose canvas happened to be film, a poet whose forebodings produced movies uniquely visual and singularly visceral in their impact. Tarkovsky's award-winning last film, The Sacrifice, sadly is not his best - though it might be his most pretentious. Suffice to say that even pretentious Tarkovsky has more to recommend it than unaffected most anyone else.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In screen science fiction like Total Recall, we are more accustomed to deeds than words. Solaris, Andrei Tarkovsky's epic and loquacious contribution to the genre, might strike some movie-goers as the war of the words, but it remains an intriguing Soviet rebuttal to Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. Tarkovsky made Solaris in 1972 with a strong preference for philosophical issues over visual pyrotechnics in examining a life force on a strange planet investigated by cosmonauts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Some art historians dismiss Rembrandt (1936) because this biography starring Charles Laughton as the Dutch master perpetuates the fiction that the artist's Nightwatch was misunderstood in its time, ditto the painter himself. Yet this superlative portrait of the artist captures so many deeper truths about Rembrandt, about art, about patronage, about love, that it is one of the most supremely embraceable of movies. Laughton provides an affecting and affectionate interpretation of the artist, a man of contrasts stark as the pearly light and velvet shadow of his paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Poor Gully Jimson. He is an artist without a farthing in his pocket, yet his paintings are hanging in London's National Gallery. But does he care? As marvelously characterized by Alec Guinness in The Horse's Mouth (1958), a memorable adaptation of Joyce Cary's novel, Gully only cares about finding a wall on which to paint a heroic fresco of Lazarus. Scored to the carousel-like music of Sergei Prokofiev, The Horse's Mouth is a jaunty journey through London's taprooms and tenements, with the enterprising Gully seeking solace in the meaty arms of his ex-wife and his soon-to-be-ex-patrons.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
No disrespect to Alexander Sokurov - the Russian exponent of Transcendental Cinema and protege of Andrei Tarkovsky - but if you want to paint, go get a canvas and a brush. "Painterly" doesn't begin to describe Sokurov's Mother and Son, which begins with a shot of a couple huddled together in a murky blur and stays there - and stays there - until one figure finally stirs, issuing a benumbed blurt of words. ("Last night I had a dream," says the man. "It was strange. ") The couple that occupy this static space, and then move on to various other static spaces, and to a landscape of bent trees and crooked horizons, are the title characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a title like Bullet in the Face , you know Alan Spencer's latest TV comedy means business. Lauded by fans for more than three decades as the creator of ABC's mid-1980s police satire Sledge Hammer! , Spencer returns to the genre with Bullet , which he developed last year for IFC. A critical and ratings hit, the wickedly dark and hilarious series ran for six half-hour episodes and is now available on DVD. Imbued with a unique postmodern noir look, the series is set in Brute City, a "melting pot of crime" ruled by vicious kingpins such as Racken (Eric Roberts)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Andrei Roublev was first released in the late 1960s, critic Nigel Andrews hailed it as "the one indisputable Russian masterpiece of the last decade. " This sweeping epic, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky and shot in CinemaScope, is ostensibly a biography of the 15th-century Russian icon painter, but so little was known about the artist's life that Tarkovsky uses Roublev (played by Anatoly Solonitsin) as a jumping-off point to examine the creative process - and the creative process at odds with authoritarian rule and the turmoil of a country torn asunder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a title like Bullet in the Face , you know Alan Spencer's latest TV comedy means business. Lauded by fans for more than three decades as the creator of ABC's mid-1980s police satire Sledge Hammer! , Spencer returns to the genre with Bullet , which he developed last year for IFC. A critical and ratings hit, the wickedly dark and hilarious series ran for six half-hour episodes and is now available on DVD. Imbued with a unique postmodern noir look, the series is set in Brute City, a "melting pot of crime" ruled by vicious kingpins such as Racken (Eric Roberts)
NEWS
November 30, 2012
Boris N. Strugatsky, 79, a prolific writer who used the genre of science fiction to voice criticisms of Soviet life that would have been unthinkable in other literary forms, died Nov. 19 in St. Petersburg. The cause was heart failure, his biographer, Boris Vishnevsky, said. Employed as an astronomer at a state observatory, Mr. Strugatsky began collaborating on science fiction with his older brother, Arkady, in 1956. Together they produced rich, often bleak allegorical landscapes that ranged from a dysfunctional institute for the research of magic in Mondays Begin on Saturday to a postapocalyptic "zone" littered with deadly extraterrestrial objects in Roadside Picnic , adapted for Stalker, Andrei Tarkovsky's revered 1979 film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Like a prophecy too dangerous for its times, Alejandro Jodorowsky's infamous, myth-and-blood-soaked cult film El Topo went into hiding not long after its 1970 release. Actually, it fell victim to a 30-year legal dispute between Jodorowsky and the film's distributor, Allen Klein. But it may as well have vanished. A surreal cross between a Sergio Leone spaghetti western and (a poor man's version of) Andrei Tarkovsky's metaphysical sagas (Stalker, Mirror), El Topo made a big splash during its brief run. Widely credited as the first midnight movie, it enjoyed a sold-out nightly run at the Elgin Theatre in Manhattan for more than nine months, starting in December 1970.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002 | By LAURA RANDALL For the Daily News
If George Clooney ever decides to publish a book about his life, the focus won't be his famous family, tabloid-worthy love affairs or acting career. It will be his 1972 IBM Selectric typewriter. The computer-challenged actor likes to use the typewritten word to express his views, good or bad. Fox News Channel's Bill O'Reilly was on the receiving end of one of his letters when he questioned the sincerity of a group of celebrities who raised money for 9/11 victims. So was actress Renee Zellweger, after she defied skeptics by turning her Texas drawl into an authentic British accent in the film "Bridget Jones's Diary.
NEWS
November 27, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Endlessly repeating the same process and hoping for different results was Einstein's definition of insanity. Yet compulsive repetition makes for terrific films, such as Groundhog Day and Solaris, Steven Soderbergh's enigmatic sci-fi sonnet starring George Clooney as an astro-psychologist who could use a shrink himself. When Dr. Chris Kelvin (Clooney) travels to a distant space station to treat hallucinating scientists orbiting the ocean planet Solaris, his dead wife, Rheya (Natascha McElhone)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001 | By ROB LOWMAN Los Angeles Daily News
The Sundance Channel is joining with the Criterion Collection to present a series of landmark foreign films over 13 weeks beginning tonight, with a different title airing each Thursday. The series will include works by such renowned directors as Jean Renoir, Roman Polanski, Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa and Federico Fellini. Each film is preceded at 8:30 p.m. by "Conversations in World Cinema," which talks to filmmakers. Past guests have included Liv Ullmann for "Faithless," Ang Lee for "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and Ed Harris for "Pollock.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
No disrespect to Alexander Sokurov - the Russian exponent of Transcendental Cinema and protege of Andrei Tarkovsky - but if you want to paint, go get a canvas and a brush. "Painterly" doesn't begin to describe Sokurov's Mother and Son, which begins with a shot of a couple huddled together in a murky blur and stays there - and stays there - until one figure finally stirs, issuing a benumbed blurt of words. ("Last night I had a dream," says the man. "It was strange. ") The couple that occupy this static space, and then move on to various other static spaces, and to a landscape of bent trees and crooked horizons, are the title characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When Andrei Roublev was first released in the late 1960s, critic Nigel Andrews hailed it as "the one indisputable Russian masterpiece of the last decade. " This sweeping epic, directed by Andrei Tarkovsky and shot in CinemaScope, is ostensibly a biography of the 15th-century Russian icon painter, but so little was known about the artist's life that Tarkovsky uses Roublev (played by Anatoly Solonitsin) as a jumping-off point to examine the creative process - and the creative process at odds with authoritarian rule and the turmoil of a country torn asunder.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Poor Gully Jimson. He is an artist without a farthing in his pocket, yet his paintings are hanging in London's National Gallery. But does he care? As marvelously characterized by Alec Guinness in The Horse's Mouth (1958), a memorable adaptation of Joyce Cary's novel, Gully only cares about finding a wall on which to paint a heroic fresco of Lazarus. Scored to the carousel-like music of Sergei Prokofiev, The Horse's Mouth is a jaunty journey through London's taprooms and tenements, with the enterprising Gully seeking solace in the meaty arms of his ex-wife and his soon-to-be-ex-patrons.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Some art historians dismiss Rembrandt (1936) because this biography starring Charles Laughton as the Dutch master perpetuates the fiction that the artist's Nightwatch was misunderstood in its time, ditto the painter himself. Yet this superlative portrait of the artist captures so many deeper truths about Rembrandt, about art, about patronage, about love, that it is one of the most supremely embraceable of movies. Laughton provides an affecting and affectionate interpretation of the artist, a man of contrasts stark as the pearly light and velvet shadow of his paintings.
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